laptop heats up fast - Mandriva

This is a discussion on laptop heats up fast - Mandriva ; Hi am using compaq f700 laptop i have kima applet installed, in which it says nvidiacore temp is 60 degree celcius....often when i start my laptop i hear the laptop fan ...its too loud, and i can feel the laptop ...

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  1. laptop heats up fast

    Hi

    am using compaq f700 laptop i have kima applet installed, in which it
    says nvidiacore temp is 60 degree celcius....often when i start my
    laptop i hear the laptop fan ...its too loud, and i can feel the
    laptop heating up...the kima applet on start up of kde shows nvidia
    core temp to be over 65 and when am using skype to video conference
    the temp goes upto 85 degree celcius...is all this normal?

    what is the normal temp of nvidiacore? should i worry if temp goes
    over 60 degrees?

  2. Re: laptop heats up fast

    Sindhu wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > am using compaq f700 laptop i have kima applet installed, in which it
    > says nvidiacore temp is 60 degree celcius....often when i start my
    > laptop i hear the laptop fan ...its too loud, and i can feel the
    > laptop heating up...the kima applet on start up of kde shows nvidia
    > core temp to be over 65 and when am using skype to video conference
    > the temp goes upto 85 degree celcius...is all this normal?
    >
    > what is the normal temp of nvidiacore? should i worry if temp goes
    > over 60 degrees?


    There is a newsgroup alt.computer.peripherals.video.nvidia or
    something close to that (search for nvidia) that can provide
    such answers. Googling at groups.google.com/advanced_search?q=&
    should turn up answers given over the past several months.

    I did not pay a lot of attention, but my guess is 60 Celsius is
    warm but not a problem while 85 Celsius is likely at the top end of
    acceptable.

    Gamers routinely use special heat-transfer paste to glue the
    heatsink to the cpu or graphics board main processor, often
    replace the standard heatsink with one that works better (a few
    dollars, plus a few dollars for the paste to stick it on with),
    and are quite ingeneous in figuring ways to replace fans to get
    better cooling or lower noise.

    Depending on what you find out about temperatures, you may need
    to replace heat sink and fan and stick the heat sink on with
    quality paste. The nvidia newsgroup can tell you all about
    such things. (There is some rubbish noise on the group, but
    just ignore it.)

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  3. Re: laptop heats up fast

    Drat. The newsgroup is,

    alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia


    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  4. Re: laptop heats up fast

    Sindhu wrote:

    > Hi
    >
    > am using compaq f700 laptop i have kima applet installed, in which it
    > says nvidiacore temp is 60 degree celcius....often when i start my
    > laptop i hear the laptop fan ...its too loud, and i can feel the
    > laptop heating up...the kima applet on start up of kde shows nvidia
    > core temp to be over 65 and when am using skype to video conference
    > the temp goes upto 85 degree celcius...is all this normal?
    >
    > what is the normal temp of nvidiacore? should i worry if temp goes
    > over 60 degrees?


    I had the same fan problem running MD2007 + 2008 pwp on an Acer laptop.
    Fan started after a few minutes after boot up and shortly reached max rpm.
    Temp was then 55-60 degrees Celsius. I tried once to put the laptop outside
    in way below zero temp. and AFAIR temp. dropped to around 25 Celsius but
    the fan kept spinning at max. rpm. Using Wimdows this didn't happen. So,
    I think some laptop features are still missing in Mandriva / Linux.

    In my present desktop the Nvidia card shows around 60 degrees C and have
    a 'slow-down limit' set to 115 degrees C. So maybe nothing to worry about
    if one can stand the noise. I could not.





  5. Re: laptop heats up fast

    > In my present desktop the Nvidia card shows around 60 degrees C and have
    > a 'slow-down limit' set to 115 degrees C. *So maybe nothing to worry about
    > if one can stand the noise. *I could not.


    am using the laptop kernel currently, my friend said its okay to
    switch to a desktop one or better yet use a stock kernel like
    vanilla...although i will have to compile it myself..

    here are the kernels i have...

    [sindhu@laptop ~]$ ls /usr/src/
    linux-2.6.24.4-desktop586-1mnb/ linux-2.6.27-desktop586-0.rc8.2mnb/
    linux-2.6.24.5-desktop586-2mnb/ nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1/
    linux-2.6.24.5-laptop-2mnb/ rpm/

    which one do i use among these for best performance? i cannot use
    rc8.2mnb because i don't have the appropriate nvidia drivers for that
    kernel, so i can't login to KDE if i boot through that kernel.

    should i get a stock kernel?

  6. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 00:32:10 -0400, Sindhu wrote:

    > am using the laptop kernel currently, my friend said its okay to
    > switch to a desktop one or better yet use a stock kernel like
    > should i get a stock kernel?


    The differences between the desktop and laptop kernels are so small that
    Mandriva 2009 no longer has a laptop kernel.
    http://wiki.mandriva.com/en/2009.0_N...laptop_removed

    While digging through the various kernel configuration options is usefull
    for learning, I doubt you'll find much of a difference, unless the
    current Mandriva kernel is failing to work with some of your hardware.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  7. Re: laptop heats up fast

    > While digging through the various kernel configuration options is usefull
    > for learning, I doubt you'll find much of a difference, unless the
    > current Mandriva kernel is failing to work with some of your hardware.


    after i upgraded to mandriva 2009, am having a list of broken stuff,
    for example the shutdown/reboot options don't show up in logout
    anymore, my friend said this is an acpi problem and i must try booting
    in some other kernel which i did, but the shutdown options didnt show
    up there too. am not sure now if this shutdown options thing is a KDE
    bug or a kernel problem...what do you think?

  8. Re: laptop heats up fast

    Sindhu wrote:

    >
    > after i upgraded to mandriva 2009, am having a list of broken stuff,
    > for example the shutdown/reboot options don't show up in logout
    > anymore, my friend said this is an acpi problem and i must try booting
    > in some other kernel which i did, but the shutdown options didnt show
    > up there too. am not sure now if this shutdown options thing is a KDE
    > bug or a kernel problem...what do you think?


    This is how the shutdown/reeboot thing works for me (both MD 2007 and
    2008.0)

    If I choose to start X (runlevel 5) directly at boot , that is, if I
    choose 'Launch the graphical environment when your system starts' in mcc /
    boot, I will get the shutdown/reeboot/restart options when logging out.

    If I choose to start into runlevel 3, as I prefer, I will not get those
    options. Just an 'End this session' dialog. So, I don't think it's a
    kernel problem (even in MD 2009). More like a security thing maybe.


  9. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Tuesday 14 October 2008 17:32, someone identifying as *Iordani* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > Sindhu wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> after i upgraded to mandriva 2009, am having a list of broken stuff,
    >> for example the shutdown/reboot options don't show up in logout
    >> anymore, my friend said this is an acpi problem and i must try booting
    >> in some other kernel which i did, but the shutdown options didnt show
    >> up there too. am not sure now if this shutdown options thing is a KDE
    >> bug or a kernel problem...what do you think?

    >
    > This is how the shutdown/reeboot thing works for me (both MD 2007 and
    > 2008.0)
    >
    > If I choose to start X (runlevel 5) directly at boot , that is, if I
    > choose 'Launch the graphical environment when your system starts' in mcc /
    > boot, I will get the shutdown/reeboot/restart options when logging out.
    >
    > If I choose to start into runlevel 3, as I prefer, I will not get those
    > options. Just an 'End this session' dialog. So, I don't think it's a
    > kernel problem (even in MD 2009). More like a security thing maybe.


    This is indeed how it's supposed to be, with or without additional password
    checks for shutting down the machine from runlevel 5, depending on the
    chosen security level, KDE-specific security options and eventual
    customizations through tweaking of the PAM files.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  10. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Oct 14, 9:14*pm, Aragorn wrote:
    > On Tuesday 14 October 2008 17:32, someone identifying as *Iordani* wrote
    > in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/
    >
    >
    >
    > > Sindhu wrote:

    >
    > >> after i upgraded to mandriva 2009, am having a list of broken stuff,
    > >> for example the shutdown/reboot options don't show up in logout
    > >> anymore, my friend said this is an acpi problem and i must try booting
    > >> in some other kernel which i did, but the shutdown options didnt show
    > >> up there too. am not sure now if this shutdown options thing is a KDE
    > >> bug or a kernel problem...what do you think?

    >
    > > This is how the shutdown/reeboot thing works for me (both MD 2007 and
    > > 2008.0)

    >
    > > If I choose to start X (runlevel 5) directly at boot , *that is, *if I
    > > choose 'Launch the graphical environment when your system starts' in mcc /
    > > boot, *I will get the shutdown/reeboot/restart options when logging out.

    >
    > > If I choose to start into runlevel 3, *as I prefer, *I will not getthose
    > > options. *Just an 'End this session' dialog. *So, *I don't think it's a
    > > kernel problem (even in MD 2009). *More like a security thing maybe.

    >
    > This is indeed how it's supposed to be, with or without additional password
    > checks for shutting down the machine from runlevel 5, depending on the
    > chosen security level, KDE-specific security options and eventual
    > customizations through tweaking of the PAM files.
    >
    > --
    > *Aragorn*
    > (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)


    does this mean i should lower the settings of security ? ( in mcc,
    its set as "Standard" right now)..

  11. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Tuesday 14 October 2008 19:02, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > On Oct 14, 9:14*pm, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >> On Tuesday 14 October 2008 17:32, someone identifying as *Iordani* wrote
    >> in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/
    >>
    >> > If I choose to start X (runlevel 5) directly at boot , *that is, *if I
    >> > choose 'Launch the graphical environment when your system starts' in
    >> > mcc / boot, *I will get the shutdown/reeboot/restart options when
    >> > logging out.

    >>
    >> > If I choose to start into runlevel 3, *as I prefer, *I will not get
    >> > those options. *Just an 'End this session' dialog. *So, *I don't think
    >> > it's a kernel problem (even in MD 2009). *More like a security thing
    >> > maybe.

    >>
    >> This is indeed how it's supposed to be, with or without additional
    >> password checks for shutting down the machine from runlevel 5, depending
    >> on the chosen security level, KDE-specific security options and eventual
    >> customizations through tweaking of the PAM files.

    >
    > does this mean i should lower the settings of security ? ( in mcc,
    > its set as "Standard" right now)..


    Negative. The "standard" security level is already lax enough and is a good
    compromise for day-to-day desktop use by inexperienced users. You can
    however tweak your current security level into a "custom" level by means of
    the MCC; it allows you to make individual adjustments to the various
    settings, thereby increasing security or decreasing it, as you desire.
    Perhaps you can take a look there. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  12. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Oct 14, 10:19*pm, Aragorn wrote:
    > On Tuesday 14 October 2008 19:02, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    > in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Oct 14, 9:14*pm, Aragorn wrote:

    >
    > >> On Tuesday 14 October 2008 17:32, someone identifying as *Iordani* wrote
    > >> in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    >
    > >> > If I choose to start X (runlevel 5) directly at boot , *that is, *if I
    > >> > choose 'Launch the graphical environment when your system starts' in
    > >> > mcc / boot, *I will get the shutdown/reeboot/restart options when
    > >> > logging out.

    >
    > >> > If I choose to start into runlevel 3, *as I prefer, *I will not get
    > >> > those options. *Just an 'End this session' dialog. *So, *I don't think
    > >> > it's a kernel problem (even in MD 2009). *More like a security thing
    > >> > maybe.

    >
    > >> This is indeed how it's supposed to be, with or without additional
    > >> password checks for shutting down the machine from runlevel 5, depending
    > >> on the chosen security level, KDE-specific security options and eventual
    > >> customizations through tweaking of the PAM files.

    >
    > > does this mean *i should lower the settings of security ? ( in mcc,
    > > its set as "Standard" right now)..

    >
    > Negative. *The "standard" security level is already lax enough and is agood
    > compromise for day-to-day desktop use by inexperienced users. *You can
    > however tweak your current security level into a "custom" level by means of
    > the MCC; it allows you to make individual adjustments to the various
    > settings, thereby increasing security or decreasing it, as you desire.
    > Perhaps you can take a look there. ;-)
    >
    > --
    > *Aragorn*
    > (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)


    so you think the security levels are causing a problem ie. of not
    showing me shutdown options?

  13. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Tuesday 14 October 2008 19:44, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > On Oct 14, 10:19*pm, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >> On Tuesday 14 October 2008 19:02, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    >> in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/
    >>
    >> > On Oct 14, 9:14*pm, Aragorn wrote:

    >>
    >> >> This is indeed how it's supposed to be, with or without additional
    >> >> password checks for shutting down the machine from runlevel 5,
    >> >> depending on the chosen security level, KDE-specific security options
    >> >> and eventual customizations through tweaking of the PAM files.

    >>
    >> > does this mean *i should lower the settings of security ? ( in mcc,
    >> > its set as "Standard" right now)..

    >>
    >> Negative. *The "standard" security level is already lax enough and is a
    >> good compromise for day-to-day desktop use by inexperienced users. *You
    >> can however tweak your current security level into a "custom" level by
    >> means of the MCC; it allows you to make individual adjustments to the
    >> various settings, thereby increasing security or decreasing it, as you
    >> desire. Perhaps you can take a look there. ;-)

    >
    > so you think the security levels are causing a problem ie. of not
    > showing me shutdown options?


    If you consider that a problem... ;-) Regardless of the "must be like
    Windoze" junkies, I find that only the root user should be allowed to shut
    down the system anyway, and I make sure that with all my systems, it is set
    up that way.

    I even manually edit the PAM files if I have to, because
    the /halt,/ /poweroff/ and /reboot/ commands are actually symbolic links
    to /console-helper,/ which checks how it was called to take the appropriate
    actions and then checks with PAM to see who's allowed to do what.

    As always, newbies have to keep in mind that GNU/Linux is not a Windows
    alternative, it's an alternative to proprietary UNIX systems, and it would
    be a grave mistake - and disrespectful to the UNIX architecture - to try
    and make it behave as if it were Windows. But that's just me. :-)

    The "problem" - in your case - lies with the fact that Mandriva uses /msec/
    to maintain the security of your system, with predefined but customizable
    security levels. Normally, GNU/Linux does not work that way, and the
    conflict here is that KDE itself also has a number of security options with
    regard to who gets to shut down the system. These settings may not
    necessarily be in harmony with the Mandriva-specific /msec/ settings. And
    then you must add to the mix that the graphical login manager used by
    Mandriva is not the default KDE display manager but a /Mandriva-branded/
    version of it, which exists alongside the original one on your hard disk.

    Somehow somewhere, those different ways of modifying the security settings
    with regard to shutdown et al are not integrated too well on Mandriva due
    to the fact that they insist on their own /msec/ system, whereas other
    GNU/Linux distributions honor the /kdm/ version that comes with KDE and
    rely solely on permissions and PAM.

    Mandriva also uses a lot of needlessly /suid/ root executables - and always
    has - in order to facilitate such things as shutting down the machine by a
    regular user, and other similar implementations.

    Anyway, the above are all just my thoughts, and I know quite a few people
    who feel the same way about Mandriva. It's a great distro with lots of
    usability for the experienced and quite a userfriendly approach for the
    inexperienced, but it's not as (I and others feel) a distro should be.

    This is my opinion. Your mileage may vary, and you are welcome to your
    own. :-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  14. Re: laptop heats up fast

    > If you consider that a problem... ;-) *Regardless of the "must be like
    > Windoze" junkies, I find that only the root user should be allowed to shut
    > down the system anyway, and I make sure that with all my systems, it is set
    > up that way. *
    >


    I am the root and I am the only user of this laptop that I use. so i
    think i should be able to shutdown my system when I want.

    > As always, newbies have to keep in mind that GNU/Linux is not a Windows
    > alternative, it's an alternative to proprietary UNIX systems, and it would
    > be a grave mistake - and disrespectful to the UNIX architecture - to try
    > and make it behave as if it were Windows. *But that's just me. :-)


    Why are you giving me a window analogy here?

  15. Digression on nvidia drivers

    Sindhu wrote:
    > am using the laptop kernel currently, my friend said its okay to
    > switch to a desktop one or better yet use a stock kernel like
    > vanilla...although i will have to compile it myself..
    >
    > here are the kernels i have...
    >
    > [sindhu@laptop ~]$ ls /usr/src/
    > linux-2.6.24.4-desktop586-1mnb/ linux-2.6.27-desktop586-0.rc8.2mnb/
    > linux-2.6.24.5-desktop586-2mnb/ nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1/
    > linux-2.6.24.5-laptop-2mnb/ rpm/
    >
    > which one do i use among these for best performance? i cannot use
    > rc8.2mnb because i don't have the appropriate nvidia drivers for that
    > kernel, so i can't login to KDE if i boot through that kernel.
    >
    > should i get a stock kernel?


    First, run the command
    uname -a
    to see exactly what is running.

    Then, to see what packages are installed,
    rpm -qa |grep kernel

    The four directory names starting with linux above should be the
    devel packages for the respective kernels. They are not the kernels
    (ls -l /boot and look for vmlinuz* ) nor the complete source code.

    The nvidia=-current* is the package for compiling nvidia drivers for
    a new kernel. Normally this is done automatically by dkms when you
    boot up, but you can simply cd into the directory and,
    make module
    make install /*install must be done as root */

    This will build and install nvidia drivers for the kernel
    currently running. You may need to update /etc/X11/xorg.conf
    by hand, or the installer may ask you if you want it to update for
    you, or it may just work. I would make a backup copy of the
    file, just to be on the safe side:
    (as root in /ertc/X11) cp xorg.conf xorg.conf.20081014

    FWIW, on my 2008.1 system, I have both
    nvidia96xx-96.43.05-4mdv2008.1 package and
    nvidia-current-173.14.12-2mdv2008.1
    so it looks like you need to update your nvidia package from
    Mandriva, or download the nVidia version of the package from
    the nvidia website and run that.

    The easy way to do it, though, is simply run XFdrake, as root.
    If the system correctly identifies your hardware, this will ask you
    if you want the proprietary drivers and automagically download and
    install anything you need for the current running kernel. In some
    cases, it looks like XFdrake is misidentifying your nvidia card but
    that is a bug in most cases. Try it, and see if it works. If not,
    use XFdrake and set the configuration values manually and try again.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  16. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Wednesday 15 October 2008 04:39, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    >> If you consider that a problem... ;-) *Regardless of the "must be like
    >> Windoze" junkies, I find that only the root user should be allowed to
    >> shut down the system anyway, and I make sure that with all my systems, it
    >> is set up that way.

    >
    > I am the root and I am the only user of this laptop that I use. so i
    > think i should be able to shutdown my system when I want.


    Yes, but that is not what I was saying. I am saying that the ability
    shutdown should only be given to the root /account/ under normal
    circumstances.

    And either way, while it may be nice for some to use a GUI login screen, I
    think you'll find that there are plenty of reasons people can give you as
    to why runlevel 3 is better. And as such, you can issue a shutdown from
    the command prompt.

    >> As always, newbies have to keep in mind that GNU/Linux is not a Windows
    >> alternative, it's an alternative to proprietary UNIX systems, and it
    >> would be a grave mistake - and disrespectful to the UNIX architecture -
    >> to try and make it behave as if it were Windows. *But that's just me. :-)

    >
    > Why are you giving me a window analogy here?


    Because you are displaying signs of wanting your GNU/Linux to behave like
    Windows, where an unprivileged user account can still do privileged stuff.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  17. Re: laptop heats up fast

    Aragorn writes:

    >On Wednesday 15 October 2008 04:39, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    >in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/


    >>> If you consider that a problem... ;-) *Regardless of the "must be like
    >>> Windoze" junkies, I find that only the root user should be allowed to
    >>> shut down the system anyway, and I make sure that with all my systems, it
    >>> is set up that way.

    >>
    >> I am the root and I am the only user of this laptop that I use. so i
    >> think i should be able to shutdown my system when I want.


    You may.


    >Yes, but that is not what I was saying. I am saying that the ability
    >shutdown should only be given to the root /account/ under normal
    >circumstances.


    >And either way, while it may be nice for some to use a GUI login screen, I
    >think you'll find that there are plenty of reasons people can give you as
    >to why runlevel 3 is better. And as such, you can issue a shutdown from
    >the command prompt.


    Or do
    alt-ctrl-F2
    alt-ctrl-del


    >>> As always, newbies have to keep in mind that GNU/Linux is not a Windows
    >>> alternative, it's an alternative to proprietary UNIX systems, and it
    >>> would be a grave mistake - and disrespectful to the UNIX architecture -
    >>> to try and make it behave as if it were Windows. *But that's just me. :-)

    >>
    >> Why are you giving me a window analogy here?


    >Because you are displaying signs of wanting your GNU/Linux to behave like
    >Windows, where an unprivileged user account can still do privileged stuff.


  18. Re: laptop heats up fast

    > > Why are you giving me a window analogy here?
    >
    > Because you are displaying signs of wanting your GNU/Linux to behave like
    > Windows, where an unprivileged user account can still do privileged stuff.
    >


    being the root as well as user of a laptop is not a sign of windows-
    like behavior.

  19. Re: laptop heats up fast

    On Friday 17 October 2008 07:09, someone identifying as *Sindhu* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    >> > Why are you giving me a window analogy here?

    >>
    >> Because you are displaying signs of wanting your GNU/Linux to behave like
    >> Windows, where an unprivileged user account can still do privileged
    >> stuff.

    >
    > being the root as well as user of a laptop is not a sign of windows-
    > like behavior.


    I will grant you that a laptop is of course of a more personal nature than a
    desktop, workstation or server, but still, the more privileges you give to
    a regular user account, the bigger your chance at screwing up. And that is
    my point. :-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

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