/var full - Mandriva

This is a discussion on /var full - Mandriva ; When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. ...

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  1. /var full

    When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I
    expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB
    mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. It
    didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command that will tell me the
    (say) 10 largest files within the directory/subdirectories, including
    hidden ones?



  2. Re: /var full

    Alan Secker wrote:

    > When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I
    > expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB
    > mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. It
    > didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command that will tell me the
    > (say) 10 largest files within the directory/sub directories, including
    > hidden ones?


    While I would still like a solution to my question, I ought to add that
    since posting my first message, I closed down and rebooted, to find that I
    now had 5.3GB in /var. I thought re-booting was unnecessary under Linux?



  3. Re: /var full

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:10:49 -0400, Alan Secker wrote:

    > While I would still like a solution to my question, I ought to add that
    > since posting my first message, I closed down and rebooted, to find that I
    > now had 5.3GB in /var. I thought re-booting was unnecessary under Linux?


    kdirstat is a very usefull program for finding large files, or directories
    with lots of small files. For command line, try "du -ab|sort -g".

    The reboot must have shut down a process with a large file in /var/tmp, or
    similar location. Stopping whatever the process was, would have had the
    same effect, without rebooting.

    One thing to be aware of, is truly hidden files. For example, I use a seperate
    file system for /var/log, which is normally auto mounted, at boot time. If,
    for some reason, the mount fails, the logs will be written in the /var/log
    directory, which will be in whichever filesystem /var is in. I then fix
    the problem that stopped /var/log from mounting, and reboot. Once the directory
    /var/log gets used as a mount point, all of the files that were written to it,
    will be inaccessible, but still taking up space. The only way to delete those
    files, is to unmount the filesystem first.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  4. Re: /var full

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 22:10:49 +0100,
    Alan Secker wrote:

    > Alan Secker wrote:
    >
    > > When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As
    > > I expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found
    > > a 3.6GB mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I
    > > deleted it. It didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command
    > > that will tell me the (say) 10 largest files within the
    > > directory/sub directories, including hidden ones?


    Try this:

    du -xab | sort -nr | head -n10

    Note that this will list directories as well as individual files. A nice
    X-based app to let you see this sort of thing visually is "fsv"; you'd
    need to run it as root (using sudo from a user terminal, presumably) in
    order to be able to use it to examine the contents of /var. Like so:

    $ sudo urpmi fsv
    $ sudo fsv /var

    > While I would still like a solution to my question, I ought to add
    > that since posting my first message, I closed down and rebooted, to
    > find that I now had 5.3GB in /var. I thought re-booting was
    > unnecessary under Linux?


    You mentioned that you were "not using MythTV at present", but was the
    mythtvbackend service running? If so, then despite the fact that you had
    deleted the log file, the mythtvbackend daemon would have still had it
    open, so the disk space it was using was not released until the reboot
    (which stopped that service, along with all other ones). Stopping just
    the mythtvbackend service, before or after deleting the log file, would
    have accomplished the same thing without a reboot.

    HTH!

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  5. Re: /var full

    Alan Secker writes:

    >When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I
    >expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB
    >mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. It
    >didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command that will tell me the


    Something has the file open. A file disappears ONLY when all programs that
    have the file open either close it or the program quits. Find out which
    program is using the file and shut down that program.

    Apparently you are using mythTV at the moment.

    (If you cannot find the file, shutdown the computer. That will stop the
    program for sure. )

    >(say) 10 largest files within the directory/subdirectories, including
    >hidden ones?




  6. Re: /var full

    Alan Secker writes:

    >Alan Secker wrote:


    >> When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I
    >> expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB
    >> mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. It
    >> didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command that will tell me the
    >> (say) 10 largest files within the directory/sub directories, including
    >> hidden ones?


    >While I would still like a solution to my question, I ought to add that
    >since posting my first message, I closed down and rebooted, to find that I
    >now had 5.3GB in /var. I thought re-booting was unnecessary under Linux?


    It is. But it is a guarenteed way of stopping the program that had the file
    open. Easier is to close the program itself.
    ..



  7. Re: /var full

    Bill Mullen wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 22:10:49 +0100,
    > Alan Secker wrote:
    >
    >> Alan Secker wrote:
    >>
    >> > When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As
    >> > I expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found
    >> > a 3.6GB mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I
    >> > deleted it. It didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command
    >> > that will tell me the (say) 10 largest files within the
    >> > directory/sub directories, including hidden ones?

    >
    > Try this:
    >
    > du -xab | sort -nr | head -n10
    >
    > Note that this will list directories as well as individual files. A nice
    > X-based app to let you see this sort of thing visually is "fsv"; you'd
    > need to run it as root (using sudo from a user terminal, presumably) in
    > order to be able to use it to examine the contents of /var. Like so:
    >
    > $ sudo urpmi fsv
    > $ sudo fsv /var
    >
    >> While I would still like a solution to my question, I ought to add
    >> that since posting my first message, I closed down and rebooted, to
    >> find that I now had 5.3GB in /var. I thought re-booting was
    >> unnecessary under Linux?

    >
    > You mentioned that you were "not using MythTV at present", but was the
    > mythtvbackend service running? If so, then despite the fact that you had
    > deleted the log file, the mythtvbackend daemon would have still had it
    > open, so the disk space it was using was not released until the reboot
    > (which stopped that service, along with all other ones). Stopping just
    > the mythtvbackend service, before or after deleting the log file, would
    > have accomplished the same thing without a reboot.


    Yes I spotted that as soon as I saw the file. I disabled that (and one or
    two other unwanted items as well)!
    >
    > HTH!
    >



  8. Re: /var full

    Unruh wrote:

    > Alan Secker writes:
    >
    >>When vmware wouldn't start a guest, I checked the var partition. As I
    >>expected, it was full, I looked for a suspect log file and found a 3.6GB
    >>mythtvbackend log. I'm not using MythTV at present so I deleted it. It
    >>didn't help. /var is still full. Is there a command that will tell me the

    >
    > Something has the file open. A file disappears ONLY when all programs that
    > have the file open either close it or the program quits. Find out which
    > program is using the file and shut down that program.
    >
    > Apparently you are using mythTV at the moment.
    >
    > (If you cannot find the file, shutdown the computer. That will stop the
    > program for sure. )
    >
    >>(say) 10 largest files within the directory/subdirectories, including
    >>hidden ones?


    I'm not using MythTV as the set-up drives me mad. I'm usoing Kaffiene which
    wasa trouble free. You are quite right of course.

    Thank you and everyone else who has been so helpful.

    Regards, Alan Secker


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