Hans leads police to Nina's body - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Hans leads police to Nina's body - Mandriva ; Adam wrote: > Okay, clear enough. So a "90 degree electrical length" antenna would be > 1/4 of the wavelength. But I kind of assumed antennas ought to be full- > or half- or quarter- or eighth-, etc. wavelength. I ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 12 of 14 FirstFirst ... 2 10 11 12 13 14 LastLast
Results 221 to 240 of 280

Thread: Hans leads police to Nina's body

  1. Re: Broadcasting

    Adam wrote:

    > Okay, clear enough. So a "90 degree electrical length" antenna would be
    > 1/4 of the wavelength. But I kind of assumed antennas ought to be full-
    > or half- or quarter- or eighth-, etc. wavelength. I guess not.


    Certainly not! In many instances, physical quarter-wave antennas are too
    big for their location, so all sorts of tricks are commonly used to make
    them /appear/ to be the "right" length. This is particularly common in the
    amateur radio world, because most hams have limited "real estate".

    For example, I have a garden that's 32 metres long (big for London), and the
    house is 15 metres at its highest point. My "top band" (160 m, 1.8 - 2.0
    MHz) antenna /cannot/ be a quarter-wavelength long. Also, I predominantly
    want vertical polarisation.

    My solution is to use a vertical length of UR 67 coax with the outer braid
    connected to an upper and lower horizontal wire to a tree at the end of the
    garden. The horizontals are at 5 and 15 metres above ground and are
    connected together with an 11 metre vertical section at the far end - this
    forms a large, almost rectangular, vertical loop over the garden,
    The /inner/ of the coax is driven, so the coax is (effectively) a
    transformer. The match is pretty good over the whole band, and will also
    resonate well on the other harmonically related bands too. The results are
    very good, despite the limited space available.

    C.

  2. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    I'm sorry about taking so long to reply, but I was having problems with
    my internal DVD burner. After much effort, I diagnosed the problem:
    it's broken. The whole system is technically in warranty, but I figure
    it will be easier, and faster, to just buy a drive from NewEgg, under
    $40 including shipping. Is it safe to assume that most current internal
    optical drives will work smoothly with Mandriva 2008.0 and 2009.0?

    Also, this is my second consecutive system where the first part to fail
    was the internal optical drive. Is that often the first thing to go?

    >> In this case, I'm assuming anyone willing to invoke a
    >> script from the command line can use some text editor on it to change
    >> some of the defaults, which are pointed out at the start.

    >
    > One possible caution - those who use a "real" *nix editor won't have
    > a problem, but some of the other editors may have features that can
    > cause problems.


    That's true, but I'm not going to worry about every conceivable
    complication. If someone or something does mangle this script, it won't
    do anything dangerous anyway. I have to draw the line somewhere on how
    much hand-holding to do. Does anyone think I'm erring too much one way
    or the other?

    > You also see this with functions - sub-routines if you may - where the
    > variables are set here, and the action takes place at the other end of
    > the countr^H^H^H^H^H^Hscript. If it gets messy, there will be a
    > piece of paper with the variable name and contents so I can figure who
    > is doing what to whom.


    Back when you could count on every computer having MBASIC, I wrote a
    little program and then deliberately made it into the worst undocumented
    spaghetti code I could imagine, which was pretty easy with BASIC. I
    don't think there's a single instance where control proceeds normally to
    the next line. It's temporarily at
    http://mysite.verizon.net/adam707/LOADMAP.TXT .

    > ["The Crookedest Street in the World"]
    >
    > the Muni covers the city pretty well, so
    > getting to/from work is pretty easy.


    Yes, in my few hours' tour of SF, my "guide" (someone I know from
    another NG) was able to show me quite a bit of the city, entirely using
    public transportation. I got used to something like that during my two
    years in Baltimore (pre-subway)... I never bothered with bus schedules;
    I could just go to the bus stop, confident one would be along soon.

    Around here, I'd describe public transportation as "inadequate." When I
    pick my car up from the body shop, I'm fortunate that there's a bus that
    stops within a mile of my home, and a mile of the body shop, even if it
    only runs four times a day.

    > recall that Lombard drops
    > about 75 or 80 feet from Hyde down to Leavenworth. That's the rough
    > equivalent of 7 or 8 stories. While there are stairs on the North side
    > of the street, I rather doubt many would like climbing them.


    Reminds me of Laurel and Hardy's "The Music Box," where they have to
    deliver a piano to a house at the top of 131 steps.

    > My
    > mother-in-law lived about 4 blocks away from there, in a third floor
    > apartment. She swore she was never going to move out of there just
    > because of the hassle with the movers.


    So what happened?

    >> in lower Manhattan. From about a dozen flights
    >> up, you could look straight along 8th Ave. from 14th St. to at least
    >> Columbus Circle (59th St.). Especially impressive after dark.

    >
    > My map says that's about two miles.


    Yep, Manhattan lore is that 20 short blocks (e.g. 33rd St. to 34th St.)
    make a mile.

    > There are similar vistas in the
    > city, but while I like the convenience of being there, I like my space
    > a bit more.


    Probably because of where I grew up, I'm not awed at rural scenes. I'm
    more impressed with metropolitan life. Before I had to move in late
    '05, there were all sorts of stores, restaurants, and other businesses
    within walking distance, over city streets with sidewalks.

    >> Another cousin showed me the shacks of Cupertino, including the
    >> obligatory junked cars and the tarps used as roof repair. Honest!

    >
    > A lot of that depends on _where_ in Cupertino. The Northern half of
    > the city is older - 1950s - and some of it was pretty slap-dash
    > construction - 3/1s, about 850 square foot, flat (tar/gravel) roof
    > lots roughly 55 to 75 feet wide depending on neighborhood. As you
    > got closer to the hills to the Southwest, the neighborhoods were
    > younger and the houses a bit more diversified.


    The last junction before getting to the shacks was Stevens Canyon Rd. &
    Mt. Eden Rd., which seems to place it SW of Cupertino itself.

    > By the way, you
    > wouldn't want to think about the prices that area was getting (not
    > just 'asking') for those houses.


    I've heard! My cousin wanted to buy the house she was renting in Los
    Gatos, but just couldn't afford it.

    Adam

  3. Re: Broadcasting

    Christopher Hunter wrote:
    >> I kind of assumed antennas ought to be full-
    >> or half- or quarter- or eighth-, etc. wavelength. I guess not.

    >
    > Certainly not! In many instances, physical quarter-wave antennas are too
    > big for their location, so all sorts of tricks are commonly used to make
    > them /appear/ to be the "right" length.


    Thanks, Christopher! I was assuming that a harmonic would be the best
    antenna length, but there's clearly a lot more to the science of
    antennas than I realized.

    > For example, I have a garden that's 32 metres long (big for London)


    Inside any U.S. city, that would be large too.

    > I predominantly want vertical polarisation.


    I had to look this up... I gather this means your signal would be
    equally strong in all directions, even though the horizontals of your
    antenna are running in one particular direction.

    > My solution is to use a vertical length of UR 67 coax with the outer braid
    > connected to an upper and lower horizontal wire to a tree at the end of the
    > garden. The horizontals are at 5 and 15 metres above ground and are
    > connected together with an 11 metre vertical section at the far end - this
    > forms a large, almost rectangular, vertical loop over the garden


    I had to draw this, but I can picture it. But isn't the vertical at the
    tree equal to the fourth (or is that fifth?) harmonic, 1/16 of 160m?
    ,
    > The /inner/ of the coax is driven, so the coax is (effectively) a
    > transformer. The match is pretty good over the whole band, and will also
    > resonate well on the other harmonically related bands too. The results are
    > very good, despite the limited space available.


    I can see that if I ever want to transmit anything, I've got a lot to
    learn. Thanks again for a most informative explanation!

    Adam

  4. Re: Broadcasting

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > On Mon, 29 Sep 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in
    > article , Adam wrote:
    >
    >>Moe Trin wrote:

    >
    >>> The length relating to the wavelength.

    >>
    >>Okay, clear enough. So a "90 degree electrical length" antenna would
    >>be 1/4 of the wavelength.

    >
    > Exactly.
    >
    >>But I kind of assumed antennas ought to be full- or half- or quarter-
    >>or eighth-, etc. wavelength. I guess not.

    >
    > Full wavelength - no, the extra height is awfully expensive for very
    > little gain in performance. 5/8ths wave is usually the maximum, and
    > that only in limited cases. The taller tower puts less energy up into
    > the heavens (actually the ionosphere) and that reduces the amount of
    > "sky wave" (the night-time cause of you being able to hear stations
    > up to several hundred miles away. Half wave is otherwise optimal, but
    > it's a cost factor, and I have seen antennas a lot shorter - down to
    > a tenth wavelength in one case.


    We have to do AM band vertical antennas that are limited to 10 m tall
    for "restricted Service Licence" stations. We're also limited to 1 Watt
    ERP.

    A short antenna like that is a real pain to work with, and as you get
    something approaching a match (with whatever network you use), the
    bandwidth falls to the point that it becomes almost useless for
    broadcasting. I have built antennas with capacity hats on them that
    were /bigger/ than the height of the vertical radiator in an effort to get
    some bandwidth!

    In my experience, good grounding is as important as the antenna itself.

    C.

  5. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    On Sun, 05 Oct 2008 17:12:52 -0400, Adam wrote:

    > Also, this is my second consecutive system where the first part to fail
    > was the internal optical drive. Is that often the first thing to go?


    I've had several burner drives fail in the last few years. It looks as
    if the manufacturers know that most people never burn more than a dozen
    discs over the lifetime of a machine, and build the drives to last just
    long enough.

    CD-ROM and DVD-ROM drives seem to last almost forever by comparison, the
    only failure I've seen was in one that was dropped onto a solid floor
    while in transit between boxes.

  6. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    Mark Madsen wrote:
    > CD-ROM and DVD-ROM drives seem to last almost forever by comparison, the
    > only failure I've seen was in one that was dropped onto a solid floor
    > while in transit between boxes.


    Hmmm... on my previous box, a "white box" special made of cheap parts,
    it was the CD-ROM drive that failed, within a year IIRC. On this one,
    the DVD burner (a Hitachi-LG GSA-H60L, it turned out) failed after about
    ten months, while it was still under warranty. And this one is a
    name-brand computer, so there is a manufacturer's reputation for them to
    be concerned about.

    Oddly enough, both of my parents' previous two systems (one from a local
    shop, one name-brand) had a WD HD as the first hardware failure.

    Adam

  7. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    On Sun, 05 Oct 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >I'm sorry about taking so long to reply, but I was having problems
    >with my internal DVD burner. After much effort, I diagnosed the
    >problem: it's broken. The whole system is technically in warranty,
    >but I figure it will be easier, and faster, to just buy a drive from
    >NewEgg, under $40 including shipping.


    If it's under warranty, I'd consider shipping it back for repairs
    and then retaining it as a spare (or selling it on flea-bay).

    >Also, this is my second consecutive system where the first part to
    >fail was the internal optical drive. Is that often the first thing
    >to go?


    Most of the systems I have are recycled (from work, and neighborhood
    garage sales). I let others "burn in" the hardware for me ;-)

    >> One possible caution - those who use a "real" *nix editor won't have
    >> a problem, but some of the other editors may have features that can
    >> cause problems.

    >
    >That's true, but I'm not going to worry about every conceivable
    >complication. If someone or something does mangle this script, it
    >won't do anything dangerous anyway. I have to draw the line somewhere
    >on how much hand-holding to do. Does anyone think I'm erring too much
    >one way or the other?


    I mention it only if you have user input that may make the lines long.

    >> You also see this with functions - sub-routines if you may - where
    >> the variables are set here, and the action takes place at the other
    >> end of the countr^H^H^H^H^H^Hscript. If it gets messy, there will
    >> be a piece of paper with the variable name and contents so I can
    >> figure who is doing what to whom.

    >
    >Back when you could count on every computer having MBASIC, I wrote a
    >little program and then deliberately made it into the worst
    >undocumented spaghetti code I could imagine, which was pretty easy
    >with BASIC. I don't think there's a single instance where control
    >proceeds normally to the next line.


    Probably one of the first dozen or so programs I wrote for MS Basic
    (as supplied on the IBM PC) was a cross-reference generator. This,
    after discovering the microsoft was being helpful, and undefined
    variables were assumed to be "0" or a null string as appropriate. So
    you typ0'ed a list, it would happily run providing garbage answers
    rather than barf over an un-initialized variable.

    >> the Muni covers the city pretty well, so
    >> getting to/from work is pretty easy.

    >
    >Yes, in my few hours' tour of SF, my "guide" (someone I know from
    >another NG) was able to show me quite a bit of the city, entirely
    >using public transportation. I got used to something like that during
    >my two years in Baltimore (pre-subway)... I never bothered with bus
    >schedules; I could just go to the bus stop, confident one would be
    >along soon.


    About half the time I went in to the city, I'd drive up to the BART
    station (either in Daly City, or Fremont, depending where I was
    starting from), and use the bus. If I did have to take the car, I
    knew I was going to be taken by the parking fees.

    >Around here, I'd describe public transportation as "inadequate." When
    >I pick my car up from the body shop, I'm fortunate that there's a bus
    >that stops within a mile of my home, and a mile of the body shop, even
    >if it only runs four times a day.


    Well... lesee - the number 90 bus runs every half hour from 05:45 to
    21:15, and is 7.2 miles from the house. Two transfers and 71 minutes
    later, I have a half mile walk to reach work. It's 20 minutes by car.
    My wife can grab the number 44 bus 7.3 miles in a different direction,
    also make two changes, and 96 minutes later is ready for a third of a
    mile walk. It's 25 minutes by car.

    >> While there are stairs on the North side of the street, I rather
    >> doubt many would like climbing them.

    >
    >Reminds me of Laurel and Hardy's "The Music Box," where they have to
    >deliver a piano to a house at the top of 131 steps.


    At least on Lombard, if you can find a place to unload up on Hyde, it's
    down hill - do mind the brakes on that piano - you don't want it
    missing a switch-back turn and going through someone's window.

    >> She swore she was never going to move out of there just because of
    >> the hassle with the movers.

    >
    >So what happened?


    The children finally had to move the stuff - most of it in cardboard
    boxes - after she died. The furniture went to Good Will or St. Vincent
    de Paul, but they had to remove it.

    >> I like my space a bit more.

    >
    >Probably because of where I grew up, I'm not awed at rural scenes.
    >I'm more impressed with metropolitan life. Before I had to move in
    >late '05, there were all sorts of stores, restaurants, and other
    >businesses within walking distance, over city streets with sidewalks.


    I know what you're saying - I'm referring to growing up in New England
    where both sisters had an acre + in an older part of town. I'm not
    specifically a 'country boy' - and in spite of my current location
    being "out in the Boonies", I'm still in the city of Phoenix.

    >The last junction before getting to the shacks was Stevens Canyon Rd. &
    >Mt. Eden Rd., which seems to place it SW of Cupertino itself.


    I could be wrong, but that intersection is not in Cupertino - that's
    unincorporated (county) land.

    >> By the way, you wouldn't want to think about the prices that area
    >> was getting (not just 'asking') for those houses.

    >
    >I've heard! My cousin wanted to buy the house she was renting in Los
    >Gatos, but just couldn't afford it.


    We had the same problem when we were looking to buy, except we were on
    the Mountain View / Palo Alto border. We'd been there for about a year,
    and the rent on a 3/2 Eichler ~900 square and a flat roof built in ~1960
    was $1100 a month. The agent estimated the place was ~265k... for that
    piece of junk???? Wow. We bought a 1100 square 3/1 in Mountain View
    for about half that - that was in 1980. About five years ago, I heard
    from a ex-neighbor that the last two sales on the block were over 550k.
    Like I said - obscene prices, but where else can you build?

    Old guy

  8. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >> I was having problems with my internal DVD burner. [...]
    >> The whole system is technically in warranty,
    >> but I figure it will be easier, and faster, to just buy a drive from
    >> NewEgg, under $40 including shipping.

    >
    > If it's under warranty, I'd consider shipping it back for repairs
    > and then retaining it as a spare (or selling it on flea-bay).


    Good idea! I'd been assuming that the warranty required lugging or
    shipping the entire system, and/or opening the case voided the warranty.

    For everybody's reference, what I bought was an Asus DRW-2014L1T
    DVD+/-R/RW drive (SATA with Lightscribe) from NewEgg, and of course it
    went on sale immediately afterwards. I just plugged it in, fixed up
    /etc/fstab (I'd been using other drives as stopgaps), and Mandriva
    2008.0 and k3b had no problems with it. It's not quite as fast as the
    LG GSA-H60L it replaced, but I'm satisfied so far.

    > Most of the systems I have are recycled (from work, and neighborhood
    > garage sales). I let others "burn in" the hardware for me ;-)


    Another method is to get a system that someone's discarding because it
    doesn't work, and just replace the one defective piece.

    > Probably one of the first dozen or so programs I wrote for MS Basic
    > (as supplied on the IBM PC) was a cross-reference generator. This,
    > after discovering the microsoft was being helpful, and undefined
    > variables were assumed to be "0" or a null string as appropriate. So
    > you typ0'ed a list, it would happily run providing garbage answers
    > rather than barf over an un-initialized variable.


    That's a feature, not a bug :-) . One of my class projects ca. 1990 was
    an executable to be run from within IBM BASIC (SHELL "VARDUMP") that
    displayed all current variables, among other things. That would have
    come in handy except I was no longer programming in BASIC by that time.
    If anybody still wants the Turbo Pascal source or the executable (I
    save way too many things!), email me.

    Another program I've just taken an interest in is 'fortune'. I mean, I
    knew it was there all along but I'm just now starting to add to it. I
    just added a few quotes from "A Thousand Clowns." One of my favorites
    is "There's the people who spill things, and the people who get spilled
    on; I do not choose to notice the stains." Does anyone have any
    favorite fortunes, or URLs for same, that they think I should add to it?

    >> Reminds me of Laurel and Hardy's "The Music Box," where they have to
    >> deliver a piano to a house at the top of 131 steps.

    >
    > At least on Lombard, if you can find a place to unload up on Hyde, it's
    > down hill - do mind the brakes on that piano - you don't want it
    > missing a switch-back turn and going through someone's window.


    L&H managed to get it through several windows anyway.

    For me, the one NoCal "must see" sight was elsewhere; see
    http://mysite.verizon.net/adam707/Leona.jpg . You do know where that
    is, don't you? :-)

    >> The last junction before getting to the shacks was Stevens Canyon Rd. &
    >> Mt. Eden Rd., which seems to place it SW of Cupertino itself.

    >
    > I could be wrong, but that intersection is not in Cupertino - that's
    > unincorporated (county) land.


    Probably, but that's how my cousin described it, and she grew up in
    Cupertino where a freeway is now.

    > Like I said - obscene prices, but where else can you build?


    This area is getting to be like that too, as the NYC commuters keep
    moving farther away.

    Adam
    --
    Email: adam seven zero seven AT verizon DOT net

  9. Re: Broadcasting

    Moe Trin wrote:

    >> Hmmm... I still have a Model 500 Desk Set complete with metal dial
    >> stop, but I do have DSL service. Think it's worth trying?
    >> (Connecting it before the DSL microfilter, of course.)

    >
    > I suspect not - the DSL crap should blanket anything you might pick up
    > otherwise.


    It worked! Without it, my receiver found no AM stations. With it, it
    found several stations, including, I think, WFED at 1500 kHz which is 50
    kW 300 miles away.

    >> High speed Ektachrome daylight then was 160 and tungsten was 125.

    >
    > I don't recall using the tungsten version. I recall blue flashbulbs
    > to allow you to use the daylight version.


    Yep, I used the little AG1Bs (AG1 + blue coating) myself, but not many
    of the larger 5Bs. Ektachrome tungsten (balanced for 3200K) was mainly
    meant for studio lighting, like that TV show, and that was the only roll
    of it I ever shot. For amateurs shooting color negatives all that was
    irrelevant, as the lab would adjust the color when printing.

    Aside: Last year I looked through some of my father's 35mm slides from
    1958-60, vacations and parties and such. The Kodachromes still looked
    great. The Ektachromes had mostly faded to a rust-brown, though
    sometimes there were indications of what the original colors had been.

    > My first camera was 50+ years ago - can't even remember who made it
    > (possibly an Ansco C3 that had adjustments!!! 2 F stops on a fixed
    > lens, and 2 shutter speeds).


    Do you mean Argus C3, aka "brick"? That had a range of shutter speeds
    and apertures. I shot a roll with one last year out of curiosity and
    soon understood why its main use was as a trade-in.

    > and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't
    > _everyone_ own an F2?) from the mid-60s to 70s


    Not me. I went straight from an Instamatic to a Canon 35mm SLR in '77,
    and it's still my "main" camera. It's the last of the all-mechanical
    kind. The only thing the battery powers is the exposure meter.

    [Ernie Kovacs]
    > Like I said - he was absolutely unique.


    I think that's one of the rare examples of someone who was ahead of his
    time. I wish more of his stuff was available.

    >>> Then there was also the "Nairobi Trio"...

    >> Yep... my grandmother actually had the 45 with that song on it.

    >
    > I can still hear that darn thing in my mind


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Uw03hS_EMY

    Adam

  10. Re: Broadcasting

    Adam wrote:
    > Moe Trin wrote:


    >> My first camera was 50+ years ago - can't even remember who made it
    >> (possibly an Ansco C3 that had adjustments!!! 2 F stops on a fixed
    >> lens, and 2 shutter speeds).

    >
    > Do you mean Argus C3, aka "brick"? That had a range of shutter speeds
    > and apertures. I shot a roll with one last year out of curiosity and
    > soon understood why its main use was as a trade-in.


    Coincidentally, Mamiya also made a C3. I still have mine; here it is:

    http://blinkynet.net/stuff/c3.jpg

    >> and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't
    >> _everyone_ own an F2?) from the mid-60s to 70s


    Nope. I still have my Pentax system, with five lenses, extension tubes,
    extenders, etc.

    I'm Nikonian with my DSLR, though.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  11. Re: Broadcasting

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 23:58:53 -0700, Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > Coincidentally, Mamiya also made a C3. I still have mine; here it is:
    >
    > http://blinkynet.net/stuff/c3.jpg


    I'm way more modern than you. Mine is a C33.

    :-)

    >>> and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't
    >>> _everyone_ own an F2?) from the mid-60s to 70s


    The FM2 was way better. Batteries for cameras were (even more) crap in
    the 70s.

    > Nope. I still have my Pentax system, with five lenses, extension tubes,
    > extenders, etc.


    The most tragic white elephant I have is the EOS 5. Modern enough to be
    usable and hopelessly tied to film, but not unusual or interesting enough
    to show to guests.

    Guess I'll wait another 30 years and put it on display with my Mandrake
    10.1 CDs...?

  12. Re: Broadcasting

    Mark Madsen wrote:

    > On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 23:58:53 -0700, Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >
    >> Coincidentally, Mamiya also made a C3. I still have mine; here it is:
    >>
    >> http://blinkynet.net/stuff/c3.jpg

    >
    > I'm way more modern than you. Mine is a C33.
    >
    > :-)


    Showoff!


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  13. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >>> The whole system is technically in warranty, but I figure it will
    >>> be easier, and faster, to just buy a drive from NewEgg, under $40
    >>> including shipping.

    >
    >> If it's under warranty, I'd consider shipping it back for repairs
    >> and then retaining it as a spare (or selling it on flea-bay).

    >
    >Good idea! I'd been assuming that the warranty required lugging or
    >shipping the entire system, and/or opening the case voided the
    >warranty.


    Obviously, you should check the fine print, but if you are worried
    about the system warranty, you've probably voided that by unpacking
    the system and turning it on ;-)

    >from NewEgg, and of course it went on sale immediately afterwards.


    Could be worse - you could be heavy in banking and retail stocks.

    >> Most of the systems I have are recycled (from work, and
    >> neighborhood garage sales).


    >Another method is to get a system that someone's discarding because
    >it doesn't work, and just replace the one defective piece.


    Most of the systems I see at garage sales are being sold because
    they lack the horsepower to run the latest version of virus-ware.
    I'm not into the GUIs, so they are usually overkill for Linux.

    >> This, after discovering the microsoft was being helpful, and
    >> undefined variables were assumed to be "0" or a null string as
    >> appropriate.


    >That's a feature, not a bug :-)


    I understand it was the way Gates original basic interpreter he
    wrote for the Atari. Don't EVER embarrass the user by pointing out
    a mistake (other than "Bad Command Or Filename"), but just fake it
    and the user won't know the difference anyway.

    >For me, the one NoCal "must see" sight was elsewhere; see
    >http://mysite.verizon.net/adam707/Leona.jpg . You do know where that
    >is, don't you? :-)


    Actually, I don't recognize it

    >> I could be wrong, but that intersection is not in Cupertino - that's
    >> unincorporated (county) land.

    >
    >Probably, but that's how my cousin described it, and she grew up in
    >Cupertino where a freeway is now.


    There are two - I-280 (which loops around the bay area) and CA-85 which
    runs from Moffett through Los Gatos back to the US-101 at the Southeast
    end of San Jose (basically a loop South around San Jose).

    >> Like I said - obscene prices, but where else can you build?

    >
    >This area is getting to be like that too, as the NYC commuters keep
    >moving farther away.


    I didn't think it was that bad - but I knew commuters were ranging far
    an wide trying to find something affordable - only later do they start
    thinking about the price of gas/what-ever and the time to make that
    commute.

    Old guy

  14. Re: Broadcasting

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >> I suspect not - the DSL crap should blanket anything you might pick
    >> up otherwise.

    >
    >It worked! Without it, my receiver found no AM stations. With it, it
    >found several stations, including, I think, WFED at 1500 kHz which is 50
    >kW 300 miles away.


    Normal AM radio antennas need not be very long - all you're doing is
    providing enough RF and noise to override the noise of the receiver.
    Think of the classic 'car radio antenna' - perhaps a meter long, in
    comparison to the signals it's receiving of 540-1700 KHz which is
    556 to 176 meters.

    >> I don't recall using the tungsten version. I recall blue flashbulbs
    >> to allow you to use the daylight version.

    >
    >Yep, I used the little AG1Bs (AG1 + blue coating) myself, but not many
    >of the larger 5Bs.


    I've still got a flash holder for 5/5B bulbs - about 7 inch diameter
    reflector, mounted on a tube that held 4 'D' cells.

    >Aside: Last year I looked through some of my father's 35mm slides from
    >1958-60, vacations and parties and such. The Kodachromes still looked
    >great. The Ektachromes had mostly faded to a rust-brown, though
    >sometimes there were indications of what the original colors had been.


    I don't even think it took that long - I've still got trays of slides
    for the Braun slide projector (and only two lamps left) that were
    basically gone after 30 years.

    >> My first camera was 50+ years ago - can't even remember who made it
    >> (possibly an Ansco C3 that had adjustments!!! 2 F stops on a fixed
    >> lens, and 2 shutter speeds).

    >
    >Do you mean Argus C3, aka "brick"? That had a range of shutter speeds
    >and apertures. I shot a roll with one last year out of curiosity and
    >soon understood why its main use was as a trade-in.


    No, memory is rather hazy (I sold the camera ~1960 soon after buying
    my second German SLR), but I know it only had two shutter speeds and
    two F/stops - and I'm not sure that it wasn't some other film size
    besides 135, but can't for the life of me think what. It had a
    separate view-finder, but I don't recall it having a focus adjustment,
    though I'm pretty sure it did (view-finder was fixed focus).

    >> and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't _everyone_ own an F2?) from the
    >>mid-60s to 70s


    My sister and brother-in-law were minor professionals (she for the
    paper, he for the police) and went absolutely nuts when I started
    teaching in Japan. I wasn't that thrilled with the Nikon, because I
    already had a (relatively) decent selection of lenses that were
    screw-in, rather than bayonet. I think I wound up buying three F2
    bodies and about a dozen lenses for them.

    [Ernie Kovacs]

    >> Like I said - he was absolutely unique.

    >
    >I think that's one of the rare examples of someone who was ahead of his
    >time. I wish more of his stuff was available.


    He was doing things in the 1950s that others didn't discover until the
    1970s. But there-in lies the problem - he was live and kinescoped,
    and about the main thing left is early tapes and a very few clapped
    out kinescopes (I exclude his movies). I still recall a station-break
    card that I'm guessing is from a 1950 afternoon show - it showed a
    character with Ernie's face standing about half-way up a model of the
    WPTZ television tower (self-supporting type reminiscent of the Tower
    Eiffel) scaled about 2 or 3 times his height. He's waving, while
    holding his cigar. "Be right back!"

    Old guy

  15. Re: Broadcasting

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Blinky the Shark wrote:

    >Adam wrote:


    >> Moe Trin wrote:


    >>> My first camera was 50+ years ago - can't even remember who made it
    >>> (possibly an Ansco C3 that had adjustments!!! 2 F stops on a fixed
    >>> lens, and 2 shutter speeds).

    >>
    >> Do you mean Argus C3, aka "brick"? That had a range of shutter speeds
    >> and apertures. I shot a roll with one last year out of curiosity and
    >> soon understood why its main use was as a trade-in.

    >
    >Coincidentally, Mamiya also made a C3. I still have mine; here it is:
    >
    >http://blinkynet.net/stuff/c3.jpg


    No, this was something I picked up in the PX at Lowery AFB (Denver) in
    late 1959. I probably shot a dozen or so rolls of film through it in
    total. I was assigned to Europe, and using the fabulous pay of an E2
    (about $80 a month) bought up to a "real" camera (Edixa-flex) and even
    bought a (135 mm/F3.5) telephoto lens for it!!! Big Spender, that's me.

    >>> and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't _everyone_ own an F2?)


    >Nope. I still have my Pentax system, with five lenses, extension tubes,
    >extenders, etc.


    See my response to Adam - I stuck with the screw-in lens system
    mainly because I had a decent selection. Having to start again from
    scratch with a bayonet system didn't appeal to me, much as I appreciate
    their glass-ware.

    Old guy

  16. Re: Broadcasting

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > On Thu, 09 Oct 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    > , Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >
    >>Adam wrote:

    >
    >>> Moe Trin wrote:

    >
    >>>> My first camera was 50+ years ago - can't even remember who made it
    >>>> (possibly an Ansco C3 that had adjustments!!! 2 F stops on a fixed
    >>>> lens, and 2 shutter speeds).
    >>>
    >>> Do you mean Argus C3, aka "brick"? That had a range of shutter speeds
    >>> and apertures. I shot a roll with one last year out of curiosity and
    >>> soon understood why its main use was as a trade-in.

    >>
    >>Coincidentally, Mamiya also made a C3. I still have mine; here it is:
    >>
    >>http://blinkynet.net/stuff/c3.jpg

    >
    > No, this was something I picked up in the PX at Lowery AFB (Denver) in
    > late 1959. I probably shot a dozen or so rolls of film through it in


    "No"? No what? I wasn't saying you did not have an Ansco C3. I clearly
    said that I had and have a Mamiya C3. That reflects not a bit on your
    cameras.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  17. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    Moe Trin wrote:

    >>> Most of the systems I have are recycled (from work, and
    >>> neighborhood garage sales).


    I have several junked machines that have been restored to full working order
    by the replacement or addition of known-good components. Many of them were
    obtained by "skip-diving"!

    > Most of the systems I see at garage sales are being sold because
    > they lack the horsepower to run the latest version of virus-ware.


    Usually, they've just become so riddled with viruses and other malware that
    they are entirely useless (in the eyes of the original owner) - a hard
    drive format, the installation of some more RAM (usually), possibly a NIC,
    and a proper operating system, and you have a perfectly good working
    machine.

    One of the best "wins" I had a few years ago, was when the "CIH" virus was
    crippling Windows machines - it "flashed" the BIOS after promulgating
    itself a few times, making the machines unbootable. A quick flash of the
    BIOS, and the machine would then work. I "won" a heap of Dell Optiplex
    machines that way - the company that owned them just gave them away
    as "broken".

    C.

  18. Re: Scripting, UPS Selection, etc.

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >>> If it's under warranty, I'd consider shipping it back for repairs

    >
    > Obviously, you should check the fine print, but if you are worried
    > about the system warranty, you've probably voided that by unpacking
    > the system and turning it on ;-)


    I'll look into it -- I bought this system in early December '07, and it
    has a "1 year limited warranty" -- I must have that and my receipt
    around here SOMEwhere. OTOH I'm not going to let myself get too upset
    over a relatively inexpensive component.

    >>from NewEgg, and of course it went on sale immediately afterwards.

    >
    > Could be worse - you could be heavy in banking and retail stocks.


    I emailed NewEgg asking if I could get the difference back, and got
    boilerplate that said "no."

    >>> undefined variables were assumed to be "0" or a null string

    >
    > I understand it was the way Gates original basic interpreter he
    > wrote for the Atari.


    I assume you meant "Altair." Somewhere I have, or had, the 8080 source
    for Palo Alto Tiny Basic that was adapted into the original
    (pre-Microsoft) TRS-80 BASIC, but I don't remember how that handled
    uninitialized variables.

    >> For me, the one NoCal "must see" sight was elsewhere; see
    >> http://mysite.verizon.net/adam707/Leona.jpg . You do know where that
    >> is, don't you? :-)

    >
    > Actually, I don't recognize it


    You don't??? Los Gatos, of course! Leo and Leona are iconic symbols of
    that city.

    http://www.metroactive.com/metro/10....tory-0742.html

    They're along the N side of 17 just W of the city itself.

    >> This area is getting to be like that too, as the NYC commuters keep
    >> moving farther away.

    >
    > I didn't think it was that bad - but I knew commuters were ranging far
    > an wide trying to find something affordable - only later do they start
    > thinking about the price of gas/what-ever and the time to make that
    > commute.


    The commuter trains have gone as far north as Poughkeepsie for decades,
    right along the river. You can see some of the rail line in the movie
    "Hello Dolly". Yep, commuters are moving this far out, and housing
    prices are going up accordingly.

    Adam

  19. Re: Broadcasting

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >> Last year I looked through some of my father's 35mm slides from
    >> 1958-60, vacations and parties and such. The Kodachromes still looked
    >> great. The Ektachromes had mostly faded to a rust-brown, though
    >> sometimes there were indications of what the original colors had been.

    >
    > I don't even think it took that long - I've still got trays of slides
    > for the Braun slide projector (and only two lamps left) that were
    > basically gone after 30 years.


    Hmm... some of MY slides are over 30 years old. I'll have to check them
    out. (I still have one wall blank where I'll eventually put
    enlargements of my favorite shots.) The 8mm home movies from the early
    '60s, all Kodachrome -- well, Mom said the colors were a little faded,
    but they looked fine to me.

    > I wasn't that thrilled with the Nikon, because I
    > already had a (relatively) decent selection of lenses that were
    > screw-in, rather than bayonet. I think I wound up buying three F2
    > bodies and about a dozen lenses for them.


    That's one reason I haven't gone digital yet. A system as good as the
    film one I have now would get pricey.

    > using the fabulous pay of an E2
    > (about $80 a month) bought up to a "real" camera (Edixa-flex) and even
    > bought a (135 mm/F3.5) telephoto lens for it!!! Big Spender, that's me.


    Most of the system I'm still using is from 1976-1978. It still works,
    so I'm still using it. I took B/W Photog I using it at the local
    community college last year, and got an A from a teacher who seldom
    gives out As.

    > See my response to Adam - I stuck with the screw-in lens system
    > mainly because I had a decent selection. Having to start again from
    > scratch with a bayonet system didn't appeal to me, much as I appreciate
    > their glass-ware.


    And I wouldn't want to have to start again with a DSLR system, for the
    same reason.

    > [Ernie Kovacs]
    >
    > He was doing things in the 1950s that others didn't discover until the
    > 1970s. But there-in lies the problem - he was live and kinescoped,
    > and about the main thing left is early tapes and a very few clapped
    > out kinescopes (I exclude his movies).


    In the book "Seriously Funny," about the "intellectual" humorists of the
    '50s and '60s, it said that about half of his videotapes had been wiped,
    but Edie had bought what remained. I just took out vol. 1 (VHS) of "The
    Best of Ernie Kovacs" from the library, and his book "How to Talk at
    Gin." He also wrote some stuff for MAD magazine that I probably have
    around here somewhere. IIRC, most of his movies were made because the
    IRS had ordered him to take any job available.

    Adam

  20. Re: Broadcasting

    Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >>> and three Japanese SLRs (doesn't
    >>> _everyone_ own an F2?) from the mid-60s to 70s

    >
    > Nope. I still have my Pentax system, with five lenses, extension tubes,
    > extenders, etc.
    >
    > I'm Nikonian with my DSLR, though.


    I'm still using my all-mechanical Canon TX 35mm SLR (bottom of the line
    of which the F-1 was the top), and most of my system is from 1976-1978.
    Three lenses, uncoupled flash, system case, etc. I've gotten really
    comfortable with it. If I see something I want a photo of, I don't have
    to figure out how to use it.

    I'm considering buying a digital point-and-shoot someday, but a
    comparable DSLR system is out of my budget.

    Adam


+ Reply to Thread
Page 12 of 14 FirstFirst ... 2 10 11 12 13 14 LastLast