I give up. - Mandriva

This is a discussion on I give up. - Mandriva ; On 15 avr, 18:24, Aragorn wrote: > Roger wrote: > > Aragorn skrev: > > >> Muchas grašias, merci beaucoup, vielen dank, hartelijk bedankt, grazi, > >> domo arregato, oh, and thanks a lot as well... > > > And ...

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Thread: I give up.

  1. Re: I give up.

    On 15 avr, 18:24, Aragorn wrote:
    > Roger wrote:
    > > Aragorn skrev:

    >
    > >> Muchas grašias, merci beaucoup, vielen dank, hartelijk bedankt, grazi,
    > >> domo arregato, oh, and thanks a lot as well...

    >
    > > And "takk" in Norwegian (Thankyou) =0)

    >
    > Indeed! I knew I had forgotten something. I know "takk" because we have a
    > couple of Norwegians on our IRC network. They've also explained to me what
    > "karsk" is, and how they always get themselves into trouble after consuming
    > it.
    >
    > One of the anecdotes here is that I told that one guy that I too spoke
    > Norwegian, just when he was drunk on karsk again, and he told me "Oh yeah?
    > Same something in Norwegian". So I spoke the only Norwegian sentence I
    > knew (while knowing what it means): "Fil ikke funnet". ;-)
    >


    Is Norwegian a germanistic kind of language ? Danish is sort of imho,
    like English, because angle-saxon cames from Angel & Saxen, in
    Germany. German shares many words with polish too, - or word roots,
    like for dziekuje (thanks), where one can clearly hear a form of
    "danke".

    Anyway, Tak in polish means Yes...

    L

  2. Re: I give up.

    lisztnet@aliceadsl.fr wrote:

    > On 15 avr, 18:24, Aragorn wrote:
    >> Roger wrote:
    >> > Aragorn skrev:

    >>
    >> >> Muchas gra├žias, merci beaucoup, vielen dank, hartelijk bedankt, grazi,
    >> >> domo arregato, oh, and thanks a lot as well...

    >>
    >> > And "takk" in Norwegian (Thankyou) =0)

    >>
    >> Indeed! I knew I had forgotten something. I know "takk" because we have
    >> a couple of Norwegians on our IRC network. They've also explained to me
    >> what "karsk" is, and how they always get themselves into trouble after
    >> consuming it.
    >>
    >> One of the anecdotes here is that I told that one guy that I too spoke
    >> Norwegian, just when he was drunk on karsk again, and he told me "Oh
    >> yeah? Same something in Norwegian". So I spoke the only Norwegian
    >> sentence I knew (while knowing what it means): "Fil ikke funnet". ;-)

    >
    > Is Norwegian a germanistic kind of language ?


    Yes, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Finnish are all Germanic languages.
    Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland are all also covered under the common
    denominator "Scandinavia", and so their respective languages, although
    still quite different, bear a lot of resemblance. ;-)

    > Danish is sort of imho, like English, because angle-saxon cames from
    > Angel & Saxen, in Germany.


    While this is true, and the Northern European languages are basically
    Germanic and the Southern European languages are basically Classical - i.e.
    based upon Latin and Ancient Greek - the European languages have all become
    intermixed a great deal over the centuries.

    If you look at modern-day English and modern-day French for instance - i.e.
    a Germanic language and a Latin-based language - you will find a lot of
    words that are common to both languages, even if those words precede
    certain inventions whose name became adopted in all languages. For
    instance, "color" in US English and "colour" in British English versus
    "couleur" in French.

    > German shares many words with polish too, - or word roots,
    > like for dziekuje (thanks), where one can clearly hear a form of
    > "danke".


    Hmm... As far as I know - please contradict me if I'm wrong - Polish is a
    Slavic language, of the same family as Russian, Czech, Croatian, etc. That
    would normally be a different linguistic origin, but like I said, a lot of
    words are common to all languages.

    We have a lot of Moroccans here in Belgium. They natively speak a dialect
    of Arabic called Berber - which is actually not even understood by a real
    Arab - and I always find it amusing if they're talking among themselves in
    their native tongue and mix in Dutch words because their native tongue
    doesn't _have_ any words for those things. :-)

    Likewise, you will find a lot of English words in Japanese, simply because
    there is - or was, at the time of the introduction of the given concept -
    no Japanese word for certain things.

    If you open up a Japanese tourist dictionary, you will find Japanese words
    there whose meaning is very obvious to English-speakers, e.g...:
    - toiletto pepa
    - pokketu naifu
    - chealida
    - ...

    ;-)

    > Anyway, Tak in polish means Yes...


    I haven't gotten around to Polish yet. /"Polishing",/ yes, but that's a
    whole different subject altogether... ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  3. Re: I give up.

    Yes, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Finnish are all Germanic languages.
    > Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland are all also covered under the common
    > denominator "Scandinavia", and so their respective languages, although
    > still quite different, bear a lot of resemblance. ;-)

    ========================================
    Of the above referred languages Finnish is not considered a scandinavian
    language. It is related to Hungarian and is the consequence of migration
    in medieval or earlier times.


    Frank

  4. Re: I give up.

    On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 11:05:59 +0100, Highland Ham wrote:

    > Yes, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Finnish are all Germanic languages.
    >> Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland are all also covered under the
    >> common denominator "Scandinavia", and so their respective languages,
    >> although still quite different, bear a lot of resemblance. ;-)

    > ======================================== Of the above referred languages
    > Finnish is not considered a scandinavian language. It is related to
    > Hungarian and is the consequence of migration in medieval or earlier
    > times.


    Indeed it is not scandinavian or germanic. Suomi is one of the finno-
    ugric family, together with Hungarian, Estonian, and a few other less-
    well known languages.

    WIYF.

    Are we off-topic yet?????????

    ;-)

    On topic: How many of these languages are supported in Mandriva? I have
    heard some complaints about the low quality of the Norwegian translations
    in Mandriva, so there are at least some of those nominally supported.

  5. Re: I give up.

    Aragorn wrote:
    > Yes, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Finnish are all Germanic languages.
    > Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland are all also covered under the common
    > denominator "Scandinavia", and so their respective languages, although
    > still quite different, bear a lot of resemblance. ;-)


    Finnish? Germanic? My understanding is that it is somehow
    related to the Ural-Altaic family of languages (as are
    Hungarian, Turkish, Mongolian, Korean, Japanese, and maybe
    Basque).

    I am aware of arguments over correct association of these
    languages (everybody wants to be unique and special!),
    such as the grammar of Hungarian indicating association
    with Mongolian but the basic words most often preserved
    over the centuries as languages develop clearly not of
    Mongolian derivation. Still, I think most still group
    Finn with Ural-Altaic.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  6. Re: I give up.

    marksouth wrote:

    > [...]
    >
    > On topic: How many of these languages are supported in Mandriva? I have
    > heard some complaints about the low quality of the Norwegian translations
    > in Mandriva, so there are at least some of those nominally supported.


    Well, even if the translations are poor - it's the first time I hear of that
    with regard to Mandriva and Norwegian, by the way - then at least they are
    supported.

    There are loads of other distributions out there with far less extensive
    locales support than Mandriva. And all serious operating systems aside,
    then there's also something that Microsoft keeps shoving down people's
    throats and that up until Vista required purchasing a different license for
    each locale version, the offer in total being just a handful of languages.

    I have known Mandriva to support Afrikaans, Zulu, Xhosa, the Wallonian
    dialect of French, Welsh, you name it.

    Hmm... I think I'll file for a feature request and propose that they
    include *Klingon* in their distro...

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  7. Re: I give up.

    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Aragorn wrote:
    >> Yes, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and Finnish are all Germanic languages.
    >> Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland are all also covered under the common
    >> denominator "Scandinavia", and so their respective languages, although
    >> still quite different, bear a lot of resemblance. ;-)

    >
    > Finnish? Germanic? My understanding is that it is somehow
    > related to the Ural-Altaic family of languages (as are
    > Hungarian, Turkish, Mongolian, Korean, Japanese, and maybe
    > Basque).
    >
    > I am aware of arguments over correct association of these
    > languages (everybody wants to be unique and special!),
    > such as the grammar of Hungarian indicating association
    > with Mongolian but the basic words most often preserved
    > over the centuries as languages develop clearly not of
    > Mongolian derivation. Still, I think most still group
    > Finn with Ural-Altaic.


    Well, I stand corrected on the Finnish language then, but over here, Finland
    is still considered (by most) to be part of Scandinavia, and that was my
    point, even if that too is not correct. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  8. Re: I give up.

    Aragorn wrote:
    > Well, I stand corrected on the Finnish language then, but over here, Finland
    > is still considered (by most) to be part of Scandinavia, and that was my
    > point, even if that too is not correct. ;-)


    I would not argue about the geographical association.

    And your comment about words being swapped around among
    languages is quite pertinent. This can give rise to
    the "false cognate" problem, as when a French word looks
    or sounds like an English word but has a distinctly
    different meaning, but that can occur even within a
    language.

    My wife, a native speaker of Texan, went into a
    clothing store in Cheltenham and told a clerk she
    wanted to buy some pants for her son. The clerk
    was horrified.

    It seems my wife should have indicated an interest
    in "trousers" for her son, as "pants" is British
    for what Americans call panties.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  9. Re: I give up.

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 00:45:52 +0000, Jim Beard wrote:

    > My wife, a native speaker of Texan, went into a
    > clothing store in Cheltenham and told a clerk she
    > wanted to buy some pants for her son. The clerk
    > was horrified.


    > It seems my wife should have indicated an interest
    > in "trousers" for her son, as "pants" is British
    > for what Americans call panties.


    So, as the Texans would say, it's the women in Britain who wear the pants
    in the family.

    No surprise there.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org


  10. Re: I give up.

    Dan C wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 00:45:52 +0000, Jim Beard wrote:
    >
    >> My wife, a native speaker of Texan, went into a
    >> clothing store in Cheltenham and told a clerk she
    >> wanted to buy some pants for her son. The clerk
    >> was horrified.

    >
    >> It seems my wife should have indicated an interest
    >> in "trousers" for her son, as "pants" is British
    >> for what Americans call panties.

    >
    >So, as the Texans would say, it's the women in Britain who wear the pants
    >in the family.
    >
    >No surprise there.


    Nah. What Americans call panties, the British call knickers.

    And "pants" are the British name for slips or y-fronts. And according to
    Wikipedia, Americans call those "tightie-whities" -- is that true???

    --
    Dave Farrance

  11. Re: I give up.

    On Apr 25, 2:07 pm, Frank Peelo wrote:
    > Santo wrote:
    > > On Apr 15, 2:56 am, Aragorn wrote:

    >
    > >>evodawg wrote:

    >
    > >>>Welcome back!!! Your input has been missed.

    >
    > >>>Rich

    >
    > >>Muchas grašias, merci beaucoup, vielen dank, hartelijk bedankt, grazi,domo
    > >>arregato, oh, and thanks a lot as well...

    >
    > >>--
    > >>Aragorn
    > >>(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

    >
    > > ...from office...
    > > very late but welcome back from me as well...by the way, it is
    > > grazie;... grazie...with an "e " at the end......we have many vowels
    > > in Italian and they should all be spelled and pronounced...

    >
    > Consonants too, I heard; or at least I was told, when ordering penne
    > pasta, that I had to pronounce BOTH of instances of the 'n'.


    ...Oh Boy!...You really WANT to double that "n"...

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