NVidia driver not installed - Mandriva

This is a discussion on NVidia driver not installed - Mandriva ; I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker installation to Official. My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was successful after rebooting the first time. Now, I have updated my kernel to ...

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  1. NVidia driver not installed

    I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker
    installation to Official.

    My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was
    successful after rebooting the first time.

    Now, I have updated my kernel to the latest, and although I ran XFdrake,
    apparently successfully, the nvidia.ko module was not created. I didn't
    see dkms run, and suspect that it didn't.

    On the bootup messages, I see that the relevant dkms.conf is not set to run
    automatically. The problem is that for each set (2 versions of nvidia +
    virtualbox,) there are about 4 files called dkms.conf.

    (a) Can I set dkms to run during bootup? (Something like that used to happen
    under previous releases.)
    (b) If so, which file should I edit? Or all for the relevant nvidia
    version?

    I know that a lot think that it is better to use NVidia's own package, but I
    prefer to let the computer do what it thinks best.

    Thanks,

    Doug.

  2. Re: NVidia driver not installed

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    > I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker
    > installation to Official.
    >
    > My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was
    > successful after rebooting the first time.
    >
    > Now, I have updated my kernel to the latest, and although I ran XFdrake,
    > apparently successfully, the nvidia.ko module was not created. I didn't
    > see dkms run, and suspect that it didn't.
    >
    > On the bootup messages, I see that the relevant dkms.conf is not set to run
    > automatically. The problem is that for each set (2 versions of nvidia +
    > virtualbox,) there are about 4 files called dkms.conf.
    >
    > (a) Can I set dkms to run during bootup? (Something like that used to happen
    > under previous releases.)
    > (b) If so, which file should I edit? Or all for the relevant nvidia
    > version?


    Load mcc, go to system, and there to services. Set dkms to run
    at boot.

    In addition to dkms being installed, you will need
    dkms-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1 or something similar,

    I think the next two are installed automatically.
    lib64kwinnvidiahack4-4.0.3-1mdv2008.1
    x11-driver-video-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1

    Plus, you must have the kernel devel package for
    your _exact_ kernel. This will be something similar to,
    kernel-desktop-devel-2.6.24.3-4mnb-1-1mnb1

    Then reboot. If dkms builds you a proprietary nvidia
    module, it will be nvidia.ko and must be entered as nvidia
    in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. If it builds you the reverse
    engineered module, it will be nv.ko and must be entered
    as nv in xorg.conf. If you get the nv.ko module, you
    may need to get the nvidia package from plf (though I think
    it is now included in the regular Mandriva package).

    If you have done all the above and still no joy, run
    XFdrake again and see what happens.

    Cheers!

    jim b.


    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  3. Re: NVidia driver not installed

    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    >> I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker
    >> installation to Official.
    >>
    >> My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was
    >> successful after rebooting the first time.
    >>
    >> Now, I have updated my kernel to the latest, and although I ran XFdrake,
    >> apparently successfully, the nvidia.ko module was not created. I didn't
    >> see dkms run, and suspect that it didn't.
    >>
    >> On the bootup messages, I see that the relevant dkms.conf is not set to
    >> run
    >> automatically. The problem is that for each set (2 versions of nvidia +
    >> virtualbox,) there are about 4 files called dkms.conf.
    >>
    >> (a) Can I set dkms to run during bootup? (Something like that used to
    >> happen under previous releases.)
    >> (b) If so, which file should I edit? Or all for the relevant nvidia
    >> version?

    >
    > Load mcc, go to system, and there to services. Set dkms to run
    > at boot.
    >
    > In addition to dkms being installed, you will need
    > dkms-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1 or something similar,
    >
    > I think the next two are installed automatically.
    > lib64kwinnvidiahack4-4.0.3-1mdv2008.1
    > x11-driver-video-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1
    >
    > Plus, you must have the kernel devel package for
    > your _exact_ kernel. This will be something similar to,
    > kernel-desktop-devel-2.6.24.3-4mnb-1-1mnb1
    >
    > Then reboot. If dkms builds you a proprietary nvidia
    > module, it will be nvidia.ko and must be entered as nvidia
    > in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. If it builds you the reverse
    > engineered module, it will be nv.ko and must be entered
    > as nv in xorg.conf. If you get the nv.ko module, you
    > may need to get the nvidia package from plf (though I think
    > it is now included in the regular Mandriva package).
    >
    > If you have done all the above and still no joy, run
    > XFdrake again and see what happens.
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >
    >

    Thanks Jim. It looks for nvidia.ko, which is missing. dkms is already set
    to run on boot, but fails, because for everything it handles, "AUTOINSTALL
    is not set in its dkms.conf" (except for nvidia on the previous kernel,
    which gives "already installed on this kernel.") The relevant line seems
    to be AUTOINSTALL="yes"

    At least I know where to start looking.

    BTW, just out of interest, what is the significance of the "mnb" suffix on RPMs?

    Doug.


  4. Re: NVidia driver not installed - SOLVED (kinda)

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:

    > Jim Beard wrote:
    >
    >> Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    >>> I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker
    >>> installation to Official.
    >>>
    >>> My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was
    >>> successful after rebooting the first time.
    >>>
    >>> Now, I have updated my kernel to the latest, and although I ran XFdrake,
    >>> apparently successfully, the nvidia.ko module was not created. I didn't
    >>> see dkms run, and suspect that it didn't.
    >>>
    >>> On the bootup messages, I see that the relevant dkms.conf is not set to
    >>> run
    >>> automatically. The problem is that for each set (2 versions of nvidia +
    >>> virtualbox,) there are about 4 files called dkms.conf.
    >>>
    >>> (a) Can I set dkms to run during bootup? (Something like that used to
    >>> happen under previous releases.)
    >>> (b) If so, which file should I edit? Or all for the relevant nvidia
    >>> version?

    >>
    >> Load mcc, go to system, and there to services. Set dkms to run
    >> at boot.
    >>
    >> In addition to dkms being installed, you will need
    >> dkms-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1 or something similar,
    >>
    >> I think the next two are installed automatically.
    >> lib64kwinnvidiahack4-4.0.3-1mdv2008.1
    >> x11-driver-video-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1
    >>
    >> Plus, you must have the kernel devel package for
    >> your _exact_ kernel. This will be something similar to,
    >> kernel-desktop-devel-2.6.24.3-4mnb-1-1mnb1
    >>
    >> Then reboot. If dkms builds you a proprietary nvidia
    >> module, it will be nvidia.ko and must be entered as nvidia
    >> in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. If it builds you the reverse
    >> engineered module, it will be nv.ko and must be entered
    >> as nv in xorg.conf. If you get the nv.ko module, you
    >> may need to get the nvidia package from plf (though I think
    >> it is now included in the regular Mandriva package).
    >>
    >> If you have done all the above and still no joy, run
    >> XFdrake again and see what happens.
    >>
    >> Cheers!
    >>
    >> jim b.
    >>
    >>

    > Thanks Jim. It looks for nvidia.ko, which is missing. dkms is already
    > set to run on boot, but fails, because for everything it handles,
    > "AUTOINSTALL is not set in its dkms.conf" (except for nvidia on the
    > previous kernel,
    > which gives "already installed on this kernel.") The relevant line seems
    > to be AUTOINSTALL="yes"
    >
    > At least I know where to start looking.
    >
    > BTW, just out of interest, what is the significance of the "mnb" suffix on
    > RPMs?
    >
    > Doug.


    I uninstalled the previous kernel, and everything came out right. Seems as
    though there can't be two modules at once, although they are in different
    directories.

    Doug.


  5. Re: NVidia driver not installed - SOLVED (kinda)

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:

    > I uninstalled the previous kernel, and everything came out right. Seems
    > as though there can't be two modules at once, although they are in
    > different directories.


    While your post on this matter has left me wondering, your last report on
    the matter now just made me realize...

    See, part the proprietary nVidia driver package must be built against your
    kernel - which should normally not require any rebuilds of the driver if
    you only update your kernel to a later patchlevel, as opposed to using a
    different kernel version - but the driver itself is binary.

    So what you're building is actually just the code that interfaces the evil
    proprietary driver with the kernel, which is important in the event of e.g.
    an SMP system versus a single-CPU system.

    So my guess is that this piece of code that must be built against your
    kernel is expecting a different kernel from the (newer) one you're using
    and thus has trouble finding either the driver itself - e.g. because a
    symlink would point to the wrong directory - or that it has problems
    interfacing with the kernel it wasn't built against.

    It's somewhat of an educated guess, because I haven't looked into the
    loading mechanisms for these proprietary drivers yet. I suppose this is
    something that would be handled by the /dkms/ package, but that's not
    something I've looked into yet.

    Despite the fact that this machine here uses an old all-stock Mandrake 10.0
    - the sole exception being that I installed a later version of the Flash
    plugins - I normally build my own kernels and I configure everything I need
    to be inline with the kernel code itself rather than as modules.
    Proprietary drivers are always modular, but then again I don't upgrade my
    kernel often, so it's quite possible to have the binary driver module load
    without /dkms./

    Anyway, this was a totally useless post. The only use in it perhaps for
    you is that you may now have a marginally slightly better clue as to why
    you couldn't have two modules co-existing.

    I'm not a guru. I just look like one. p

    --
    Aragorn
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  6. Re: NVidia driver not installed - SOLVED (kinda)

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    > Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    >
    >> Jim Beard wrote:
    >>
    >>> Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    >>>> I downloaded the Dual 1586/x64 CD and successfully upgraded my Cooker
    >>>> installation to Official.
    >>>>
    >>>> My NVidia card was not detected on running the installer, but I was
    >>>> successful after rebooting the first time.
    >>>>
    >>>> Now, I have updated my kernel to the latest, and although I ran XFdrake,
    >>>> apparently successfully, the nvidia.ko module was not created. I didn't
    >>>> see dkms run, and suspect that it didn't.
    >>>>
    >>>> On the bootup messages, I see that the relevant dkms.conf is not set to
    >>>> run
    >>>> automatically. The problem is that for each set (2 versions of nvidia +
    >>>> virtualbox,) there are about 4 files called dkms.conf.
    >>>>
    >>>> (a) Can I set dkms to run during bootup? (Something like that used to
    >>>> happen under previous releases.)
    >>>> (b) If so, which file should I edit? Or all for the relevant nvidia
    >>>> version?
    >>> Load mcc, go to system, and there to services. Set dkms to run
    >>> at boot.
    >>>
    >>> In addition to dkms being installed, you will need
    >>> dkms-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1 or something similar,
    >>>
    >>> I think the next two are installed automatically.
    >>> lib64kwinnvidiahack4-4.0.3-1mdv2008.1
    >>> x11-driver-video-nvidia-current-169.12-4mdv2008.1
    >>>
    >>> Plus, you must have the kernel devel package for
    >>> your _exact_ kernel. This will be something similar to,
    >>> kernel-desktop-devel-2.6.24.3-4mnb-1-1mnb1
    >>>
    >>> Then reboot. If dkms builds you a proprietary nvidia
    >>> module, it will be nvidia.ko and must be entered as nvidia
    >>> in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. If it builds you the reverse
    >>> engineered module, it will be nv.ko and must be entered
    >>> as nv in xorg.conf. If you get the nv.ko module, you
    >>> may need to get the nvidia package from plf (though I think
    >>> it is now included in the regular Mandriva package).
    >>>
    >>> If you have done all the above and still no joy, run
    >>> XFdrake again and see what happens.
    >>>
    >>> Cheers!
    >>>
    >>> jim b.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Thanks Jim. It looks for nvidia.ko, which is missing. dkms is already
    >> set to run on boot, but fails, because for everything it handles,
    >> "AUTOINSTALL is not set in its dkms.conf" (except for nvidia on the
    >> previous kernel,
    >> which gives "already installed on this kernel.") The relevant line seems
    >> to be AUTOINSTALL="yes"
    >>
    >> At least I know where to start looking.
    >>
    >> BTW, just out of interest, what is the significance of the "mnb" suffix on
    >> RPMs?
    >>
    >> Doug.

    >
    > I uninstalled the previous kernel, and everything came out right. Seems as
    > though there can't be two modules at once, although they are in different
    > directories.


    First, I have no clue what mnb stands for. The new multimedia
    kernels are tmb, but I do not know hat that stands for either.

    Glad everything is now working. Contrary to your belief, it is
    possible to have two modules, each in its own module tree under
    /lib/modules for the specific kernel it works with.

    The proprietary nVidia modules are very tightly intergrated into the
    kernel. Not only must one built for a recent kernel (that does not
    yet have a nVidia binary version in stock) be built using the devel
    files for that exact kernel (and that must be the one running, unless
    you use arguments to the nvidia installer to tell it otherwise), the
    compiler used for the kernel and the module must be the same. And
    to make sure everything matches, names are checked in
    /usr/src/*kernelname*/.config and maybe a place or two elsewhere. If
    anything does not match up properly, the installer aborts.

    My solution: As soon as I download and install a new kernel, I make
    sure the new devel package is installed, and reboot to allow dkms to
    build the new driver before anything changes. Only after that is
    done do I tinker with anything that might confuse the nVidia
    installer.

    Cheers!

    jim b.


    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  7. Re: NVidia driver not installed - SOLVED (kinda)

    Aragorn wrote:

    > Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    >
    >> I uninstalled the previous kernel, and everything came out right. Seems
    >> as though there can't be two modules at once, although they are in
    >> different directories.

    >
    > While your post on this matter has left me wondering, your last report on
    > the matter now just made me realize...
    >
    > See, part the proprietary nVidia driver package must be built against your
    > kernel - which should normally not require any rebuilds of the driver if
    > you only update your kernel to a later patchlevel, as opposed to using a
    > different kernel version - but the driver itself is binary.
    >
    > So what you're building is actually just the code that interfaces the evil
    > proprietary driver with the kernel, which is important in the event of
    > e.g. an SMP system versus a single-CPU system.
    >
    > So my guess is that this piece of code that must be built against your
    > kernel is expecting a different kernel from the (newer) one you're using
    > and thus has trouble finding either the driver itself - e.g. because a
    > symlink would point to the wrong directory - or that it has problems
    > interfacing with the kernel it wasn't built against.
    >
    > It's somewhat of an educated guess, because I haven't looked into the
    > loading mechanisms for these proprietary drivers yet. I suppose this is
    > something that would be handled by the /dkms/ package, but that's not
    > something I've looked into yet.
    >
    > Despite the fact that this machine here uses an old all-stock Mandrake
    > 10.0 - the sole exception being that I installed a later version of the
    > Flash plugins - I normally build my own kernels and I configure everything
    > I need to be inline with the kernel code itself rather than as modules.
    > Proprietary drivers are always modular, but then again I don't upgrade my
    > kernel often, so it's quite possible to have the binary driver module load
    > without /dkms./
    >
    > Anyway, this was a totally useless post. The only use in it perhaps
    > for you is that you may now have a marginally slightly better clue as to
    > why you couldn't have two modules co-existing.
    >
    > I'm not a guru. I just look like one. p
    >

    Thanks, that is probably the reason. I don't understand it fully, but there
    seems to be only one dkms-nvidia directory tree, distinct from the kernel
    modules. I had assumed that the tree would be under
    kernel/modules/3rdparty or similar, and one could exist for each kernel.
    Apparently, not so. For some reason, there were two versions of the driver
    installed, side by side. That must have come from the RPMs.

    I had discovered that it was impossible to install NVidia's own package
    alongside Mandriva's, but that didn't surprise me.

    Doug.

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