connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused - Mandriva

This is a discussion on connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused - Mandriva ; On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:55:57 +0100, Maurice Batey wrote: > >> No, changes/debugging to that fancy .deny script needed. > > The problem is that in your posting of that script the text > appears split up all over ...

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Thread: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

  1. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:55:57 +0100, Maurice Batey wrote:
    >
    >> No, changes/debugging to that fancy .deny script needed.

    >
    > The problem is that in your posting of that script the text
    > appears split up all over the place,


    Change news reader then. :-D


    > so that it's difficult to
    > see how it is supposed to precisely fit together.


    Hey, use google to get a second opinion on the code.

    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.o...881519c0d3af38

    > (I printed it out and pored over it, but even then I couldn't
    > make it gell...)


    Not much to pore over. It uses tcpwrappers % EXPANSIONS adds new line
    characters (\n), line continuation char (\) and feed it to mail.

    >> You change a line in /etc/postfix/aliases,

    >
    > But I don't use postfix; not installed. Happy with KMail.


    M=Mail
    T=Transport
    A=Agent
    C=Client

    Postfix is an MTA and KMail is a MTC.
    The MTC sends/fetches email from a MTA.

    Guessing in your case you told KMail to use your ISP's MTA.
    You would then ask KMail to also fetch mail from desktop
    for mab on desktop.

    > Perhaps there's a way of throwing some warning panel onto the
    > screen instead?


    Well, on that topic, I tend to use xmessage to send pop up messages.
    Downside :0.0 is the first user's screen to login.


    Two examples to send a pop up and keep going.

    xmessage -display :0.0 "sample pop up" &



    nohup xmessage -display :0.0 "

    installation of firefox-3.0.1.tar.bz2

    failed extract/install, install aborted
    " &


    A simple pop up, and wait for mouse click

    xmessage -display :0.0 "sample pop up"

    man xmessage for more switches.
    man X For -display usage


    Heheheheh, that reminds me, I helped set a co-worker up with linux
    and be able to dial up into work.

    One evening after work, I had dialed in, and noticed him dialed in.

    I got his ip address and did a

    xeyes &
    xeyes -display x.x.x.x:0 -fg yellow -center red

    I could move my mouse around and know what his xeyes was doing.
    About two seconds later I get connection broken when he panicked
    and shut down his system. 8-)

  2. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:55:57 +0100, Maurice Batey wrote:

    > Perhaps there's a way of throwing some warning panel onto the
    > screen instead?


    You can, but that would only be host.deny email.

    You would not know about cron failures or mail from system cron jobs
    which audit/warn root about problems.


  3. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 13:29:52 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > The hosts files are wrong.
    > Change the hosts file (on both systems) to show what ifconfig shows.


    Which I did, and ssh then worked.

    However, today when I tried ssh, it failed.

    When I checked ipconfig I saw that the 'inet' address had
    changed back to the IP address that was reflected in the earlier
    'incorrect' /etc/hosts file!

    Using the latest inet IP address, ssh works again...

    So - what can be causing the inet address to change (and how can
    a steady state be achieved)?

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  4. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:41:33 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > Change news reader then


    I have now, from old Pan to new Pan (used for posting this)!

    Script looks a little less daunting. It's also the link up with
    mailing that puts me off.

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  5. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 13:50:17 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    > On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 13:29:52 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    >> The hosts files are wrong.
    >> Change the hosts file (on both systems) to show what ifconfig shows.

    >
    > Which I did, and ssh then worked.
    >
    > However, today when I tried ssh, it failed.
    >
    > When I checked ipconfig I saw that the 'inet' address had
    > changed back to the IP address that was reflected in the earlier
    > 'incorrect' /etc/hosts file!
    >
    > Using the latest inet IP address, ssh works again...
    >
    > So - what can be causing the inet address to change


    dhcp lease renew not being received at dhcp server.
    dhcp lease renew not being sent to dhcp server.
    Turning off the node and loosing the lease.

    > (and how can a steady state be achieved)?


    Set connection as static. :-)

  6. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 14:32:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > dhcp lease renew not being received at dhcp server.
    > dhcp lease renew not being sent to dhcp server.
    > Turning off the node and loosing the lease.


    How does one prevent those happening?

    >> [quoted text muted]

    >
    > Set connection as static.


    My ISP did give me a static external IP address, but the 'inet'
    address is a local address, isn't it?
    How does setting 'connection' as static affect inet address?

    I mean, if DHCP always yields the same fixed IP address, why
    would the inet address change?

    W.r.t. setting connection address static, all the comments I've
    seen in various fora seemed to lean towards the DHCP approach
    as more secure.

    As a matter iof interest, what is involved in making the
    conection static?





    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  7. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 14:44:08 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 14:32:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    >> dhcp lease renew not being received at dhcp server.
    >> dhcp lease renew not being sent to dhcp server.
    >> Turning off the node and loosing the lease.

    >
    > How does one prevent those happening?


    Connect systems to an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS),
    fix the problem preventing the handshake between dhcp server and your
    system.


    > My ISP did give me a static external IP address, but the 'inet'
    > address is a local address, isn't it?


    Hmmm, how about, it is the address assigned to the nic.


    > How does setting 'connection' as static affect inet address?


    nic always has the same address so it is static.

    > I mean, if DHCP always yields the same fixed IP address,


    How can you say that. You already have proof your dhcp server has not
    issued the same same ip address to desktop at least two times already.

    > why would the inet address change?


    I refer you back to top of this reply.

    > W.r.t. setting connection address static, all the comments I've
    > seen in various fora seemed to lean towards the DHCP approach
    > as more secure.


    Hmm. Let's see, cracker manages to get a connection/lease on your LAN
    through your wifi router and then manages to cause desktop to reboot.
    While desktop reboot is going goes on,
    sends a fake lease release for desktop's ip address,
    send a lease release for his node, ask for a new connection and getting
    desktop's old address.
    Now all your systems think they are talking with desktop.

    > As a matter iof interest, what is involved in making the
    > conection static?


    Get into MCC, delete the network connection, create the connection,
    pick manual/static instead automatic/dhcp and provide an ip address.

    Suggest 192.168.0.100
    gatway 192.168.0.1
    DNS 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220
    host name desktop.unregistered.invalid

    As always, check your admin diary to see if there are any custom
    changes you make by hand.

    Example found in your admin diary.

    Network Changes
    Modified /etc/sysconfig/network to look as follows:
    NETWORKING_IPV6=no
    NOZEROCONF=yes
    NEEDHOSTNAME=no
    NETWORKING=yes
    HOSTNAME=desktop.unregistered.invalid


  8. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 15:27:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > fix the problem preventing the handshake between dhcp server and your
    > system.


    Oh, you think there was some glitch that caused the change.
    How does one home in on a possible cause, I wonder...
    >
    >> My ISP did give me a static external IP address, but the

    'inet'
    >> address is a local address, isn't it?

    >
    > Hmmm, how about, it is the address assigned to the nic.


    I'm confused by this. Here is what my ISP's email said when
    setting up ADSL:

    "Your static IP addess is: 78.xx.139.xx"

    Is that 'static' different from in your "make the connection
    static".
    >
    >> How does setting 'connection' as static affect inet address?

    >
    > nic always has the same address so it is static.


    How does my static IP address (78.xx.139.xx) relate to the
    inet address "192.168.0.xx" ?

    Is 'nic' the same as 'inet address'? If not, what is it?

    Are you saying that the 'inet address' is obtained from my ISP?
    If not, where does it come from?

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  9. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:31:27 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 15:27:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    >> fix the problem preventing the handshake between dhcp server and your
    >> system.

    >
    > Oh, you think there was some glitch that caused the change.


    No, all I did was give reasons. Not knowing what you did, did by
    others in the house, what happened to the router,.....

    > How does one home in on a possible cause, I wonder...


    Check logs on the dhcp server and your system.

    >>
    >>> My ISP did give me a static external IP address, but the

    > 'inet'
    >>> address is a local address, isn't it?

    >>
    >> Hmmm, how about, it is the address assigned to the nic.

    >
    > I'm confused by this.


    I can tell. I am giving you general terms for items.
    You keep taking general terms and have hard coded values in
    your head. Kinda like I give a pronoun (she) and you transpose it to a
    person (Wanda).


    > Here is what my ISP's email said when
    > setting up ADSL:
    >
    > "Your static IP addess is: 78.xx.139.xx"
    >
    > Is that 'static' different from in your "make the connection
    > static".


    Hmm, another bad question. Static is static and does not mean a
    particular address.

    You get to decide what ip address you wish to assign to a nic when you
    set it up as static.


    > Are you saying that the 'inet address' is obtained from my ISP?


    No, I am saying inet is the address of the nic regardless of how the
    nic was given the address.


    > If not, where does it come from?


    Depends, you, dhcp server, avahi-daemon, zeroconf code, another human,.....

    Here look at this, and tell me which inet of eth0 we are talking about.

    Internet
    |
    | eth0
    ,-------+----------.
    | ip ISP assigned |
    | ISP Gateway |
    | ip 71.171.124.1 |
    `-----+------------'
    | eth1
    |
    | eth0
    .------------------------------.
    | ip 71.171.124.137
    | gw 71.171.124.1 |
    | Actiontech RI408 |
    | router/modem |
    | ip 192.168.1.1 |
    `-------+-------------------+--'
    | |
    | eth0 | eth0
    .-------+--------. .-------+--------.
    | ip 192.168.1.4 | | ip 192.168.1.2 |
    | gw 192.168.1.1 | | gw 192.168.1.1 |
    | node1 | | node2 |
    | suse 10.3 | | kubuntu 8.4 |
    `----------------' | |
    | ip 192.168.5.6 |
    `------+---------'
    | eth1
    |
    | eth0
    .-------+--------.
    | ip 192.168.5.3 |
    | gw 192.168.5.6 |
    | node3 |
    | Mandriva 2008.1|
    `----------------'


  10. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:31:27 +0000 (UTC),
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 15:27:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    > >> My ISP did give me a static external IP address, but the

    > 'inet'
    > >> address is a local address, isn't it?

    > >
    > > Hmmm, how about, it is the address assigned to the nic.

    >
    > I'm confused by this. Here is what my ISP's email said when
    > setting up ADSL:
    >
    > "Your static IP addess is: 78.xx.139.xx"
    >
    > Is that 'static' different from in your "make the connection
    > static".
    > >
    > >> How does setting 'connection' as static affect inet address?

    > >
    > > nic always has the same address so it is static.

    >
    > How does my static IP address (78.xx.139.xx) relate to the
    > inet address "192.168.0.xx" ?
    >
    > Is 'nic' the same as 'inet address'? If not, what is it?
    >
    > Are you saying that the 'inet address' is obtained from my ISP?
    > If not, where does it come from?


    It's clear to me, from following this thread, that some clarification
    of a few terms and concepts might be helpful.

    The "inet address" that you see when running ifconfig is the IP address
    currently assigned to your network card (nic) on that machine. How it
    obtained that address can vary; if the card has been configured to get
    its address using DHCP, then it got it at boot/network restart time from
    your router or ADSL modem or whichever device physically connects you to
    the internet (a.k.a. the "next hop" out to the rest of the world - the
    device that is located at the other end of the wire from your nic).

    However, this is not the only way that the card can be set up; you can
    instead opt to assign a static address to it. This is done most easily
    in the Mandriva Control Center (MCC), but can also be done by manually
    editing the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file. Giving the
    nic a static address is generally a good idea, and doing so will make
    troubleshooting networking problems like the present one much easier.

    If you assign the nic a static IP address, it must fall within the
    range of addresses that your router/modem/whatever will accept. In your
    case, this appears to be 192.168.0.xx (where xx is > 1 and < 255). The
    gateway IP address also needs to be set at the same time; this is the
    "next hop" address, in your setup 192.168.0.1 (the address the router
    is listening on). The broadcast address in this case is 192.168.0.255.

    The router/modem/whatever will assign DHCP addresses from a subset of
    the available ones; you should choose an IP address for your nic that
    falls outside of this range. For example, if the router picks DHCP
    addresses from x.x.x.100 to x.x.x.150, any static address(es) you set
    should not be from within that span; ones like x.x.x.2 or x.x.x.200
    would be fine, and will avoid any possible conflicts should you connect
    a device that uses DHCP to the network at some future point.

    The static address that your router/modem/etc. uses for its external
    side (78.xx.139.xx, as noted above) is assigned to it by your ISP; it
    then translates the addresses on packets that pass through it in both
    directions, to make sure that all of them will get to their correct
    destination. This process is known as Network Address Translation, or
    NAT. In most cases, it's not something you'll need to concern yourself
    with very much.

    The router/etc. may well get its own static address from your ISP using
    DHCP; it is possible, when one has access to the DHCP server, to set it
    up to assign specific addresses to specific machines. This is, in fact,
    almost certainly how they do it in your case. The device itself also
    contains a DHCP server of its own, to hand out addresses on the local
    side of the connection (192.168.0.xx). How much access you have to the
    configuration of said server, and whether or not it is sufficiently
    flexible to allow you to set up static internal DHCP addresses, I have
    no idea. It's generally better all around to just ignore the onboard
    DHCP server in the router, and set up static addresses manually on each
    internal system, ones chosen from within the appropriate address range.

    Doing that simplifies things immensely, by allowing you to enter these
    addresses into the /etc/hosts file on each internal machine once and to
    not worry about whether or not they will change (which appears, AFAICT,
    to be at the root of the problems you've been having). With this sort
    of arrangement, the /etc/hosts files on multiple machines on the same
    network would all be identical, and therefore every machine will agree
    upon how to reach every other machine on the LAN.

    In a nutshell, while DHCP is nice for when a friend pops over and wants
    to plug in their laptop on your network, for systems that aren't going
    anywhere it really makes no sense to use it; use static IPs instead.

    HTH!

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  11. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 15:29:15 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:

    > some clarification
    > of a few terms and concepts might be helpful.


    Absolutely! Many thanks, Bill - much appreciated.

    With you and BT's guidance the mists have gradually cleared
    and I am going to experiment with a 'static' nic setup, using an
    installation of PCLinuxOS I happen to have on an external drive.

    'night, all...

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  12. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 21:47:37 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:

    > With you and BT's guidance the mists have gradually cleared
    > and I am going to experiment with a 'static' nic setup, using an
    > installation of PCLinuxOS I happen to have on an external drive.


    That's why I have 27 ip addresses for my two real machines.
    Each install gets it's own static ip address for eth0.

    That keeps ssh from complaining about possible man in the middle
    possibility when the info in ~/.ssh/known_hosts does not match the
    connection you are trying to create.

    Also had to do it in my virtual machines so they could network with
    each other.

  13. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 13:31:27 -0400, Maurice Batey wrote:

    > Oh, you think there was some glitch that caused the change.
    > How does one home in on a possible cause, I wonder...


    Currently, the desktop and notebook computers are getting the ip address from
    the router, using dhcp.

    If both computers are off when the dhcp leases expire, then the ip address
    given to each computer, will depend on the order they are turned on.

    > I'm confused by this. Here is what my ISP's email said when
    > setting up ADSL:
    > "Your static IP addess is: 78.xx.139.xx"
    > Is that 'static' different from in your "make the connection
    > static".


    Yes, they are different.

    The router gets the ip address that the isp will use to send data to it, from
    the isp via dhcp, or, as in your case, it is statically assigned. That ip
    address is used to get traffic from the net, to your router. It is not normally
    used on the lan side of the router.

    > How does my static IP address (78.xx.139.xx) relate to the
    > inet address "192.168.0.xx" ?


    The router has two ip addresses. The 78.xx.139.xx is used by your isp, to route
    traffic from the net, to your router. The 192.168.0.1 (typically) is used by
    computers on your lan, to send packets directly to the router. Note that sending
    a packet directly to the router, is not the same as sending a packet through the
    router, to your isp.

    > Is 'nic' the same as 'inet address'? If not, what is it?


    Network Interface Card. This can be a card you plug into a pci/usb/isa/pcmia slot,
    or built into the motherboard. Each computer may have multiple nics.

    In your case, the laptop has one nic (that you're using, the wireless adapter,
    and the desktop has one nic, the ethernet card or chipset. Each nic has a MAC
    address (also called hardware address), that is supposed to be unique, and
    identifies that particular network interface.

    > Are you saying that the 'inet address' is obtained from my ISP?
    > If not, where does it come from?


    The address of the router, was given to you by your isp, via email. In the
    router configuration, you've set that ip address, which is only used on the
    internet side of the router.

    Take a look at your router's configuration screen. Most routers will require you
    to use a web browser, on a computer connected to if directly via an ethernet cable.
    In the browser, you go to http://192.168.0.1 (address will vary, depending on the
    make and/or model of the router).

    In the router configuration, you have a choice. Use dhcp to assign the addresses
    to the computers, that you connect to it, or statically assign the addresses by
    entering the MAC addresses of the NICs, in a table, specifying which ip address
    should be associated with which MAC. You can use a mixture, where some computers
    have an ip address and MAC in the routers static table, and the rest get dhcp
    assigned addresses.

    The computers setup for it's NIC has to match with what you've setup, in the
    router. Either dhcp, or static.

    At present, both your notebook, and the desktop have dhcp assigned addresses.

    I would change both to static, although in this case, just changing the desktop
    would probably accomplish what you want.

    To change the notebook and desktop to static, do the following ...

    Run ifconfig on both computers, and take note of the HWaddr (that's the MAC),
    of each.

    In the router configuration, find the table of MAC/IP addresses, for static
    assignment. Pick an ip 192.168.?.? for each, enter the mac addresses, and save the
    configuration.

    In each of the computers, use mcc to remove the existing network connection,
    and readd it, using static, and the ip 192.168.?.? matching the setting in
    the router. Ensure the hosts file on both, match with the router settings.

    Hope this helps to clarify things.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  14. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 15:27:35 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > fix the problem preventing the handshake between dhcp server and your
    > system.


    Mystery solved. The reason the inet address had changed from
    its usual 192.168.0.2 was because - on those days - I had booted
    the *laptop* first, which was therefore allocated the first free
    address above the router's 192.168.0.1, i.e. 192.168.0.2 as IP
    address, so that when the desktop was booted the next IP in
    sequence (192.168.0.3) was allocated!

    So all I have to do to prevent any more such fluctuation is to
    ensure the desktop is first to boot.

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  15. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 21:47:37 +0000, I wrote:

    > I am going to experiment with a 'static' nic setup, using an
    > installation of PCLinuxOS I happen to have on an external drive.


    Looked into that, and found that another set of similar fields
    would have to be changed in the router (Netgear DG834G), and as
    I'm not 100% sure of the changes I have shelved the idea for
    the time being, not wanting to change a setup that has
    performed flawlessly for over a year - yet.

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  16. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:11:30 +0000 (UTC), Maurice Batey wrote:

    > Looked into that, and found that another set of similar fields
    > would have to be changed in the router (Netgear DG834G), and as
    > I'm not 100% sure of the changes I have shelved the idea for
    > the time being, not wanting to change a setup that has
    > performed flawlessly for over a year - yet.


    I have no experience with Netgear DG834G but I would assume
    you should NOT have to change anything in the router.


  17. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 18:54:46 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > At present, both your notebook, and the desktop have dhcp assigned
    > addresses.
    >
    > I would change both to static, although in this case, just changing the
    > desktop would probably accomplish what you want.


    I had assumed that as a laptop is sometimes away from base,
    it should not have a static IP address in case it clashes
    with another server's static IP address.

    > In the router configuration, find the table of MAC/IP
    > addresses, for static assignment.


    I can find the MAC's for the desktop and laptop, and under
    - "LAN IP Setup" - an empty table headed "Address Reservation"
    with column headers:

    IP address Device name MAC address

    which is presumably what you refer to.

    > Hope this helps to clarify things.


    Absolutely - many thanks! I shall save this posting as part
    of my 'IP' notes for use when I can face the changes (which may
    now be sooner than I thought).

    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)

  18. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 16:33:23 +0000 (UTC),
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 18:54:46 -0400, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >
    > > At present, both your notebook, and the desktop have dhcp assigned
    > > addresses.
    > >
    > > I would change both to static, although in this case, just changing
    > > the desktop would probably accomplish what you want.

    >
    > I had assumed that as a laptop is sometimes away from base,
    > it should not have a static IP address in case it clashes
    > with another server's static IP address.


    Which is why having the router always assign the same addresses via DHCP
    is always preferable, in those cases when it's possible - it allows you
    to leave any or all systems set to use DHCP if you wish, yet completely
    solves the problem of shifting IP addresses.

    > > In the router configuration, find the table of MAC/IP
    > > addresses, for static assignment.

    >
    > I can find the MAC's for the desktop and laptop, and under
    > - "LAN IP Setup" - an empty table headed "Address Reservation"
    > with column headers:
    >
    > IP address Device name MAC address
    >
    > which is presumably what you refer to.


    Bingo. That's exactly what you want to see. Enter the hostnames, MAC
    addresses, and chosen static IP addresses for your systems there, and
    you'll never have to worry about this sort of problem again, no matter
    in what order you power up your systems.

    If it were me, I'd still configure the desktop to use a manual static IP
    address and to not use DHCP, while setting up both systems in the router
    to be able to get their correct address via DHCP on that screen. This
    way. even if the router settings are lost for some reason (prolonged
    power outage, whatever), at least you can be sure that the desktop will
    *always* boot up with the right IP address, regardless.

    --
    Bill Mullen
    RLU #270075



  19. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:24:59 -0400, Bill Mullen wrote:

    > Enter the hostnames, MAC
    > addresses, and chosen static IP addresses for your systems there


    What 'hostname' is that?

    (When I asked the router to show me the 'Add' template, it
    automatically showed the MAC and IP address of the desktop, but
    for 'Device name' it shows 'Unknown'. What should go there?)

    Do you mean if I set the router up with that table that there is
    no functional need to change the DHCP setup in MCC?
    --
    /\/\aurice
    Linux Mandriva 2.6.22.19-desktop-2mdv 2008.0 PP 32-bit
    KDE 3.5.7 Virtualbox 1.5.6
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  20. Re: connect to host 192.168.0.7 port 22: Connection refused

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 13:35:05 -0400, Maurice Batey wrote:

    > (When I asked the router to show me the 'Add' template, it
    > automatically showed the MAC and IP address of the desktop, but
    > for 'Device name' it shows 'Unknown'. What should go there?)


    Whatever you want. The name in the router setup, is only to help you remember
    which machine is which. It isn't used in any traffic routing. You could
    enter "Desktop", or "Main", or even leave it blank.

    > Do you mean if I set the router up with that table that there is
    > no functional need to change the DHCP setup in MCC?


    Here, I'm not quite sure. I would expect the ip address would have to be outside
    of the range that the router has reserved for dhcp addresses. MCC would then
    have to have the address changed to a static address.

    If the router will allow you to specify an address inside the range used for dhcp,
    I'm not sure if the computer will still be able to use dhcp, or if it will have
    to be configured, as static. Shouldn't hurt to go ahead and try it. If it doesn't
    work with dhcp, just change it to static.

    Another thing you may want to look at. If you decide to stay with dhcp, you could
    increase the dhcp lease expires timeout. It's probably set at around 24 hours right
    now. You could increase this to a week, or more, then you'd only have to worry about
    the order the computers are turned on, that often.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
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    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

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