help. - Mandriva

This is a discussion on help. - Mandriva ; i am using mandriva free. it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox or any other player. what to do? is it a virus? i am using kde, and gnome....

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: help.

  1. help.

    i am using mandriva free.
    it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    or any other player. what to do? is it a virus?
    i am using kde, and gnome.

  2. Re: help.

    Ascaron wrote:

    > i am using mandriva free.
    > it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    > or any other player. what to do? is it a virus?
    > i am using kde, and gnome.


    Ascaron

    I hesitate to ask such a basic question, but...

    Since it is *all* players that are affected, have you checked that your
    system volume has not been muted or set to a very low level by something
    that has happened on your system?

    Once you've checked that, could you please let us know what changes you've
    made to your system between now and when the sound stopped playing.

    HTH

    Rob

  3. Re: help.

    On Wed, 1 Oct 2008 02:46:46 -0700 (PDT), Ascaron wrote:

    > i am using mandriva free.


    That is nice.

    You might want to read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    Helps to tell us which "free" on what hardware/sound card.

    To tell us about "free", click up a terminal and show us contents of
    cat /etc/release

    Have you set your package mirrors, and have installed all updates?

    > it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    > or any other player. what to do?
    > is it a virus?


    If so, it would be the first of it's kind. :-(
    Pretty sure is it not. I assume you have setup your firewall and do
    not run as root.

    > i am using kde, and gnome.


    click up a terminal
    and run each player and see if there is an error message indicating
    what the problem is.


  4. Re: help.

    On Wednesday 01 October 2008 11:46, someone identifying as *Ascaron* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > i am using mandriva free.
    > it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    > or any other player.


    You've probably messed up some things in your settings, or possibly you've
    had an unclean shutdown of your computer, resulting in corrupted files
    and/or a corrupted filesystem.

    > what to do?


    Check the output of /dmesg/ - you'll need to /su/ to root in a terminal
    before you can do that - and check */var/log/messages* for clues.

    Start by clicking up a terminal window and type...

    su-

    .... and enter the root password. Next, type...

    dmesg | less

    Scroll through the text using the arrow keys and /Pgup/ and /PgDn./ Exit
    the pager with "q".

    Next, use /less/ to view */var/log/messages.* You'll probably have to
    scroll back to when things started going badly, but you can try the
    following command...

    tail -n 500 /var/log/messages | less

    This will bring up the last 500 lines of the file, filtered through
    the /less/ pager. Use the same method as before to page through the output
    and quit the pager.

    > is it a virus?


    There are no GNU/Linux viruses in the wild, and even if there were, the
    chances of your system getting infected with a virus would be very slim,
    considering how UNIX operating systems are designed. Viruses can infect
    Windows machines because Windows sucks bigtime as an operating system
    design and its security is completely bypassable (by design).

    You may however check your computer hardware, because it's not unlikely that
    the problem arises from there, ranging from overheating due to dust in the
    fans up to memory modules going bad.

    However, my bet is on an unclean shutdown and filesystem corruption.

    > i am using kde, and gnome.


    Irrelevant.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  5. Re: help.

    Bit Twister wrote:

    > On Wed, 1 Oct 2008 02:46:46 -0700 (PDT), Ascaron wrote:
    >
    >> i am using mandriva free.

    >
    > That is nice.
    >
    > You might want to read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html



    I must admit I was tempted to make a similar comment, but I bit my tongue
    and decided to be a bit more tolerant than I might otherwise be... Mind
    you, if I see this character around again asking such general questions
    with no details and evidence of a bit of prior thought I could easily be
    persuaded to change my approach ;-)

    Rob.

  6. Re: help.

    Ascaron wrote:

    > i am using mandriva free.


    ....why you post from windows then?
    just curious...
    santo

    X-HTTP-UserAgent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1;
    SV1),gzip(gfe),gzip(gfe)

  7. Re: help.

    Aragorn wrote:


    > Check the output of /dmesg/ - you'll need to /su/ to root in a terminal
    > before you can do that - and check */var/log/messages* for clues.
    >


    A small trivia,... if I may...
    at least for dmesg one does not need to be root...

    santo

  8. Re: help.

    On Wednesday 01 October 2008 16:56, someone identifying as *santo* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Check the output of /dmesg/ - you'll need to /su/ to root in a terminal
    >> before you can do that - and check */var/log/messages* for clues.

    >
    >
    > A small trivia,... if I may...
    > at least for dmesg one does not need to be root...


    Then this has changed, because normally, root access is required, and so it
    should be. Only the root user should have access to what's in the kernel
    ring buffer, because it may hold sensitive data, e.g. encryption keys.

    I suppose it may however depend on the chosen security level during
    installation.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  9. Re: help.

    On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 17:21:31 +0200, Aragorn wrote:

    > On Wednesday 01 October 2008 16:56, someone identifying as *santo* wrote
    > in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/
    >
    >> Aragorn wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Check the output of /dmesg/ - you'll need to /su/ to root in a
    >>> terminal before you can do that - and check */var/log/messages* for
    >>> clues.

    >>
    >>
    >> A small trivia,... if I may...
    >> at least for dmesg one does not need to be root...

    >
    > Then this has changed,


    Nope.

    > because normally, root access is required,


    Nope.

    > and so it should be.


    ????

    > Only the root user should have access to what's in the
    > kernel ring buffer, because it may hold sensitive data, e.g. encryption
    > keys.


    It's called dmesg because it produces the message log as obtained from
    the kernel message buffer. The fact that this buffer has a ring
    structure is not particularly relevant.

    Your assertion is an interesting one, however. Do you have an example or
    any references to suggest that the kernel message buffer acquires and
    stores encryption keys?

    > I suppose it may however depend on the chosen security level during
    > installation.


    Nope. Lots of distros don't even let you choose a security level at
    installation.

    I have never seen a distro that requires one to be root to see the output
    of dmesg. If anyone knows of one I'd be interested to hear about it.

  10. Re: help.

    On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 20:02:30 +1000, Rob wrote:
    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 1 Oct 2008 02:46:46 -0700 (PDT), Ascaron wrote:
    >>
    >>> i am using mandriva free.

    >>
    >> That is nice.
    >>
    >> You might want to read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    >
    >
    > I must admit I was tempted to make a similar comment, but I bit my tongue
    > and decided to be a bit more tolerant than I might otherwise be... Mind
    > you, if I see this character around again asking such general questions
    > with no details and evidence of a bit of prior thought I could easily be
    > persuaded to change my approach ;-)


    Why would most people even bother to open a posting with Subject: help. ??
    My slrn scorce file takes care of these. Maybe now's the time to include
    the "Re:" variants....

    Jonesy

  11. Re: help.

    On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 02:46:46 -0700, Ascaron wrote:

    > i am using mandriva free.
    > it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    > or any other player. what to do? is it a virus?
    > i am using kde, and gnome.


    Format your hard drive, and go back to windoze.

    X-HTTP-UserAgent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1

    Oh. You're already there. In that case, bugger off.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  12. Re: help.

    Ascaron wrote:

    > i am using mandriva free.
    > it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    > or any other player. what to do? is it a virus?
    > i am using kde, and gnome.


    Suggest you try the following:
    If you have did your installation using "expert mode" and then "auto
    allocate", "with /usr" do the following:
    Insert the Mandriva disk and select install, go through the prompts and
    when you get to the part that asks you if you want to "install"
    or "upgrade", select "upgrade" and continue, This won't take long and if
    you originally installed as above, the upgrade will not affect your data
    nor your configuration.
    I have never installed with just one partition so I don't know if in that
    case the "upgrade" will affect your data and configuration.
    The additional advantage of doing the "expert mode" with "auto allocae"
    with "/usr" is that you can actually do an "install" using "existing
    partitions" (/, /usr and /home) then formatting only the "/" and "/usr"
    thereby keeping your "/home" untoutched.
    Try it
    --
    Rgds.
    Edward
    Registered Linux User No. 224802

  13. Re: help.

    Ascaron wrote:

    > is it a virus?


    You haven't really given enough detail to discover what's wrong. Check the
    obvious - have *you* muted the audio? Check the settings.

    It's certainly *not* a "virus". Malware like that only applies to Windows.



  14. Re: help.

    On Wednesday 01 October 2008 18:27, someone identifying as *Mark Madsen*
    wrote in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 17:21:31 +0200, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >> Then this has changed,because normally, root access is required,
    >> and so it should be.

    >
    > ????


    For security reasons. ;-)

    >> Only the root user should have access to what's in the kernel ring
    >> buffer, because it may hold sensitive data, e.g. encryption keys.

    >
    > It's called dmesg because it produces the message log as obtained from
    > the kernel message buffer. The fact that this buffer has a ring
    > structure is not particularly relevant.


    It's just nomenclature. Don't read more into it than what it says. ;-)

    > Your assertion is an interesting one, however. Do you have an example or
    > any references to suggest that the kernel message buffer acquires and
    > stores encryption keys?


    Well, if you've ever configured a kernel yourself, you could perhaps have
    seen that there is an option to have encryption keys stored in the kernel
    ring buffer itself for convenience, but the information with that option
    does of course warn for the possible consequences of using this technology
    without the necessary precautions.

    I do not know whether Mandriva's kernels have this option enabled or not,
    though.

    >> I suppose it may however depend on the chosen security level during
    >> installation.

    >
    > Nope. Lots of distros don't even let you choose a security level at
    > installation.


    Well, the distribution in question here is Mandriva, and Mandriva uses
    security levels. Other distros indeed do not have those, but then again
    they are usually set up securely enough, whereas Mandriva dissects the
    individual security protocols and spreads them out over levels of varying
    security.

    For instance, on Gentoo, typing...

    halt

    .... or...

    reboot

    .... in a console as an unprivileged user won't do anything, except perhaps
    tell you that you need root access in order to do that. On Mandriva, in
    all security levels below three - and possibly level three included, but I
    can't tell as I've manually edited the PAM files myself - the machine will
    shutdown or reboot without giving you any fuss, even if you're only an
    unprivileged user.

    > I have never seen a distro that requires one to be root to see the output
    > of dmesg. If anyone knows of one I'd be interested to hear about it.


    As I recall, all my previous Mandrake versions - but as I checked yesterday,
    not this one anymore, apparently - did require root access to see the
    output of /dmesg./ Now this distro here is Mandrake 10.0 - yeah, it's a
    dinosaur - so it's possible that as of 10.0 on, Mandrake/Mandriva have
    changed that policy.

    I started using Mandrake 6.0 PowerPack as my first GNU/Linux distribution
    late 1999, and up until 9.2, each and every one of them with a "medium" or
    "standard" security level set - which for me has either way always been
    level three - did in fact require root access in order to use /dmesg./

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  15. Re: help.

    On Wednesday 01 October 2008 23:10, someone identifying as *Dan C* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 02:46:46 -0700, Ascaron wrote:
    >
    >> i am using mandriva free.
    >> it was working fine, but now amarok doesn't work, nor does rhythmbox
    >> or any other player. what to do? is it a virus?
    >> i am using kde, and gnome.

    >
    > Format your hard drive, and go back to windoze.
    >
    > X-HTTP-UserAgent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1
    >
    > Oh. You're already there. In that case, bugger off.


    Don't you love September? :-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

+ Reply to Thread