I got caught (Lilypond in Beta 2) - Mandriva

This is a discussion on I got caught (Lilypond in Beta 2) - Mandriva ; I have just installed Mandriva Spring Beta 2, and it is generally quite usable. I didn't get the problems that Ar had with the 64-bit version, but I did strike one problem that is important to me. The version of ...

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Thread: I got caught (Lilypond in Beta 2)

  1. I got caught (Lilypond in Beta 2)

    I have just installed Mandriva Spring Beta 2, and it is generally quite
    usable. I didn't get the problems that Ar had with the 64-bit version, but
    I did strike one problem that is important to me.

    The version of Lilypond supplied is the development version 2.11.40 It has
    a known bug in convert-ly, and a new development version 41 has been
    released. Unfortunately I am producing sheet music for myself and another
    player, so I am installing the stable release.

    In earlier times, before Fedora and Mandriva, an introductory book suggested
    that this was the difference between Red Hat and Mandrake, that Red Hat
    used only the tried and true libraries and packages, while Mandrake tended
    to approach closer to the "bleeding edge". A bit like Firefox insisting
    that unless a version had the latest and greatest features, it could not be
    called Firefox, and Debian wanting only what was known to work, so they
    called their rolled-back version Iceweasel.

    This is only a passing problem, and it will be fixed soon, so I won't be
    dumping Mandriva. But it does seem that the original comparison had some
    truth in it.

    Doug.



  2. Re: I got caught (Lilypond in Beta 2)

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    > In earlier times, before Fedora and Mandriva, an introductory book suggested
    > that this was the difference between Red Hat and Mandrake, that Red Hat
    > used only the tried and true libraries and packages, while Mandrake tended
    > to approach closer to the "bleeding edge".


    My take, from watching interplay in the industry
    but with no "insider knowledge whatsoever" is that
    Red Hat decided that for financial viability, it
    had to focus on commercial sales of its services.

    Commercial operators did not like beta-test
    software being installed on production-status
    machines. Red hat perforce had to use only
    "the tried and true."

    This hampered efforts to stay abreast of changes,
    and Fedora was the eventual approach to take care
    of that aspect.

    Mandrake separated from Red Hat largely because
    that bunch of people felt it important to
    emphasize the desktop for home users and others
    who were using Micro$loth.

    This bifurcated things in more than one way.
    Red Hat's competition was UNIX, as Micro$loth
    servers back then were a small fraction of the
    market. Mandrake's competition was Micro$loth,
    and those customers would buy flaky buggy crap
    to get the "latest and greatest." Anyone
    intending to supply them would have to bear
    that in mind.

    Choices in how close to stay to the bleeding
    edge clearly reflected the above, and still
    do.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

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