Hans leads police to Nina's body - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Hans leads police to Nina's body - Mandriva ; On Sat, 12 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article , Adam wrote: >> I've seen some horror stories in other newsgroups. It _shouldn't_ >> be that big of a deal. > >I'm not even sure whom I ...

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Thread: Hans leads police to Nina's body

  1. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Sat, 12 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >> I've seen some horror stories in other newsgroups. It _shouldn't_
    >> be that big of a deal.

    >
    >I'm not even sure whom I should switch to. Somehow almost everybody
    >claims that their own ISP is the absolute worst.


    Nah, that can't be - _my_ ISP... ;-) A lot of it is personal
    opinion, just as which is the best/worst distribution/beer/icecream/
    what-ever.

    >> I've also heard stories that the original anonymous complaints to
    >> the A/G may have been from one or more of the ISPs as a way to get
    >> out of a service that was not well used.

    >
    >That's possible... but what would that have gotten them? I don't think
    >the ISPs came off any better because of that "reason".


    The reasons I've seen proposed are pretty weak - bandwidth (should be a
    drop in the bucket compared to file-sharing/bit-torrent/what-ever) or
    costs of the hardware (a couple of servers with terabyte disks?) or
    costs of support (but the Internet is b0rken). It's probably an easy
    service to drop, because not that many customers are even aware of it
    and therefore the waves generated won't be that large. The waves would
    be even less because the ISPs can point at Cuomo and say "that's the
    bad guy who forced us to drop this service - blame him!!!".

    >>> alt.binaries.multimedia.watchingpaintdry,

    >>
    >> Hmmm - that one isn't on giganews

    >
    >Probably bandwidth. Some of the videos there are several days long,
    >especially the ones of enamel house paint.


    You'd think that with data compression, this wouldn't be a problem. (In
    the mid-1970s, I worked at a flight test facility, and we had television
    cameras mounted on the tracking radars. The video was sent to a control
    site fifty miles away over ordinary 2400 BPS modems - the data converter
    only sent "changed" pixels, and the receiving end reconstituted the
    picture back to standard NTSB.)

    >> Looking at the list of groups I'm following and the rough bandwidth
    >> figures, I've got 27 alt.* groups (no alt.b*), and 34 comp.* groups,
    >> and the alt.* needs twice the bandwidth.

    >
    >Well, I'm basically using as much bandwidth for newsgroups as before,
    >only now almost all of it requires VZ to get it thru the 'net from other
    >newsservers.


    These are all text groups - and it seems that the alt.* groups are just
    more wordy (and more active) than the comp.* groups.

    >[DTV converter]


    >> I haven't gotten the coupons yet, and my local Wal-Mart is a mess

    >
    >My letter listed RadioShack, Best Buy, Circuit City, and Wal-Mart
    >stores, all within a half hour's drive from my home. The coupons are
    >only good for 90 days after being issued. Most converters block any
    >analog signals; look for one with "analog pass-through" (I think that's
    >what it's called) if that's important to you.


    Thanks for the heads-up. There are six TVs in the house, and in the
    1970s to early 1990s, we used to watch a fair amount of TV. Today,
    they're more likely to be used to view tapes/DVDs than anything else.

    [extra computer - uses]

    >Yep, I think it would be overkill for me. I'm not running any kind of
    >server, and my main system handles print spooling well enough.


    Did you ever get that LazyJet working over the network?

    >And I don't want to buy any more drives for the old box when I'd be
    >better off buying drives for the new one.


    Drives are _comparatively_ cheap, and the idea might be to use the
    drives on the ancient system as a backup and/or long term storage.
    "man rsync" What you are doing is avoiding a "single point of
    failure" - such as the power supply or drive controller.

    >> Valley fever is, as it's not uncommon here and can be fatal. But
    >> I've got enough other things wrong that it's the least of the
    >> problems. They yanked a benign tumor out of me earlier, and there
    >> is something else screwing with my blood work that they haven't
    >> found yet. Apparently> not critical/fatal, but they're looking.

    >
    >Oh dear! It always seems to be something, doesn't it? When things
    >go too smoothly, I'm now suspicious.


    Going smoothly? When I've got six '*ologists' of various kinds that
    I'm seeing on some form of schedule? At the moment, they're doing
    blood work quarterly, and four of the specialists (and the Primary
    Care guy) are all following things closely. The only one who isn't
    doing so is the derma... make that seven '*ologists'. (Skin
    cancer is moderately common here in "The Valley of the Sun", but if
    caught early is trivial to fix - a quick burst of liquid nitrogen from
    a "freeze-bomb" burns the individual problem away. Filling out the
    normal paperwork takes far longer than the time actually spent with
    the dermatologist.)

    See your medical provider[s] on a regular basis. My commercial pilots
    license requires an annual physical from an approved doctor, and this
    guy ran tests beyond the 14CFR67 requirements. He never actually
    found anything - but he found warning signs and directed me to see my
    Primary Care, who referred me to... who then did... and referred me
    to... you get the idea.

    Old guy

  2. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Sat, 12 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >>> BTW, does anyone here know what would happen if a crime
    >>> were committed in a place like that?

    >>
    >> Depends - you would _probably_ be subjected to tribal law

    >
    >But what would happen if a crime were committed, say, halfway across
    >the Atlantic on a ship or plane? Who's in charge there?


    Why, the captain of the ship, or the pilot of the plane of course. If
    [s]he needs assistance, he may call on any man-of-war for such. Beyond
    that, the laws of the country of registration of the vessel/plane or
    the country of ownership of the vessel/plane, or the country of the
    company operating the vessel/plane, any international laws, regulations,
    or customary rules (for air, that would be ICAO), and if all else fails,
    the laws of the country of departure/arrival.

    [price of fuel/ciggies]

    >> I think it's already been mentioned that most governments see tobacco


    motor fuels,

    >> and booze are an unlimited source of tax revenue, and it's "what the
    >> sheep will pay" for limits.


    >I just bought gasoline today (July 12 2008, Hyde Park, NY, USA,
    >$4.279/gallon


    Arizona is cheap - $4.139 at the station on the corner - $4.179 at the
    convenience store and the car wash around the same intersection.

    >and the signs there for cigarettes ranged from $4.77 for obscure brands
    >up to $5.70 for Marlboros (packs of 20). I think the state cigarette
    >tax is again the highest in the country.


    $5.59 for GPC, $6.14 for "national" brands, which should include Marlboro.
    Your state cigarette tax (a quick google search says NY is 37% of the
    wholesale price) may be first, but the state taxes aren't the only ones.
    Cities and counties also pile it on... SWEET MOTHER OF... New York City
    gets $2.00 a pack.

    >I agree with you about tobacco and liquor taxes being practically
    >unlimited.


    The latest tax added here, I seem to think it was 5 or 10 cents more PER
    cigarette - $1 or $2 a pack (can't remember which, and seeing as how I
    quit ten years ago, no longer worry about it) was added to pay for
    some additional health costs, as well as an increased advertising
    budget for anti-smoking ads. People do tend to forget that the
    higher taxes effect all users of the products, because of the extra
    work/costs to the manufacturer and distributor for security and law
    enforcement. The fines for selling ciggies/booze to underaged do not
    pay for the cost of law enforcement, courts, and any incarceration.
    Those costs come from the general public even if they don't use the
    product in question.

    Old guy

  3. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Sun, 13 Jul 2008 07:54:44 +0200, Aragorn wrote:



    Sorry, your verbosity prevents me from bothering to reply. I don't know
    if the reading of it just wore me down, or simply removed my motivation to
    bother any more. Either way, it's just too much work.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  4. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Monday 14 July 2008 03:55, someone who identifies as *Dan C* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    >
    >
    > Sorry, your verbosity prevents me from bothering to reply. I don't know
    > if the reading of it just wore me down, or simply removed my motivation to
    > bother any more. Either way, it's just too much work.


    Doesn't matter. I simply stated my opinion and you decided to criticize me
    on it under the assumption that I had no valid grounds to such an opinion.
    I have then stated my reasons, and so for me the case is closed.

    Besides, neither of us is going to bring Nina Reiser back to life or change
    what happens to Hans Reiser himself from here on.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  5. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Monday 14 July 2008 03:47, someone who identifies as *Moe Trin* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > A nephew was an interstate truck driver (he was national, and now is
    > mainly in Southern California), and reports that the checks are quite
    > random - but frequent. As you pull up to the scales, a state police
    > individual may knock on the driver's door for a quicky log book check.
    > As the book is supposed to be immediately available to the driver, the
    > check should only take a few seconds - unless the log doesn't look
    > right, or is incomplete, or missing. No one may "expect the Spanish
    > Inquisition", but the drivers sure expect to have their logs inspected
    > (along with the vehicle).


    They're starting to work on more frequent checks here now. I guess the main
    reason as to why they hadn't yet was the lack of staff, because trucks have
    been overloaded for many years now, and the amount of trucks on the roads
    has also dramatically increased.

    As a result, our highways are getting severely damaged by all the
    (literally) heavy traffic, with trackforming in the asphalt. This is less
    of a problem in Germany, where the quality and thickness of the asphalt
    layers is much better than here.

    You will now see heavy trucks around the clock here in Belgium, albeit that
    there still are less of them between midnight and about 4h00 AM. And then
    that's when the frenzy starts.

    >> I've even seen a picture once - albeit that I don't remember whether
    >> this was in Belgium; it was surely in Europe, judging by the type and
    >> brand of car - where such a car was actually hidden underneath a bunch
    >> of branches and leaves, with only the windshield and the camera flash
    >> exposed.

    >
    > Speed traps? Can be as simple as a car (often with radar or ladar)
    > parked on the side of the road, or may be as nasty as a light plane
    > circling 300-1200 meters above the road, with marks on the road a
    > known distance apart.


    The parked unmarked cars are quite common. Other than that, there are fixed
    camera housings at most of the traffic lights and often at other points
    next to the road. Not all of those contain a camera, as those cameras are
    quite expensive and are thus rotated between locations, but even if there
    isn't a camera in them, the flash still works, which has a preventive
    effect. After all, you never know in advance whether you've actually had
    your picture taken while breaking the law.

    > There will be a crew of pursuit cars about 350 to 500 meters down the
    > road, and maybe a "stopper" 2 KM further.


    In some cases that applies here as well, but not in general.

    > At one time in the 1960s, Connecticut used to have this form of trap,
    > and the crew of pursuit cars were at a roadside rest area, along with
    > a bus fitted out as a courtroom with presiding judge - for the
    > speeder's convenience, of course.


    Cool, a judgemobile... Court on wheels.

    > I think that's now gone away, as the last three times I went past that
    > haunt, there was just the normal radar car and three pursuit cars.


    One of the most spectacular speed violations here was back in the
    mid-eighties. A guy driving a BMW was signalled to be speeding from the
    direction of The Netherlands towards France, doing 225 km/h on the highway.

    The Antwerp "Rijkswacht" corps went in pursuit in their (now decommissioned)
    Porsche 911, which had a 2.7 liter boxer engine. They couldn't catch up
    with the guy, and somewhere in the vicinity of Ghent, they blew up their
    engine - Porsche 911s have an aircooled 6-cylinder boxer. So they notified
    the Ghent patrol, and they went in pursuit with their Saab 900 Turbo, but
    they were unable to catch up with the guy before he crossed the French
    border. ;-)

    Meanwhile such a situation would of course no longer be possible through the
    Schengen Treaty, which allows close cooperation between the law enforcement
    agencies of the countries that signed the treaty, so that their police
    officers may continue pursuit across the border if necessary. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  6. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    <9nzek.156400$ft1.52292@newsfe14.ams2>, Aragorn wrote:

    >*Moe Trin* wrote


    >> The vehicle registration fee may include a tax based on the suggested
    >> retail price and the age of the car


    >The age of the car is also kept into account with regard to registration
    >taxing and insurance premiums over here. The former goes down and the
    >latter go up with the age of the car.


    Now that seems unusual. Both taxing and insurance go down here because
    the vehicle is worth less. The only time the _insurance_ goes up
    (assuming no other changes) is when the car is old enough to be a
    classic or collector's item. The insurance on my neighbor's 1948
    Chevrolet is more per year than he paid for the car when he bought it
    new, but that's because it is quite rare now.

    >Something I've also noticed that is different here from the US or even
    >the UK and possibly other European countries is that when you guys sell
    >your car on to someone else, the registration plate stays with the car.
    >In Belgium, the registration plate stays with the owner.


    Again - that depends on the state. Arizona and Connecticut both stay
    with the owner - California stays with the car (unless they are special
    "vanity" plates).

    >Another thing that's also mandatory here is that every new car
    >registered for personal use must have an annual checkup at a legally
    >established validation center for defects as of the time it is four
    >years old. Trucks, company vehicles and secondhand cars are required
    >to be checked every year, regardless of their age.


    Again - that depends on the state. I believe all states have emissions
    testing, but a number also have testing for defects.

    >Aside from what I've already mentioned before, some insurance companies
    >rate red cars to be more of a security hazard - supposedly because the
    >buyers of red cars would be more aggressive drivers; which is
    >nonsensical, of course.


    I dunno - I seem to remember seeing a long thread in another Usenet
    newsgroup where the loss tables were discussed. The actuarial tables
    shown backed up claims about different car colors being more or less
    risky for the insurer. I don't know how many insurers use this criteria
    as the risk ratings are not obvious on the insurance bills/statements.

    Old guy

  7. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    <9%yek.136333$AH5.45089@newsfe09.ams2>, Aragorn wrote:

    >*Moe Trin* wrote


    >As a result, our highways are getting severely damaged by all the
    >(literally) heavy traffic, with trackforming in the asphalt. This is
    >less of a problem in Germany, where the quality and thickness of the
    >asphalt layers is much better than here.


    If you consult a civil engineering textbook, you'll find that the
    asphalt (macadam, blacktop, road-oil, what-ever) is not meant to be a
    structural layer, but is meant to weatherproof the layers underneath
    which is actually where the strength lies, and to provide a wearing
    surface. "California Bearing Ratio" is one term referring to testing
    the underlay or foundation of the road itself.

    >The parked unmarked cars are quite common. Other than that, there are
    >fixed camera housings at most of the traffic lights and often at other
    >points next to the road. Not all of those contain a camera, as those
    >cameras are quite expensive and are thus rotated between locations,
    >but even if there isn't a camera in them, the flash still works, which
    >has a preventive effect.


    Cameras here tend to be owned by a separate company, and operated for
    the city/county/state governments. In many cases, the company gets a
    percentage of the "take" which angers many drivers/voters. But then, a
    lot of people feel that ALL traffic enforcement is merely a revenue
    source.

    >> There will be a crew of pursuit cars about 350 to 500 meters down
    >> the road, and maybe a "stopper" 2 KM further.

    >
    >In some cases that applies here as well, but not in general.


    The idea is that the radar/ladar is to busy spotting speeders to have
    them pursue anyone. The operator merely radios "the red Mercedes - 82
    MPH" and "witnesses" that the pursuit cars go after the right vehicle.
    If the speeder doesn't stop, then we have a second offense, much more
    serious, and the pursuit cars go after them - with the stopper ready
    to block the road if needed.

    >One of the most spectacular speed violations here was back in the
    >mid-eighties. A guy driving a BMW was signalled to be speeding from
    >the direction of The Netherlands towards France, doing 225 km/h on the
    >highway.


    You may be fast, but you aren't faster than radio. "299792458 meters
    per second isn't just a good idea, it's a law!"

    >The Antwerp "Rijkswacht" corps went in pursuit in their (now
    >decommissioned) Porsche 911, which had a 2.7 liter boxer engine. They
    >couldn't catch up with the guy, and somewhere in the vicinity of
    >Ghent, they blew up their engine


    The radios used in US Army tanks in 1940 were ruggedized versions of
    radios used in (state) police cars. In some cases, they were actually
    the same make/model radio as used by the police. Is this klown
    out-running you? No problem - radio ahead, and follow at a safe (but
    high) speed with your lights on. In larger metropolitan areas, one of
    the "police vehicles" that may join the chase is a helicopter - are you
    faster than 325 KM/H? Actually it's not unusual to also have civilian
    news aircraft get involved as well. About 6-9 months ago we had a
    mid-air collision between two news helicopters that were televising a
    police chase. (There was a single police 'copter, 3 news copters, and
    two news planes all following some idiot. Such pursuits happen with
    some regularity, which can make like more difficult for the prosecutor
    trying to find jurors who didn't see the television coverage. Witnesses?
    How many do you need - we've even got it on film (tape).

    >Meanwhile such a situation would of course no longer be possible
    >through the Schengen Treaty, which allows close cooperation between
    >the law enforcement agencies of the countries that signed the treaty,
    >so that their police officers may continue pursuit across the border
    >if necessary. ;-)


    We only have such borders with Canada and Mexico, and they are not all
    that open (there are often customs/immigration posts at the borders).
    But at the state level there is no artificial blocks, and anyone may
    freely drive into the next state. "Hot Pursuit" rules have existed for
    longer than motor vehicles. A law enforcement officer in pursuit of an
    offender may cross city/county/state borders while trying to apprehend
    a violator. If they can stop the violator, they hold them until a local
    cop arrives, who then arrests the violator for "fleeing justice" and
    effectively turns them over to the pursuing officer. But again, radio
    is faster than any car, and the police of the next jurisdiction may be
    waiting for the offender.

    Old guy

  8. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Monday 14 July 2008 22:08, someone who identifies as *Moe Trin* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > On Mon, 14 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in
    > article <9%yek.136333$AH5.45089@newsfe09.ams2>, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >
    >>As a result, our highways are getting severely damaged by all the
    >>(literally) heavy traffic, with trackforming in the asphalt. This is
    >>less of a problem in Germany, where the quality and thickness of the
    >>asphalt layers is much better than here.

    >
    > If you consult a civil engineering textbook, you'll find that the
    > asphalt (macadam, blacktop, road-oil, what-ever) is not meant to be a
    > structural layer, but is meant to weatherproof the layers underneath
    > which is actually where the strength lies, and to provide a wearing
    > surface. "California Bearing Ratio" is one term referring to testing
    > the underlay or foundation of the road itself.


    Well, okay... I'm not an engineer. :-) Either way, our roads are not as
    strong as the German roads, and our politicians know about it, but the
    whole world of government-issued contracts is - again - a world of its own,
    where sanity has to step aside for "good friends" and "lowest bidders".

    >>> There will be a crew of pursuit cars about 350 to 500 meters down
    >>> the road, and maybe a "stopper" 2 KM further.

    >>
    >>In some cases that applies here as well, but not in general.

    >
    > The idea is that the radar/ladar is to busy spotting speeders to have
    > them pursue anyone. The operator merely radios "the red Mercedes - 82
    > MPH" and "witnesses" that the pursuit cars go after the right vehicle.
    > If the speeder doesn't stop, then we have a second offense, much more
    > serious, and the pursuit cars go after them - with the stopper ready
    > to block the road if needed.


    If they have the manpower, then this kind of operation will be set up.
    However, they are usually too tied up in other affairs to do it that way.

    >> One of the most spectacular speed violations here was back in the
    >> mid-eighties. A guy driving a BMW was signalled to be speeding from
    >> the direction of The Netherlands towards France, doing 225 km/h on the
    >> highway.

    >
    > You may be fast, but you aren't faster than radio. "299792458 meters
    > per second isn't just a good idea, it's a law!"


    Sure, but it's the time expired between the reception of the message and the
    getting to a viable interception point that matters. :-) And you can't
    just simply go and block the entire width of an important highway like that
    either. :-)

    > [...] About 6-9 months ago we had a mid-air collision between two news
    > helicopters that were televising a police chase. (There was a single
    > police 'copter, 3 news copters, and two news planes all following some
    > idiot.


    Our news services rarely use a helicopter, if at all. I guess they don't
    have the funds for that.

    > Such pursuits happen with some regularity, which can make like more
    > difficult for the prosecutor trying to find jurors who didn't see the
    > television coverage. Witnesses? How many do you need - we've even got it
    > on film (tape).


    I can see the difficulty in finding neutral jurors in a case like that, yes.
    As for the witnesses, at least then the anecdote of "twenty people standing
    around and none of them having seen a damn thing" won't count anymore. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  9. Re: Uses for old systems (Was: Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body)

    bobbie sellers wrote:
    > Might want to try SliTaz 1.0 which is quite small
    > at 25 Megabytes in ISO.
    >
    > http://www.slitaz.org.


    Thanks, bobbie! I downloaded the .iso, and I'll see if I can get it to
    run on the old system. That system's so old that it won't boot from a
    CD, just from a floppy or the HD. DamnSmallLinux had a way to boot from
    a floppy, but that didn't work the first time I tried it.

    Adam

  10. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > (In
    > the mid-1970s, I worked at a flight test facility, and we had television
    > cameras mounted on the tracking radars. The video was sent to a control
    > site fifty miles away over ordinary 2400 BPS modems - the data converter
    > only sent "changed" pixels, and the receiving end reconstituted the
    > picture back to standard NTSB.)


    NTSB or NTSC? ;-)

    > These are all text groups - and it seems that the alt.* groups are just
    > more wordy (and more active) than the comp.* groups.


    I'd agree. Does anybody have a chart listing the most active newsgroups
    in each hierarchy?

    >> Most [DTV] converters block any
    >> analog signals; look for one with "analog pass-through" (I think that's
    >> what it's called) if that's important to you.

    >
    > Thanks for the heads-up.


    The RadioShack ad in this past Sunday's paper advertised a model of DTV
    converter (
    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=3150939 ) where
    the copy explicitly stated that it had analog pass-through, so you could
    continue to watch low-power analog stations. $60 + tax - $40 coupon.

    > Did you ever get that LazyJet working over the network?


    Good memory! Yep, bought a straight-through (not crossover) cable and
    connected the printer to my DSL modem/router. I had to use ftp to set
    up the printer, my router's config screen to set up the router, and MCC
    to set up Mandriva, but I got it working. It takes a while to warm up,
    draws 30W in "power saver" mode (and 1W when switched off!), is decently
    fast in "draft grayscale" but slow in color, but the price was right.
    Even with an occasional replacement part (from normal usage), I still
    think it costs less per page than my inkjet.

    Two minor problems, though. One, "normal grayscale" and "high quality"
    come out squished to half-height, so I just use "draft grayscale" and
    "normal," and use the inkjet when higher quality is needed, which isn't
    often. Also, occasionally the printer "moves" -- I set it up as
    192.168.1.47, but one day it had become 192.168.1.45. If that happens
    enough to be a problem, I'll look into it. It took me a while to
    realize that I actually had a LAN, albeit a small one: computer,
    printer, router.

    When I bought this box in December, it came with a "free" printer, HP
    DeskJet D1430, but I haven't even opened that box yet.

    > Drives are _comparatively_ cheap, and the idea might be to use the
    > drives on the ancient system as a backup and/or long term storage.
    > "man rsync" What you are doing is avoiding a "single point of
    > failure" - such as the power supply or drive controller.


    My current backup system involves burning a DVD-RW with selected
    directories (/home, /etc, /usr/local, /boot, /root) every Sunday. When
    the prices drop some more (like down to $100), I'm planning to get a 1
    TB external USB HD (if I can find one that is both reliable and quiet),
    and back up the entire internal HD every night. I think even my current
    method is good enough to survive anything except a direct lightning
    strike, fire, flood, earthquake, or theft. I'm planning to implement an
    off-site backup strategy by occasionally putting copies of my backup DVD
    in my car and my parents' house. Do you (or anybody!) have any
    suggestions for a better way to manage backups on a low budget, bearing
    in mind that I'm not doing anything critical?

    > Going smoothly? When I've got six '*ologists' of various kinds that
    > I'm seeing on some form of schedule?


    And of course anything that one suggests has to be cleared with all of
    the others. I have, I think, four specialists that I see on some
    regular basis. I was in a minor car accident and couldn't drive my car
    any more than a bare minimum until this week, so I'd been postponing the
    ophthalmologist and optician, which is 100 miles right there (two round
    trips, 25 miles each way, to the one optician in the county that takes
    my insurance).

    > See your medical provider[s] on a regular basis.


    Excellent idea... if I'd done that all along, things probably wouldn't
    have gotten to where they are now.

    Adam

  11. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > Your state cigarette tax (a quick google search says NY is 37% of the
    > wholesale price) may be first, but the state taxes aren't the only ones.
    > Cities and counties also pile it on... SWEET MOTHER OF... New York City
    > gets $2.00 a pack.


    Years ago I had to buy a pack in NYC and was astounded by the price. It
    would be easy enough to leave NYC (to Westchester or Nassau County or
    New Jersey or even Connecticut) on a "cigarette run".

    > The fines for selling ciggies/booze to underaged do not
    > pay for the cost of law enforcement, courts, and any incarceration.
    > Those costs come from the general public even if they don't use the
    > product in question.


    True, but then there are many things I pay for that don't affect me.
    Much of the time, "my" legislators are doing things for other
    states/counties/municipalities that I don't live in. I'm paying for
    interstate, state, county, and town roads that I'll never drive on. I'm
    paying for prisons although I haven't committed any crimes. I can't
    think of any improvement to this system, though.

    Adam

  12. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Wed, 16 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    Moe Trin wrote:

    >> the receiving end reconstituted the picture back to standard NTSB.)

    >
    >NTSB or NTSC? ;-)


    National Transportation and Safety Board. or Never The Same Color?

    >I'd agree. Does anybody have a chart listing the most active newsgroups
    >in each hierarchy?


    Which hierarchies?

    [compton ~]$ cut -d'.' -f1 .newsrc | sort -u | wc -l
    4280
    [compton ~]$

    Or do you mean just the 'big eight' plus 'alt.'?

    >> Did you ever get that LazyJet working over the network?

    >
    >Good memory! Yep, bought a straight-through (not crossover) cable and
    >connected the printer to my DSL modem/router. I had to use ftp to set
    >up the printer, my router's config screen to set up the router, and MCC
    >to set up Mandriva, but I got it working.


    My turn - "ftp" or "telnet"?

    >Even with an occasional replacement part (from normal usage), I still
    >think it costs less per page than my inkjet.


    Well, they are built pretty solid, and shouldn't need much for parts.

    >Two minor problems, though. One, "normal grayscale" and "high quality"
    >come out squished to half-height, so I just use "draft grayscale" and
    >"normal," and use the inkjet when higher quality is needed, which isn't
    >often.


    comp.laser-printers
    comp.periphs.printer
    comp.periphs.printers

    The last one is the official group - the others _might_ be helpful. That
    problem vaguely rings a bell... memory or memory setup?

    >Also, occasionally the printer "moves" -- I set it up as 192.168.1.47
    >but one day it had become 192.168.1.45. If that happens enough to be
    >a problem, I'll look into it.


    That shouldn't happen. Does this turkey have a battery for CMOS RAM?

    >It took me a while to realize that I actually had a LAN, albeit a small
    >one: computer, printer, router.


    Well, it's in your house, so it's a Local Area, and it is Ethernet, so
    that does make it a Network. ;-)

    >My current backup system involves burning a DVD-RW with selected
    >directories (/home, /etc, /usr/local, /boot, /root) every Sunday.


    OK

    >When the prices drop some more (like down to $100), I'm planning to
    >get a 1 TB external USB HD (if I can find one that is both reliable
    >and quiet), and back up the entire internal HD every night. I think
    >even my current method is good enough to survive anything except a
    >direct lightning strike, fire, flood, earthquake, or theft.


    The only reason I was suggesting a separate computer is speed. You
    could boot the sucker Sunday evening, mirror your existing stuff over
    the LAN, and shut her down when done. It's one less common failure
    point. Physical space might be an issue, but that's about it.

    >I'm planning to implement an off-site backup strategy by occasionally
    >putting copies of my backup DVD in my car and my parents' house. Do
    >you (or anybody!) have any suggestions for a better way to manage
    >backups on a low budget, bearing in mind that I'm not doing anything
    >critical?


    Parent's house is good - I would NOT use the car for several reasons.
    In my case, daytime temps in the car are excessive in summer, and the
    garage is attached to the house. I'm backing "critical" stuff to a
    CD which goes into the safe, a monthly copy goes to the box in the
    bank, and nightly I'm mirroring to my sister's server in Connecticut.
    I provide the same backup service to her. With 'rsync' it's not a big
    bandwidth deal.

    >> Going smoothly? When I've got six '*ologists' of various kinds that
    >> I'm seeing on some form of schedule?


    >And of course anything that one suggests has to be cleared with all of
    >the others. I have, I think, four specialists that I see on some
    >regular basis. I was in a minor car accident and couldn't drive my car
    >any more than a bare minimum until this week, so I'd been postponing the
    >ophthalmologist and optician, which is 100 miles right there (two round
    >trips, 25 miles each way, to the one optician in the county that takes
    >my insurance).


    Oh, you betcha! And $DEITY help you if you need surgery, as you have to
    get releases from all, in addition to the primary care guy and the
    insurance carrier. When I see any one, I also require copies of any
    lab results, so I can share the information with everyone else.

    >> See your medical provider[s] on a regular basis.

    >
    >Excellent idea... if I'd done that all along, things probably wouldn't
    >have gotten to where they are now.


    My remaining sister has had most of the problems I'm having, and even
    takes nearly identical medications - and she's passing the words along
    to her kids as well as the kids and grandkids of my other (late) sister.
    "How about that - you've got $PROBLEM now as well".

    Old guy

  13. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Wed, 16 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >> Cities and counties also pile it on... SWEET MOTHER OF... New York
    >> City gets $2.00 a pack.

    >
    >Years ago I had to buy a pack in NYC and was astounded by the price.


    Normally, I would only buy by the carton - except when I ran out in
    a place like that.

    >It would be easy enough to leave NYC (to Westchester or Nassau County
    >or New Jersey or even Connecticut) on a "cigarette run".


    When I was working on the North side of the Boston metro area (and
    officially living in Connecticut - how's that for a commute), we'd
    make a "sin run" up to the New Hampshire state line - buying booze and
    ciggies in a one-month supply range. It made a difference enough to
    pay for the gas on the 64 Pontiac (with 389 and _dual_ four barrel).
    But then, you also knew to buy gas just outside of Hartford because of
    the perpetual gas war there (25 gallon tank at $0.159 per... yeah, I
    remember the "good ole days").

    It was even worse when working overseas, if I had (limited) access to
    the PX/BX (US Military "general store"). We learned to buy one - one
    carton, or one bottle - because of the risk to being labeled smugglers
    if you took the stuff down town (where I was usually living).

    >> The fines for selling ciggies/booze to underaged do not pay for the
    >> cost of law enforcement, courts, and any incarceration. Those costs
    >> come from the general public even if they don't use the product in
    >> question.

    >
    >True, but then there are many things I pay for that don't affect me.


    Yes, but in the case of selling to underaged, the retailer _USUALLY_
    is aware that they're breaking the law, and are profiting from it.
    The legit retailer has an easy remedy - card everyone. (Remember
    Mayor Koch? I come very close to sharing his 1990 hairline and even so,
    I get carded every time I try to buy booze.) I think the law says to
    card 'under 25' but the retailer just cards everyone to avoid
    discrimination.

    >Much of the time, "my" legislators are doing things for other
    >states/counties/municipalities that I don't live in.


    "Your" legislators??? How much did you pay for them ? Do you get a
    volume discount for owning more than one ? ;-)

    >I'm paying for interstate, state, county, and town roads that I'll
    >never drive on. I'm paying for prisons although I haven't committed
    >any crimes.


    Agreed - those are for the "common good". You may not drive on those
    roads, but your life would be quite different if they didn't exist or
    were not maintained. Same with the prisons - we can't shoot everyone
    who commits a crime.

    >I can't think of any improvement to this system, though.


    Gimme a couple of beers, and I'm sure we can come up with something ;-)

    Old guy

  14. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Aragorn wrote:
    [Belgium]
    > Due to this political crisis - which I think has shocked just about everyone
    > in the country far more than any other political crisis in the last thirty
    > years or so - I have now also joined /be.politics,/ and that group appears
    > to receive an incredibly high traffic.


    I think its merely being in (I assume) Flemish instead of French or a
    mixture says something about which side dominates there.

    > Much to my surprise, apparently my joining there - and perhaps I have sinned
    > against Netiquette as I immediately started replying to some posts right
    > away without respecting the typical one month of lurking - is highly
    > welcomed by those who can think more sanely


    Since you've been keeping up with the news and public opinion, you were
    probably already up to date on the topics.

    > It has now become abundantly clear that
    > the current construct no longer works, and that if we do want to keep
    > this country together, things will simply have to change.


    I've never studied European history, but with all the changes in
    European boundaries in the past 20 years (many nations splitting, and
    one combining), I'd guess major changes would be more acceptable now
    than several decades ago.

    > Yet, in both models of governing so far, the prime minister is the country's
    > CEO. He acts in name of the King, and the King simply signs the laws that
    > are made. However, in between legislations, the King also assigns
    > informers and formation officers.


    I understand what you're saying, but I think that in the U.S., the term
    "informer" has a different connotation. It usually (at least to me)
    implies someone who betrays others, such as a gang member telling the
    police about his gang's (or others') activities in hopes of a lesser
    sentence. I think a clearer term to Americans might be "liason."

    >> In fact, I've heard there's
    >> some problem doing ["My Fair Lady"], or the play "Pygmalion" it's based
    >> on, in other languages, because its point is that in England, accent and
    >> social class are related.

    >
    > Not just in England. I think it's rather common to the whole world that
    > those with lower education speak in dialects whereas those with higher
    > education speak "the proper language". ;-)


    I think it may have been the Swedish production in particular... is
    anyone here familiar enough to know whether upper- and lower-class
    Swedes have similar, or different, accents?

    >> I think that before radio, people heard mainly their own local
    >> pronunciation. Now it's common to hear speakers from all over the
    >> country, indeed the world.

    >
    > I agree. But there will always be puricists who refuse to adopt anything
    > other than [t]hey know.


    One of my college classmates told us how the German Gymnasiums
    (secondary schools) tried to teach the "correct" accent. And I believe
    France has an actual government department that rules on the language.

    > Well, my decision to buy [Mandrake] was rather political, i.e. I wanted to
    > contribute to the community, and considering the fairly and relatively low
    > retail price of such an elaborate PowerPack, I was still cheaper off than
    > anyone using Windows while supporting a good cause. ;-)


    Well, some people embrace GNU/Linux and FOSS out of their convictions,
    and others for technical reasons, and probably most for a combination of
    those. In my case, it's more for technical reasons -- I like the
    feeling that I'm running the computer, instead of the other way around.

    Adam

  15. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >> Does anybody have a chart listing the most active newsgroups
    >> in each hierarchy?

    >
    > Which hierarchies?
    >
    > [compton ~]$ cut -d'.' -f1 .newsrc | sort -u | wc -l
    > 4280
    > [compton ~]$
    >
    > Or do you mean just the 'big eight' plus 'alt.'?


    I was wondering which was the single most active (non-binary) newsgroup
    out of all the hierarchies, to use as a reference for how active other
    groups are. I think number of posts daily would be much better than
    size of all posts. Number of on-topic posts would be even better, but
    logistically nearly impossible.

    And why 'compton'? After the SoCal city? This box is 'eris', after the
    Greek goddess of dischord. You know, the one who offered the golden
    apple "to the fairest".

    >>> Did you ever get that LazyJet working over the network?

    >> Good memory! Yep, bought a straight-through (not crossover) cable and
    >> connected the printer to my DSL modem/router. I had to use ftp to set
    >> up the printer, my router's config screen to set up the router, and MCC
    >> to set up Mandriva, but I got it working.

    >
    > My turn - "ftp" or "telnet"?


    You're right, I had to telnet into the printer. Nowadays I use telnet
    so seldom that I forgot.

    >> Two minor problems, though. One, "normal grayscale" and "high quality"
    >> come out squished to half-height, so I just use "draft grayscale" and
    >> "normal," and use the inkjet when higher quality is needed, which isn't
    >> often.

    >
    > comp.laser-printers
    > comp.periphs.printer
    > comp.periphs.printers
    >
    > The last one is the official group - the others _might_ be helpful. That
    > problem vaguely rings a bell... memory or memory setup?


    Thanks, I'll look into it!

    >> Also, occasionally the printer "moves" -- I set it up as 192.168.1.47
    >> but one day it had become 192.168.1.45.

    >
    > That shouldn't happen. Does this turkey have a battery for CMOS RAM?


    I took someone else's advice, and (using telnet) changed printer config
    from DHCP to USER SPECIFIED. I hope that does it.

    >> When the prices drop some more (like down to $100), I'm planning to
    >> get a 1 TB external USB HD (if I can find one that is both reliable
    >> and quiet), and back up the entire internal HD every night.

    >
    > The only reason I was suggesting a separate computer is speed.


    I don't think the old box is fast enough, and I'm SURE its BIOS couldn't
    handle a HD large enough. At USB 2.0 high speed, I should be able to
    back up my internal HD in under an hour, sometime during the night with
    a cron script.

    BTW I haven't found any ideas for that old box that I liked enough, and
    I couldn't get Damn Small Linux onto it anyway, so I'm thinking I'll
    scrap it. Unless anyone wants a 100 MHz 486 with 48 MB RAM and a 420 MB HD.

    >> I'm planning to implement an off-site backup strategy by occasionally
    >> putting copies of my backup DVD in my car and my parents' house.

    >
    > Parent's house is good - I would NOT use the car for several reasons.
    > In my case, daytime temps in the car are excessive in summer


    Well, so far none of the audio CDs in my car seem to have gotten
    damaged. Blank DVDs are cheap enough so that I might as well put copies
    in both places.

    > My remaining sister has had most of the [medical] problems I'm having


    I seem to have inherited almost all the negative things from both sides
    of my family, so I guess I should consider myself forewarned. And now
    maybe early stages of carpal tunnel, so maybe I need a more ergonomic
    computer setup.

    Thanks again for all your help with everything!

    Adam


  16. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >> Well, I was raised to believe that our (U.S.) system is the best one,

    >
    > Have you not traveled overseas?


    Not much. Mainly several weeks in Israel long ago, right after the
    successful raid on Entebbe when national pride was high.

    > "There is nothing so bad that politics cannot make it worse."
    > -- Thomas Sowell
    >
    > And I believe it was Will Rogers who said something to the effect of
    > "who needs writers when you have politicians". However, it seems the
    > same rules apply in other countries and other political systems.


    George Carlin asked (to paraphrase), "Where are all those honest,
    idealistic people everyone talks about who ought to be running our
    country? It looks like our current politicians are the best we can do."

    Adam


  17. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >> Years ago I had to buy a pack in NYC and was astounded by the price.

    >
    > Normally, I would only buy by the carton - except when I ran out in
    > a place like that.


    Me too, but IIRC I'd suddenly decided to stay overnight and I was afraid
    I'd run out. I can't believe the energy I used to put into worrying
    about running out, even though I don't think I ever did.

    > When I was working on the North side of the Boston metro area [...] we'd
    > make a "sin run" up to the New Hampshire state line - buying booze and
    > ciggies in a one-month supply range.


    I would have gone to CT if cigs had been any cheaper there. I checked.

    > But then, you also knew to buy gas just outside of Hartford because of
    > the perpetual gas war there (25 gallon tank at $0.159 per... yeah, I
    > remember the "good ole days").


    I can remember (early '70s) when cheap local stations were
    $0.299/gallon, but that was years before I was old enough to drive.

    > The legit retailer has an easy remedy - card everyone. (Remember
    > Mayor Koch? I come very close to sharing his 1990 hairline and even so,
    > I get carded every time I try to buy booze.) I think the law says to
    > card 'under 25' but the retailer just cards everyone to avoid
    > discrimination.


    IIRC I only got carded once, and I actually was underage then. Nobody's
    carded me since, and now I definitely look "well over 30." (2002 photo
    at http://www.quitbuddies.org/Buddies26.html#anchor6696 ; one point for
    anyone who knows where it was taken!)

    >> Much of the time, "my" legislators are doing things for other
    >> states/counties/municipalities that I don't live in.

    >
    > "Your" legislators??? How much did you pay for them ?


    Their salaries come from, in part, my taxes. Every once in a while,
    it's actually somebody I voted for.

    >> I can't think of any improvement to this system, though.

    >
    > Gimme a couple of beers, and I'm sure we can come up with something ;-)


    Only if you can prove you're over 21! :-)

    Adam


  18. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Friday 18 July 2008 21:17, someone identifying as *Adam* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > Aragorn wrote:
    > [Belgium]
    >> Due to this political crisis - which I think has shocked just about
    >> everyone in the country far more than any other political crisis in the
    >> last thirty years or so - I have now also joined /be.politics,/ and that
    >> group appears to receive an incredibly high traffic.

    >
    > I think its merely being in (I assume) Flemish instead of French or a
    > mixture says something about which side dominates there.


    It is predominantly Dutch-spoken - and sometimes Flemish dialect, depending
    on who posts - but there are also a few posts in English and German, and
    some are translated via Google, I believe. Some are posts pertaining to
    the USA or the UK, or other countries, and are often mainly anti-Islamic or
    anti-Jewish in nature.

    The bulk of the posting also comprises of - and why does that not surprise
    me - rightwing extremist stuff and ditto copy/pastes of propaganda
    articles.

    >> Much to my surprise, apparently my joining there - and perhaps I have
    >> sinned against Netiquette as I immediately started replying to some posts
    >> right away without respecting the typical one month of lurking - is
    >> highly welcomed by those who can think more sanely

    >
    > Since you've been keeping up with the news and public opinion, you were
    > probably already up to date on the topics.


    Indeed so, but it is incredibly astounding how the extremists simply can't
    seem to grasp what you're saying, keep putting words in your mouth and skip
    just about anything you say to refute their allegations beyond three lines
    of text.

    And, typically of course, if they don't understand what you're talking about
    or if you refuse to swallow their propaganda, they will attack you on your
    personality and will attempt to label you with something.

    >> It has now become abundantly clear that the current construct no longer
    >> works, and that if we do want to keep this country together, things will
    >> simply have to change.

    >
    > I've never studied European history, but with all the changes in
    > European boundaries in the past 20 years (many nations splitting, and
    > one combining), I'd guess major changes would be more acceptable now
    > than several decades ago.


    I'm not so sure about that yet. Europe doesn't quite seem to like the idea
    that the Flemish are fighting for their rights to a fair redistribution of
    responsibilities.

    It also doesn't look like the crisis will be dealt with soon, because the
    King has his own agenda and has already repeatedly refused to meet with the
    representatives of political parties that strive for an abolition of the
    monarchy, even if those parties wish to do so within the context of what is
    legally allowed, and if they are willing to accept compromises.

    The King also seems to favor the French-speaking political parties, but has
    now assigned three representatives who have to pave the way for new
    negotiations. The government and Yves Leterme will stay on in the meantime
    because the King has refused to accept Leterme's resignation.

    >> Yet, in both models of governing so far, the prime minister is the
    >> country's CEO. He acts in name of the King, and the King simply signs
    >> the laws that are made. However, in between legislations, the King also
    >> assigns informers and formation officers.

    >
    > I understand what you're saying, but I think that in the U.S., the term
    > "informer" has a different connotation. It usually (at least to me)
    > implies someone who betrays others, such as a gang member telling the
    > police about his gang's (or others') activities in hopes of a lesser
    > sentence. I think a clearer term to Americans might be "liason."


    I know the American meaning of the word, but it is quite difficult to find a
    proper translation for such archaic terms in our language, which are all
    imbued heavily with originally French semantics. The words for the
    information officer and the formation officer even as used in Dutch are
    actually French words that got adopted into the Belgian variant of Dutch.

    >>> In fact, I've heard there's some problem doing ["My Fair Lady"], or the
    >>> play "Pygmalion" it's based on, in other languages, because its point is
    >>> that in England, accent and social class are related.

    >>
    >> Not just in England. I think it's rather common to the whole world that
    >> those with lower education speak in dialects whereas those with higher
    >> education speak "the proper language". ;-)

    >
    > I think it may have been the Swedish production in particular... is
    > anyone here familiar enough to know whether upper- and lower-class
    > Swedes have similar, or different, accents?


    That I cannot say, but you will typically find less heavy accents here with
    the higher educated, and a general tendency to speak more "civilized" Dutch
    rather than dialects.

    >>> I think that before radio, people heard mainly their own local
    >>> pronunciation. Now it's common to hear speakers from all over the
    >>> country, indeed the world.

    >>
    >> I agree. But there will always be puricists who refuse to adopt anything
    >> other than [t]hey know.

    >
    > One of my college classmates told us how the German Gymnasiums
    > (secondary schools) tried to teach the "correct" accent. And I believe
    > France has an actual government department that rules on the language.


    It's actually surprising how poor the Dutch of the Flemish rightwing
    extremists is - notably in spelling and grammar - and they are the ones who
    supposedly fight for the preservation of our language in the bilingual
    regions.

    >> Well, my decision to buy [Mandrake] was rather political, i.e. I wanted
    >> to contribute to the community, and considering the fairly and relatively
    >> low retail price of such an elaborate PowerPack, I was still cheaper off
    >> than anyone using Windows while supporting a good cause. ;-)

    >
    > Well, some people embrace GNU/Linux and FOSS out of their convictions,
    > and others for technical reasons, and probably most for a combination of
    > those. In my case, it's more for technical reasons -- I like the
    > feeling that I'm running the computer, instead of the other way around.


    I got into it for technical reasons, i.e. I was interested in GNU/Linux as a
    UNIX-style operating system. It was then soon after I had installed it and
    looked around through the on-disk documentation that I got to learn more
    about what FOSS really is and about the GPL, and then I was absolutely
    convinced that this was the right operating system choice for me. :-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  19. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Fri, 18 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >> Or do you mean just the 'big eight' plus 'alt.'?

    >
    >I was wondering which was the single most active (non-binary) newsgroup
    >out of all the hierarchies, to use as a reference for how active other
    >groups are. I think number of posts daily would be much better than
    >size of all posts. Number of on-topic posts would be even better, but
    >logistically nearly impossible.


    Assuming you are speaking about Linux news groups...

    [compton ~]$ grep linux .newsrc | sort -u | wc -l
    209
    [compton ~]$

    Hmmm... that's out of about 1200 groups with the string 'linux' in the
    name. I'm only trying to scan about 40 such groups, and of those, it
    looks like

    alt.os.linux.ubuntu
    comp.os.linux.misc
    alt.os.linux.suse
    alt.os.linux.mandriva
    alt.os.linux
    comp.os.linux
    uk.comp.os.linux
    comp.os.linux.networking
    comp.os.linux.setup
    comp.os.linux.hardware

    for the top ten in that order. a.o.l.u is being targeted by wintrolls,
    and c.o.l.m is hit pretty hard by spammers, but the rankings still are
    the same after pretty harsh killfiles.

    >And why 'compton'? After the SoCal city?


    Nope. 'compton' was the NASA Gamma Ray Observatory. The systems in
    my department at work (as well as those at home) are all named after
    various satellites - NASA and otherwise.

    >>> Also, occasionally the printer "moves" -- I set it up as 192.168.1.47
    >>> but one day it had become 192.168.1.45.

    >>
    >> That shouldn't happen. Does this turkey have a battery for CMOS RAM?

    >
    >I took someone else's advice, and (using telnet) changed printer config
    >from DHCP to USER SPECIFIED. I hope that does it.


    None of the systems at work or at home go for walkies, so I've always
    used static addresses. It avoids a lot of needless confusion, and takes
    only a few seconds longer to initially configure.

    >> The only reason I was suggesting a separate computer is speed.

    >
    >I don't think the old box is fast enough, and I'm SURE its BIOS couldn't
    >handle a HD large enough. At USB 2.0 high speed, I should be able to
    >back up my internal HD in under an hour, sometime during the night with
    >a cron script.


    If it's an ISA bus, it's going to peak out at around 10 MegaBytes per
    second - higher if MCA, EISA, or VESA. The PCI bus is substantially
    faster - but how fast is your network? A full-duplex 100 MegaBIT
    Ethernet can almost be stuffed by a 16 bit ISA card, while MCA, EISA,
    VESA, or PCI can over-stuff any 100BaseT without breathing hard. Are
    you running a local Gigabit LAN?

    >BTW I haven't found any ideas for that old box that I liked enough,
    >and I couldn't get Damn Small Linux onto it anyway, so I'm thinking
    >I'll scrap it. Unless anyone wants a 100 MHz 486 with 48 MB RAM and
    >a 420 MB HD.


    48 Megs makes it tough if you are using X - and 420 is to small for any
    thing modern. I'm using a 520 Meg boot drive on two of the 486s, but
    everything is on a separate set of SCSIs. But then, the firewall box
    is what's left of a 386SX-16 with 16 Megs of RAM and a 345 MB drive -
    no users need apply.

    >> In my case, daytime temps in the car are excessive in summer

    >
    >Well, so far none of the audio CDs in my car seem to have gotten
    >damaged. Blank DVDs are cheap enough so that I might as well put
    >copies in both places.


    It's something to be aware of - if it's cool enough, go for it.

    >> My remaining sister has had most of the [medical] problems I'm having

    >
    >I seem to have inherited almost all the negative things from both sides
    >of my family, so I guess I should consider myself forewarned. And now
    >maybe early stages of carpal tunnel, so maybe I need a more ergonomic
    >computer setup.


    The ergonomic setup is a great idea. Talk to your primary-care, and
    see if [s]he has any recommendations. Arm-rests on the chair, keyboard
    tray beneath the desk surface, and so on.

    Old guy

  20. Re: Hans leads police to Nina's body

    On Fri, 18 Jul 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    Moe Trin wrote:

    >> Have you not traveled overseas?

    >
    >Not much. Mainly several weeks in Israel long ago, right after the
    >successful raid on Entebbe when national pride was high.


    When I got out of high school, it was a given that you had a pretty
    high chance of getting drafted, and if you did, it was going to be
    the Army and stationed at Camp Swampy at best. About a quarter of
    my class volunteered for other branches - I went into the Air Farce
    where I spent 3 of 4 years in Europe. After I got out, I got the
    usual humdrum job at the local slave shop. I stayed there for 15
    months before going up to Boston to get a job that would send me back
    overseas. A month later, I'm helping to rebuild a radar at El Dorado
    airport in Bogota, Columbia, two months later doing the same thing in
    N'Djamena in Chad, and so on. About a year later, I'm on my first stint
    in SEA. I've worked overseas about a quarter of my working life, and
    would do it the same way if the chance came. It was enjoyable and
    interesting.

    >George Carlin asked (to paraphrase), "Where are all those honest,
    >idealistic people everyone talks about who ought to be running our
    >country? It looks like our current politicians are the best we can do."


    Some one else said "If $DEITY wanted us to vote, [s]he would have given
    us a choice of useful candidates!".

    Old guy