Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem - Mandriva ; Hi all, I've done some Googling but so far to no avail, so perhaps someone might be able to help me here. The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile broadband service which uses the ...

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Thread: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

  1. Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem


    Hi all,

    I've done some Googling but so far to no avail, so perhaps someone might be
    able to help me here.

    The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.

    The device mounts as a flash drive from which you can download drivers for
    Win and Mac, and once the drivers are loaded the device 'becomes' a
    broadband modem.

    Obviously, I would love to be able to use this beastie with my Mandriva
    2008.0 setup. So, are there drivers out there yet for this device, and if
    so, please point me in the right direction!

    Many thanks,
    Keith Willis

  2. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    Keith wrote:

    >
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I've done some Googling but so far to no avail, so perhaps someone might
    > be able to help me here.
    >
    > The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    > broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.
    >
    > The device mounts as a flash drive from which you can download drivers for
    > Win and Mac, and once the drivers are loaded the device 'becomes' a
    > broadband modem.


    From this point of view, the device will then simply register as a USB
    storage device.

    > Obviously, I would love to be able to use this beastie with my Mandriva
    > 2008.0 setup. So, are there drivers out there yet for this device, and if
    > so, please point me in the right direction!


    I personally dislike USB as a network connection; in my humble opinion,
    you'd be far better off with a regular 10/100 Ethernet connection.

    Either way, it surprises me that this device would require any special
    drivers - well, in this day and age, it actually doesn't surprise me at
    all, but it's still unusual.

    I myself am on cable internet, and I do not require any drivers for my cable
    modem. Likewise, friends of mine who have an ADSL connection do not
    require any drivers for their modems. Such devices are normally
    self-contained and should work equally well when connected to a single
    computer directly or to a whole local area network via a switch, hub or
    router. At least, that's how it should be, and for most broadband modems I
    know of, this is true.

    You _*do*_ on the other hand need drivers for a network connection, but
    those are just for the generic network layer - e.g. you will need TCP/IP
    support, you'll probably also want packet filtering, et al - and for the
    network interface type. For instance, if you have an Ethernet connection
    to your broadband modem, you will need a driver to support your NIC, and if
    it's a USB connection, you will need a driver for Ethernet over USB. If
    the device uses wireless Ethernet to connect to the internet, you will most
    likely also need drivers for the most common encryption protocols - unless
    you want your next door neighbor making use of your internet connection or
    snooping files off your network. ;-)

    The good news however is that most of those drivers are all part of the
    stock Linux kernel and are loaded into memory upon boottime as needed.
    Mandriva Linux has very good hardware detection, and generic things like
    networking support over Ethernet or USB are already either compiled
    statically into the kernel or available as loadable kernel modules, most of
    which are loaded into the kernel at boot time, either by the kernel itself,
    by the driver module configuration files or by the /initrd/ or /initramfs/
    that ships with the distribution.

    On the other hand, it is not entirely impossible that this device was so
    ingeniously - read "diabolically" - crafted that it's only usable as a
    generic USB/flash storage device without some proprietary driver from the
    vendor - in this case, the ISP - that magically engages the device's
    network connection to the internet. If this is the case for this device -
    I do not know this device, so I cannot give you an exclusive opinion on it
    - then you are better off not pursuing this idea.

    Proprietary stuff is a pest, even if only from the usability and reliability
    point of view - it makes you dependent of the goodwill of one particular
    vendor to keep supporting their product for as long as the customer intends
    to use it - but it's particularly a pest with regard to GNU/Linux and FOSS
    in general.

    Most of the time, there will only be drivers for the two proprietary and
    commercial operating system platforms - i.e. Microsoft Windows (in various
    forms) and Apple OS X (in various forms) - and even if they do supply the
    enduser with drivers for the Linux kernel, then those drivers will be
    non-free and binary-only, which means that they will contain bugs that only
    the hardware manufacturers themselves can fix, if they even _want_ to
    commit resources to fixing them in the first place. It would even be
    illegal for you to, if you have the skills, reverse-engineer them and fix
    their bugs for your own usage.

    The bottom line is that you better check with the ISP in question as to
    whether this device supports anything other than Windows or OS X. :-/ But
    either way, I would advise a broadband modem that uses regular Ethernet to
    connect to your computer/switch/router instead of one that uses USB.

    Just my two cents worth... ;-)

    --
    Aragorn
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  3. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 17:28:25 +0200, Aragorn wrote:

    >> The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    >> broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.
    >>
    >> The device mounts as a flash drive from which you can download drivers
    >> for Win and Mac, and once the drivers are loaded the device 'becomes' a
    >> broadband modem.

    >
    > From this point of view, the device will then simply register as a USB
    > storage device.
    >
    >> Obviously, I would love to be able to use this beastie with my Mandriva
    >> 2008.0 setup. So, are there drivers out there yet for this device, and
    >> if so, please point me in the right direction!

    >
    > I personally dislike USB as a network connection; in my humble opinion,
    > you'd be far better off with a regular 10/100 Ethernet connection.


    It can be tough to connect a cat5 cable to a 3G network, the packets tend
    to decay soon after they fall out the end of the cable instead of
    propagating to the base station. Or something.

    (Hint: 3G is mobile radio.)

  4. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    marksouth wrote:

    > On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 17:28:25 +0200, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >>> The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    >>> broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.
    >>>
    >>> The device mounts as a flash drive from which you can download drivers
    >>> for Win and Mac, and once the drivers are loaded the device 'becomes' a
    >>> broadband modem.

    >>
    >> From this point of view, the device will then simply register as a USB
    >> storage device.
    >>
    >>> Obviously, I would love to be able to use this beastie with my Mandriva
    >>> 2008.0 setup. So, are there drivers out there yet for this device, and
    >>> if so, please point me in the right direction!

    >>
    >> I personally dislike USB as a network connection; in my humble opinion,
    >> you'd be far better off with a regular 10/100 Ethernet connection.

    >
    > It can be tough to connect a cat5 cable to a 3G network, the packets tend
    > to decay soon after they fall out the end of the cable instead of
    > propagating to the base station. Or something.
    >
    > (Hint: 3G is mobile radio.)


    Maybe I misunderstood then, but I was under the impression that you'd
    connect your computer to the base station via Ethernet (or USB) and let the
    base station do the translation from Ethernet packets into radio
    waves... :-/

    --
    Aragorn
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  5. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 06:56:45 -0400, Keith wrote:

    > The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    > broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.


    Take a look at http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=736977 starting
    with the reply that starts with "Here's my messy guide".

    While written for Ubuntu, the instructions look like they may work
    with Mandriva.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  6. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 06:56:45 -0400, Keith wrote:
    >> The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    >> broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.

    >
    > Take a look at http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=736977 starting
    > with the reply that starts with "Here's my messy guide".
    >
    > While written for Ubuntu, the instructions look like they may work
    > with Mandriva.


    I'll give that a go and report back. Thanks for the link!

  7. Re: Orange Option ICON 225 USB broadband modem

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 01:25:50 +0200, Aragorn wrote:

    > marksouth wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 17:28:25 +0200, Aragorn wrote:
    >>
    >>>> The mobile network provider Orange here in the UK offer a 3g mobile
    >>>> broadband service which uses the USB device mentioned in the subject.
    >>>>
    >>>> The device mounts as a flash drive from which you can download
    >>>> drivers for Win and Mac, and once the drivers are loaded the device
    >>>> 'becomes' a broadband modem.
    >>>
    >>> From this point of view, the device will then simply register as a USB
    >>> storage device.
    >>>
    >>>> Obviously, I would love to be able to use this beastie with my
    >>>> Mandriva 2008.0 setup. So, are there drivers out there yet for this
    >>>> device, and if so, please point me in the right direction!
    >>>
    >>> I personally dislike USB as a network connection; in my humble
    >>> opinion, you'd be far better off with a regular 10/100 Ethernet
    >>> connection.

    >>
    >> It can be tough to connect a cat5 cable to a 3G network, the packets
    >> tend to decay soon after they fall out the end of the cable instead of
    >> propagating to the base station. Or something.
    >>
    >> (Hint: 3G is mobile radio.)

    >
    > Maybe I misunderstood then, but I was under the impression that you'd
    > connect your computer to the base station via Ethernet (or USB) and let
    > the base station do the translation from Ethernet packets into radio
    > waves... :-/


    It's a USB device, like a USB 802.11 stick. One could fit up a plain
    ethercable interface, but that just adds an interface, and makes the
    device more expensive, more bulky, and more power hungry, plus as it is
    it can be powered directly via USB. Given that the OP probably got it
    free with a service subscription as well, I think he really does want to
    get that USB device to work.

    Sorry to be a killjoy.

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