Dbus Error - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Dbus Error - Mandriva ; Hi All, I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection: org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory The first thing I checked was that the ...

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Thread: Dbus Error

  1. Dbus Error

    Hi All,

    I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I
    am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory

    The first thing I checked was that the folder and file named actually
    do exist; they do. The system continues to boot after the error so it's
    not a show stopper. I have tried looking for answers at Google until my
    eyes are about to bleed. Does anyone know what to do to fix this error
    or at least possibly explain what causes it?



    Thai

  2. Re: Dbus Error

    On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:49:45 -0400, Thai C. Stacy wrote:

    > I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I
    > am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    > org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    > /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory


    Is messagebus set to run at startup? As root, run "chkconfig --list messagebus"
    to find out.

    Again, as root, run "service messagebus restart". Does it generate any error
    messages?

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
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    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  3. Re: Dbus Error

    David W. Hodgins wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:49:45 -0400, Thai C. Stacy wrote:
    >
    >> I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I
    >> am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    >> org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    >> /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory

    >
    > Is messagebus set to run at startup? As root, run "chkconfig --list messagebus"
    > to find out.
    >
    > Again, as root, run "service messagebus restart". Does it generate any error
    > messages?
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >


    Thanks for the response, I get:

    messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff


    then after the next command, I get:

    Stopping system message bus: [ OK ]
    Starting system message bus: [ OK ]

    So it looks like no error messages are generated. Earlier I tried
    various things like changing permissions for the /var/lib/dbus folder
    and the system_bus_socket file inside - no luck. I then removed
    /var/lib/dbus/machine-id /var/run/messagebus.pid and
    /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket. I then rebooted and got the usual no
    such file or directory message. After checking the system, all files
    removed had been replaced. The machine-id file had a new number.

    Actually, I'm a bit interested in what the first command is telling me.
    Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?
    BTW, I can also run dbus-launch and it comes up with an bus_address,
    bus_pid, and bus_windowid which appear to be correct.

    Well, I don't know, it may be some kind of weird start-up problem. I do
    get the error before messagebus starts as a service, or so it appears.



    Thai

  4. Re: Dbus Error

    Thai C. Stacy wrote:

    > [...]
    > messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    >
    > [...]
    > Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?


    Those /numbers,/ as you call them, are your System V /init/ runlevels. Each
    runlevel should be considered a particular system configuration for a
    particular purpose. Different runlevel systems exist across GNU/Linux
    distributions, but the above numbered layout is quite typical for Mandriva,
    RedHat/CentOS/Fedora Core and SuSE, among many others.

    The runlevels are organized as follows...:

    - runlevel 0 = shutdown
    - runlevel 1 = single user (root) maintenance mode
    - runlevel 2 = multiuser mode without internet or LAN networking
    - runlevel 3 = full multiuser mode
    - runlevel 4 = full multiuser mode
    - runlevel 5 = full multiuser mode with GUI login on virtual console 7
    - runlevel 6 = reboot

    The default runlevel for RedHat, CentOS, Fedora Core and Mandriva is either
    3 or 5. Runlevel 4 is typically unused in the above distributions - in
    SuSE, it was traditionally the full multiuser mode with the GUI login, but
    I don't know whether this is still the case.

    Nevertheless, runlevel 4 is available as an extra runlevel for instant
    redeployment of the system in another configuration. For instance, you
    could have runlevel 4 configured as an Apache/MySQL/PHP server, and by
    switching runlevels from either 3 or 5 to 4 you could then instantly switch
    between using your system as a workstation or using it as the described
    LAMP server.

    The default runlevel depends on what is said in */etc/inittab.* If you look
    at the contents of the file, you will see a line that says either...

    id:3:initdefault:

    .... or...

    id:5:initdefault:

    .... which sets the default runlevel respectively to be either 3 or 5.

    Runlevel configuration is done by populating the */etc/rc.d/rc[#]*
    directories - with "[#]" being a number from 0 to 6 - with symbolic links,
    pointing to scripts in */etc/rc.d/init.d* - */etc/init.d* is a symbolic
    link to that directory.

    The scripts in */etc/rc.d/init.d* are capable of accepting commandline
    switches in order to start them or stop the daemon or service they
    represent, and often also to query their current status and/or clear their
    settings - e.g. the /shorewall/ script.

    The symbolic links calling upon those scripts have a name that starts with
    either a "K" or an "S", typically followed by a two-digit number and the
    name of the script they point to. The symlinks whose name begins with a
    "K" (for KILL) stop the pertaining service, while those whose name begins
    with an "S" (for START) will start the daemon or service.

    This is quite a handy technique, given that the scripts in each runlevel are
    executed by the System V /init/ system in alphanumerical order. In other
    words, the "K-" scripts will run first, in the order of the two-digit
    number in their name, and then the "S-" scripts will run, again in the
    order of the two-digit number in their name.

    You should not manually try to change the runlevel configuration by moving
    symlinks around, changing their name and/or creating/deleting them, unless
    you absolutely know what you're doing. There are other tools for
    organizing your runlevels, such as /KSysV/ in KDE, /tksysv/ or /chkconfig/
    from a commandline.

    And so, all of the above in mind, the output line you pasted from
    the /chkconfig/ command David gave you shows you that the /messagebus/
    script is set to start the service in runlevels 2, 3, 4 and 5, but not in
    runlevels 0 (shutdown), 1 (single user maintenance mode) and 6 (reboot).

    Did we learn anything here today, grasshopper?

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  5. Re: Dbus Error

    On Fri, 16 May 2008 15:37:42 -0400, Thai C. Stacy wrote:

    > Thanks for the response, I get:
    > messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    > Actually, I'm a bit interested in what the first command is telling me.
    > Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?


    They correspond to the various run levels. Run level 3 starts the system
    with a console login prompt. Run level 5 starts the display manager.
    See "man init" for more details.

    > Well, I don't know, it may be some kind of weird start-up problem. I do
    > get the error before messagebus starts as a service, or so it appears.


    Most likely cause, given that messagebus is starting ok, is that some other
    service is trying to use the bus before messagebus has started. Does
    /var/log/prcsys.log have anything to indicate which service the error is
    coming from?

    It may help to add "nopinit" as a kernel option, so that the services will
    start based on the order determined by chkconfig, instead of using parallel
    processing. If the problem still exists with that option, at least there
    will only be one service starting at a time, so the order of the messages
    should make it clearer, which service is getting the error.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  6. Re: Dbus Error

    Thai C. Stacy wrote:

    > David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >> On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:49:45 -0400, Thai C. Stacy
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I
    >>> am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    >>> org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    >>> /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory

    >>
    >> Is messagebus set to run at startup? As root, run "chkconfig --list
    >> messagebus" to find out.
    >>
    >> Again, as root, run "service messagebus restart". Does it generate any
    >> error messages?
    >>
    >> Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the response, I get:
    >
    > messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    >
    >
    > then after the next command, I get:
    >
    > Stopping system message bus: [ OK ]
    > Starting system message bus: [ OK ]
    >
    > So it looks like no error messages are generated. Earlier I tried
    > various things like changing permissions for the /var/lib/dbus folder
    > and the system_bus_socket file inside - no luck. I then removed
    > /var/lib/dbus/machine-id /var/run/messagebus.pid and
    > /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket. I then rebooted and got the usual no
    > such file or directory message. After checking the system, all files
    > removed had been replaced. The machine-id file had a new number.
    >
    > Actually, I'm a bit interested in what the first command is telling me.
    > Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?
    > BTW, I can also run dbus-launch and it comes up with an bus_address,
    > bus_pid, and bus_windowid which appear to be correct.
    >
    > Well, I don't know, it may be some kind of weird start-up problem. I do
    > get the error before messagebus starts as a service, or so it appears.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thai


    I am running KDE, and I find that only GNOME apps (mainly totem) complain
    about DBus errors. I continue anyway. Everything still works.

    Doug.

  7. Re: Dbus Error

    Aragorn wrote:
    > Thai C. Stacy wrote:
    >
    >> [...]
    >> messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    >>
    >> [...]
    >> Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?

    >
    > Those /numbers,/ as you call them, are your System V /init/ runlevels. Each
    > runlevel should be considered a particular system configuration for a
    > particular purpose. Different runlevel systems exist across GNU/Linux
    > distributions, but the above numbered layout is quite typical for Mandriva,
    > RedHat/CentOS/Fedora Core and SuSE, among many others.
    >
    > The runlevels are organized as follows...:
    >
    > - runlevel 0 = shutdown
    > - runlevel 1 = single user (root) maintenance mode
    > - runlevel 2 = multiuser mode without internet or LAN networking
    > - runlevel 3 = full multiuser mode
    > - runlevel 4 = full multiuser mode
    > - runlevel 5 = full multiuser mode with GUI login on virtual console 7
    > - runlevel 6 = reboot
    >
    > The default runlevel for RedHat, CentOS, Fedora Core and Mandriva is either
    > 3 or 5. Runlevel 4 is typically unused in the above distributions - in
    > SuSE, it was traditionally the full multiuser mode with the GUI login, but
    > I don't know whether this is still the case.
    >
    > Nevertheless, runlevel 4 is available as an extra runlevel for instant
    > redeployment of the system in another configuration. For instance, you
    > could have runlevel 4 configured as an Apache/MySQL/PHP server, and by
    > switching runlevels from either 3 or 5 to 4 you could then instantly switch
    > between using your system as a workstation or using it as the described
    > LAMP server.
    >
    > The default runlevel depends on what is said in */etc/inittab.* If you look
    > at the contents of the file, you will see a line that says either...
    >
    > id:3:initdefault:
    >
    > ... or...
    >
    > id:5:initdefault:
    >
    > ... which sets the default runlevel respectively to be either 3 or 5.
    >
    > Runlevel configuration is done by populating the */etc/rc.d/rc[#]*
    > directories - with "[#]" being a number from 0 to 6 - with symbolic links,
    > pointing to scripts in */etc/rc.d/init.d* - */etc/init.d* is a symbolic
    > link to that directory.
    >
    > The scripts in */etc/rc.d/init.d* are capable of accepting commandline
    > switches in order to start them or stop the daemon or service they
    > represent, and often also to query their current status and/or clear their
    > settings - e.g. the /shorewall/ script.
    >
    > The symbolic links calling upon those scripts have a name that starts with
    > either a "K" or an "S", typically followed by a two-digit number and the
    > name of the script they point to. The symlinks whose name begins with a
    > "K" (for KILL) stop the pertaining service, while those whose name begins
    > with an "S" (for START) will start the daemon or service.
    >
    > This is quite a handy technique, given that the scripts in each runlevel are
    > executed by the System V /init/ system in alphanumerical order. In other
    > words, the "K-" scripts will run first, in the order of the two-digit
    > number in their name, and then the "S-" scripts will run, again in the
    > order of the two-digit number in their name.
    >
    > You should not manually try to change the runlevel configuration by moving
    > symlinks around, changing their name and/or creating/deleting them, unless
    > you absolutely know what you're doing. There are other tools for
    > organizing your runlevels, such as /KSysV/ in KDE, /tksysv/ or /chkconfig/
    > from a commandline.
    >
    > And so, all of the above in mind, the output line you pasted from
    > the /chkconfig/ command David gave you shows you that the /messagebus/
    > script is set to start the service in runlevels 2, 3, 4 and 5, but not in
    > runlevels 0 (shutdown), 1 (single user maintenance mode) and 6 (reboot).
    >
    > Did we learn anything here today, grasshopper?
    >

    I guess, thanks. I hope that means it's set correctly.



    Thai

  8. Re: Dbus Error

    David W. Hodgins wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 May 2008 15:37:42 -0400, Thai C. Stacy wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for the response, I get:
    >> messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    >> Actually, I'm a bit interested in what the first command is telling me.
    >> Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?

    >
    > They correspond to the various run levels. Run level 3 starts the system
    > with a console login prompt. Run level 5 starts the display manager.
    > See "man init" for more details.
    >
    >> Well, I don't know, it may be some kind of weird start-up problem. I do
    >> get the error before messagebus starts as a service, or so it appears.

    >
    > Most likely cause, given that messagebus is starting ok, is that some other
    > service is trying to use the bus before messagebus has started. Does
    > /var/log/prcsys.log have anything to indicate which service the error is
    > coming from?
    >
    > It may help to add "nopinit" as a kernel option, so that the services will
    > start based on the order determined by chkconfig, instead of using parallel
    > processing. If the problem still exists with that option, at least there
    > will only be one service starting at a time, so the order of the messages
    > should make it clearer, which service is getting the error.
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >


    Thank you, that was most helpful. Messagebus does start normally after
    the error.

    error: libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory is what the
    log file reads. Lower down it says Starting system message bus:
    [ OK ]

    I will check out the kernel option idea. Everyone in this newsgroup is
    so nice.



    Thai

  9. Re: Dbus Error

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    > Thai C. Stacy wrote:
    >
    >> David W. Hodgins wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 16 May 2008 10:49:45 -0400, Thai C. Stacy
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm currently running the 2008.1 Spring Edition of Mandriva. At boot I
    >>>> am getting this error libhal_ctx_set_dbus_connection:
    >>>> org.freedesktop.DBUS.Error. FileNotFound: Failed to connect to socket
    >>>> /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory
    >>> Is messagebus set to run at startup? As root, run "chkconfig --list
    >>> messagebus" to find out.
    >>>
    >>> Again, as root, run "service messagebus restart". Does it generate any
    >>> error messages?
    >>>
    >>> Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >>>

    >> Thanks for the response, I get:
    >>
    >> messagebus 0ff 1ff 2n 3n 4n 5n 6ff
    >>
    >>
    >> then after the next command, I get:
    >>
    >> Stopping system message bus: [ OK ]
    >> Starting system message bus: [ OK ]
    >>
    >> So it looks like no error messages are generated. Earlier I tried
    >> various things like changing permissions for the /var/lib/dbus folder
    >> and the system_bus_socket file inside - no luck. I then removed
    >> /var/lib/dbus/machine-id /var/run/messagebus.pid and
    >> /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket. I then rebooted and got the usual no
    >> such file or directory message. After checking the system, all files
    >> removed had been replaced. The machine-id file had a new number.
    >>
    >> Actually, I'm a bit interested in what the first command is telling me.
    >> Why are some of the listed numbers for messagebus on and others are off?
    >> BTW, I can also run dbus-launch and it comes up with an bus_address,
    >> bus_pid, and bus_windowid which appear to be correct.
    >>
    >> Well, I don't know, it may be some kind of weird start-up problem. I do
    >> get the error before messagebus starts as a service, or so it appears.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Thai

    >
    > I am running KDE, and I find that only GNOME apps (mainly totem) complain
    > about DBus errors. I continue anyway. Everything still works.
    >
    > Doug.


    Thanks, I am running KDE primarily as well. Things do seem to be working
    well so for the time being, I won't worry about this particular error
    too much. I am still learning a lot about Linux every day.



    Thai

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