connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused - Mandriva

This is a discussion on connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused - Mandriva ; On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:11:30 +0000, Maurice Batey wrote: On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:11:30 +0000, Maurice Batey wrote: > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 21:47:37 +0000, I wrote: > >> I am going to experiment with a 'static' ...

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Thread: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

  1. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:11:30 +0000, Maurice Batey wrote:

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:11:30 +0000, Maurice Batey wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 21:47:37 +0000, I wrote:
    >
    >> I am going to experiment with a 'static' nic setup, using an
    >> installation of PCLinuxOS I happen to have on an external drive.

    >
    > Looked into that, and found that another set of similar fields
    > would have to be changed in the router (Netgear DG834G), and as I'm not
    > 100% sure of the changes I have shelved the idea for the time being, not
    > wanting to change a setup that has performed flawlessly for over a year
    > - yet.


    Why don't you just avoid this crap all together and assign a static IP
    address to the desktop machine, or both for that matter. Then it won't
    matter which is boot first, last, or in between a hundred other machines.
    It will always have the same IP address. Check your router to see what it
    allows for dhcp and change it to a small block like 192.168.0.200-250 and
    leave the other addresses for static ip's.

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  2. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:24:59 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:

    > If it were me, I'd still configure the desktop to use a manual static IP
    > address and to not use DHCP, while setting up both systems in the router
    > to be able to get their correct address via DHCP on that screen. This
    > way. even if the router settings are lost for some reason (prolonged
    > power outage, whatever), at least you can be sure that the desktop will
    > *always* boot up with the right IP address, regardless.


    Now I'm getting confused!

    As I understand it, the router will have some addresses reserved for dhcp,
    and may have some static addresses reserved for specific MACs.

    On the computer, if the router has it's MAC address in the static table, then
    the NIC should be configured, as static, with the same ip address.

    On the computer, if the router does not have the MAC address, then the NIC
    should be configured to use DHCP.

    Can the computer be configured to use DHCP, and have the MAC address specified
    as static in the router?

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
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  3. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > I would expect the ip address would have to be outside of the range that
    > the router has reserved for dhcp addresses.


    Under "Use router as DHCP server" it shows:

    Start IP address: 192.168.0.2
    End IP address: 192.168.0.254

    > If the router will allow you to specify an address inside the
    > range used for dhcp, I'm not sure if the computer will still
    > be able to use dhcp, or if it will have to be configured, as
    > static. Shouldn't hurt to go ahead and try it.


    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
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  4. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > you could increase the dhcp lease expires timeout. It's
    > probably set at around 24 hours right now.


    Where the devil is that to be found?!
    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
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  5. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 14:00:31 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    > Now I'm getting confused!
    >
    > As I understand it, the router will have some addresses reserved for dhcp,
    > and may have some static addresses reserved for specific MACs.
    >
    > On the computer, if the router has it's MAC address in the static table, then
    > the NIC should be configured, as static, with the same ip address.
    >
    > On the computer, if the router does not have the MAC address, then the NIC
    > should be configured to use DHCP.
    >
    > Can the computer be configured to use DHCP, and have the MAC address specified
    > as static in the router?


    Heheheh, you configure the computer to use DHCP. It always gets the
    lease from the router. You tell the router that for a given MAC id, send
    a given ip address. The computer does not care.

    In Maurice's case he seems to always ssh from laptop to desktop.

    He can set desktop's nic as static 192.168.0.100 or dhcp and
    tell the router to send 192.168.0.2 when it sees desktop's mac.

    With just static 192.168.0.100, a factory reset on the router will not
    affect desktop. With 192.168.0.2 assigned by MAC, a factory reset will
    loose the setting and assign the next ip to desktop.


  6. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:

    I sure do wish you would tell Opera to automagically line wrap at
    something less than or equal to 72 characters.
    That would leave at least a little more room for reply depth indicators.



    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:35:05 -0400, Maurice Batey wrote:
    >
    >> (When I asked the router to show me the 'Add' template, it
    >> automatically showed the MAC and IP address of the desktop, but
    >> for 'Device name' it shows 'Unknown'. What should go there?)

    >
    > Whatever you want. The name in the router setup, is only to help you remember
    > which machine is which. It isn't used in any traffic routing. You could
    > enter "Desktop", or "Main", or even leave it blank.


    A little cation note there.
    If Maurice does not want the desktop's node name to become Main, he
    may want to remember to set Need Hostname = no during nic configuration.

  7. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 17:35:05 +0000 (UTC),
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:24:59 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:
    >
    > > Enter the hostnames, MAC
    > > addresses, and chosen static IP addresses for your systems there

    >
    > What 'hostname' is that?
    >
    > (When I asked the router to show me the 'Add' template, it
    > automatically showed the MAC and IP address of the desktop, but
    > for 'Device name' it shows 'Unknown'. What should go there?)


    Were it me, I'd put the same name there that you have configured each
    system to use as its hostname. IME, some routers that provide DNS to
    the LAN will use this setting to let you resolve names properly that do
    not appear in /etc/hosts on the local machine, and other routers will
    ignore the name used here entirely. Which is the case for yours won't
    really matter, since you're going to make sure that all local systems'
    hosts files are the same anyway. All it would affect is whether or not
    any other system that is temporarily connected can still resolve local
    names to local IP addresses, using only the DNS provided by the router.

    > Do you mean if I set the router up with that table that there is
    > no functional need to change the DHCP setup in MCC?


    That is exactly what I mean. However, as I stated before, I'd change the
    desktop's config to not use DHCP, although I'd also set up that table
    on the router to have an entry for the desktop, so that if it did use
    DHCP for some reason, it would still get the correct IP address.

    Remember, when choosing addresses to use in this table, select ones that
    fall outside the range that the router uses for the ones that *it* picks
    (the ones that aren't pre-assigned this way). IOW, if the router's
    usual range for handing out DHCP addresses is x.x.x.100 - x.x.x.200,
    select ones that are x.x.x.y (where 1 < y < 100, or 200 < y < 255).

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  8. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:08:57 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    >> I would expect the ip address would have to be outside of the range that
    >> the router has reserved for dhcp addresses.

    >
    > Under "Use router as DHCP server" it shows:
    >
    > Start IP address: 192.168.0.2
    > End IP address: 192.168.0.254


    Except for .0. it looks about like mine.

    I just use .100+ ips on my machines. If you wanted to do it right, you
    would change End IP address: to 192.168.0.99 and the router's DHCP
    server would not hand out leases greater than .99

    In my case I did not change anything in the router.
    If the router has assigned more that 99 leases, it could assign .100
    to the next computer and I would have two systems on the network with
    ..100 and start having problems.


  9. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:08:57 +0000 (UTC),
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    > > I would expect the ip address would have to be outside of the range
    > > that the router has reserved for dhcp addresses.

    >
    > Under "Use router as DHCP server" it shows:
    >
    > Start IP address: 192.168.0.2
    > End IP address: 192.168.0.254


    Assuming that you can change those settings, make it pick from a smaller
    range; for example, set the first one to 192.168.0.100. If you can't
    change it, then don't worry about it, since presumably having a static
    address set (in the other router screen) would ensure that it will never
    give that same address out to another system dynamically.

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  10. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:13:00 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    >> you could increase the dhcp lease expires timeout. It's
    >> probably set at around 24 hours right now.

    >
    > Where the devil is that to be found?!


    You would think it would be in the router's User Manual.

    I know I had to get the manual from the Vendor's site to see where
    I could change what for what reason in my router.

  11. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:19:45 +0000 (UTC),
    Bit Twister wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    > > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:35:05 -0400, Maurice Batey
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> (When I asked the router to show me the 'Add' template, it
    > >> automatically showed the MAC and IP address of the desktop, but
    > >> for 'Device name' it shows 'Unknown'. What should go there?)

    > >
    > > Whatever you want. The name in the router setup, is only to help
    > > you remember which machine is which. It isn't used in any traffic
    > > routing. You could enter "Desktop", or "Main", or even leave it
    > > blank.

    >
    > A little cation note there.
    > If Maurice does not want the desktop's node name to become Main, he
    > may want to remember to set Need Hostname = no during nic
    > configuration.


    Another good reason to ensure that the name used in the router setup
    matches the system's own hostname - to avoid that sort of problem.

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  12. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 14:32:02 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:19:45 +0000 (UTC),
    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >>
    >> A little cation note there.
    >> If Maurice does not want the desktop's node name to become Main, he
    >> may want to remember to set Need Hostname = no during nic
    >> configuration.

    >
    > Another good reason to ensure that the name used in the router setup
    > matches the system's own hostname - to avoid that sort of problem.


    Having had two router downloads pushed into my router from my ISP,
    the ISP change my DNS settings in my router and one router replacement,
    I find my connection maintenance has gone away since I set the
    computer connections as static. :-D



  13. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:30:41 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > You would think it would be in the router's User Manual.


    I did a preliminary check in the router info but could see no
    mention of it.

    Will have another, closer, perusal tomorrow...

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  14. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 14:00:31 -0400,
    David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:24:59 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:
    >
    > > If it were me, I'd still configure the desktop to use a manual
    > > static IP address and to not use DHCP, while setting up both
    > > systems in the router to be able to get their correct address via
    > > DHCP on that screen. This way. even if the router settings are lost
    > > for some reason (prolonged power outage, whatever), at least you
    > > can be sure that the desktop will *always* boot up with the right
    > > IP address, regardless.

    >
    > Now I'm getting confused!
    >
    > As I understand it, the router will have some addresses reserved for
    > dhcp, and may have some static addresses reserved for specific MACs.
    >
    > On the computer, if the router has it's MAC address in the static
    > table, then the NIC should be configured, as static, with the same ip
    > address.


    This is not strictly necessary. If the NIC uses DHCP, and the router
    has a static IP address assigned to said NIC based on its MAC address,
    then that same IP address is the one that the router should give it,
    whether or not the address is in the router's usual DHCP address range.
    If not, then the router is more brain-dead than any I've yet used (that
    are capable of MAC-based IP address assignment at all).

    That being said, it makes the most sense to me to set it up as static in
    both places for any systems that are staying put 24/7. And I'll be the
    first to admit that there are an awful lot of routers out there that I
    haven't encountered, and given that they're low-profit-margin devices
    to begin with, there's every reason for me to expect that quite a few of
    them are bound to be precisely that brain-dead.

    > On the computer, if the router does not have the MAC address, then
    > the NIC should be configured to use DHCP.


    No, the NIC can always be configured for a static address with no regard
    whatsoever to how the router is set up; the only real concern is that
    when one sets up static IP addresses about which the router is unaware,
    said addresses should not fall within the range used by the router's
    pool of DHCP addresses, so that there's no potential for conflicts.

    > Can the computer be configured to use DHCP, and have the MAC address
    > specified as static in the router?


    It should be able to be, IME, if the router is capable of static IP
    address reservation at all. I find that especially handy for giving
    devices like networked printers predictable IP addys when I don't want
    to bother with figuring out how to get them to not use DHCP. You just
    want to bear in mind that router settings can go missing for any number
    of reasons, which is why I feel that setting up each non-mobile system
    with a (matching) static IP address within that system's own NIC config
    is always worthwhile, IMHO. Likewise for laptops that use wireless - the
    wireless settings are LAN-specific, so setting them up as static IP for
    when you're home has no effect on which method is used when elsewhere;
    it's only their wired NICs that are more convenient to leave as DHCP.

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  15. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:04:04 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:

    > That being said, it makes the most sense to me to set it up as static in
    > both places for any systems that are staying put 24/7. And I'll be the
    > first to admit that there are an awful lot of routers out there that I
    > haven't encountered, and given that they're low-profit-margin devices
    > to begin with, there's every reason for me to expect that quite a few of
    > them are bound to be precisely that brain-dead.


    Not to mention crackable from a malware infested web page you might
    browse. :-(
    http://www.haveyougotwoods.com/archi...ters-only.aspx
    http://www.darkreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=156741

  16. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    Maurice Batey wrote:
    > I had assumed that as a laptop is sometimes away from base,
    > it should not have a static IP address in case it clashes
    > with another server's static IP address.
    >
    >> In the router configuration, find the table of MAC/IP
    >> addresses, for static assignment.

    >
    > I can find the MAC's for the desktop and laptop, and under
    > - "LAN IP Setup" - an empty table headed "Address Reservation"
    > with column headers:
    >
    > IP address Device name MAC address
    >
    > which is presumably what you refer to.
    >
    >> Hope this helps to clarify things.


    I have used a couple of D-Link routers and one Actiontec.
    Using them, I would set the MAC for a machine to a static
    ip (192.168.0.3 or whatever) in the router, and let the
    machine simply request dhcp.

    When the router got the request, it would look at the
    MAC and assign the specified static ip. Setting the
    machine to the specified static IP would not have hurt
    (in a fixed environment), but it was not needed. I
    think you can handle your laptop the same way.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  17. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    Bit Twister wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 18:08:57 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    >> On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:52:40 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >>
    >>> I would expect the ip address would have to be outside of the range that
    >>> the router has reserved for dhcp addresses.

    >> Under "Use router as DHCP server" it shows:
    >>
    >> Start IP address: 192.168.0.2
    >> End IP address: 192.168.0.254

    >
    > Except for .0. it looks about like mine.
    >
    > I just use .100+ ips on my machines. If you wanted to do it right, you
    > would change End IP address: to 192.168.0.99 and the router's DHCP
    > server would not hand out leases greater than .99
    >
    > In my case I did not change anything in the router.
    > If the router has assigned more that 99 leases, it could assign .100
    > to the next computer and I would have two systems on the network with
    > .100 and start having problems.
    >


    This requires that the static ip for a machine be set
    in the router and in the machine's software.

    For home-use routers (I suspect commercial network
    routers should work differently), you can assign an
    ip from the router's dhcp range to a mac, and then
    let the machine with that mac simply request dhcp
    service. It will be assigned the specified static ip.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  18. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    David W. Hodgins wrote:
    > Can the computer be configured to use DHCP, and have the MAC address specified
    > as static in the router?
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins


    Using the routers handed out by Verizon for ADSL, FIOS Internet, and
    FIOS Internet + FIOS TV, the answer has been yes.

    I specify the mac address and corresponding ip in the router as
    static, and set the machine software to dhcp, and the static address
    is provided whenever the machine needs it.

    One problem with the Actiontec router (internet+tv), has been that
    the router seems to forget that a mac/ip pair has been specified as
    static. I think that has been due to the firmware on the router
    being updated, or the router reset from the Verizon server. In such
    cases, having the static IP set both in the router and on the machine
    provides the effect of wearing a belt plus suspenders.

    For my wife's laptop, her connection to the local AP network is
    static IP, but she has the option of connecting to any net her
    machine can find in the area. That requires having two networks
    configured for wireless, but it works.

    Cheers!

    jim b.


    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  19. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 19:45:18 -0400, Jim Beard wrote:

    > you can assign an
    > ip from the router's dhcp range to a mac, and then let the machine with
    > that mac simply request dhcp service. It will be assigned the specified
    > static ip.


    This is what I have now done, and it all seems to work well.

    Bill Allen was right about the 'Device name' field of the
    router's MAC table, which allows for only 15 characters (not
    enough for the stronger FDQNs) and is obviously there just to
    provide a reminder of which device the entry is for.

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

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