Zapping a Drive - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Zapping a Drive - Mandriva ; Once again I have dd failing to copy one drive to a clone. The answer last time was one or more corruptions on the target drive. To wipe the drive painlessly, I booted from a DOS floppy and ran PZAPPER.EXE ...

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Thread: Zapping a Drive

  1. Zapping a Drive

    Once again I have dd failing to copy one drive to a clone. The answer last
    time was one or more corruptions on the target drive. To wipe the drive
    painlessly, I booted from a DOS floppy and ran PZAPPER.EXE which wipes the
    boot record of a selected drive.

    Is there a way of doing much the same thing under Linux (but equally without
    a potential whoops factor)?



  2. Re: Zapping a Drive

    On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 14:52:12 +0000, Alan Secker wrote:
    > Once again I have dd failing to copy one drive to a clone. The answer last
    > time was one or more corruptions on the target drive.


    Think about it, drives would not have the same bad blocks in the same
    location on target drive, if any.

    dd is going to copy badblock tags to clone which would not have those
    bad blocks. Downside is you could be dd'ing data into bad blocks on
    target drive and that is not good.

    > To wipe the drive painlessly, I booted from a DOS floppy and ran
    > PZAPPER.EXE which wipes the boot record of a selected drive.
    > Is there a way of doing much the same thing under Linux (but equally without
    > a potential whoops factor)?


    There is no protection as you have stated the request.

    You want to wipe mbr and partition table on hdb then
    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=512 count=1
    wipe just mbr
    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=1 count=446

    Personally, I would want to create/format partitions to rule out
    possible bad block issues on target drive and use
    cp -a or rsync -av to copy each partition.

    Put commands is a script and whoops factor goes way down after you
    have debugged the script.

  3. Re: Zapping a Drive

    On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 14:52:12 +0000, Alan Secker wrote:

    > Once again I have dd failing to copy one drive to a clone. The answer
    > last time was one or more corruptions on the target drive. To wipe the
    > drive painlessly, I booted from a DOS floppy and ran PZAPPER.EXE which
    > wipes the boot record of a selected drive.
    >
    > Is there a way of doing much the same thing under Linux (but equally
    > without a potential whoops factor)?


    As BT explained, there are much better ways to do this. Is your object a
    backup, or a clone? When I replaced the 40gb drive on my laptop, I saved
    partition table to an external USB drive then used a Live CD with
    partimage to copy the partitions. I then swapped drives, reloaded the
    Live CD and restore everything from the USB drive. Simple, relatively
    quick, and rather painless.

  4. Re: Zapping a Drive

    Bit Twister wrote:


    >
    > There is no protection as you have stated the request.
    >
    > You want to wipe mbr and partition table on hdb then
    > dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=512 count=1
    > wipe just mbr
    > dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=1 count=446
    >
    > Personally, I would want to create/format partitions to rule out
    > possible bad block issues on target drive and use
    > cp -a or rsync -av to copy each partition.
    >
    > Put commands is a script and whoops factor goes way down after you
    > have debugged the script.




    As it happens, a while ago I downloaded a drive fitness tester, from
    memory I believe from Hitachi. It self boots from a CD. I think I'll give
    that a go before using the above and starting again.

    I like to clone my hard drives now and again when they are stable and
    when I'm about to 'try' something. Belt and braces for me.

    Thanks for the above. Much appreciated.

    Alan

  5. Re: Zapping a Drive

    Alan Secker wrote:

    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> There is no protection as you have stated the request.
    >>
    >> You want to wipe mbr and partition table on hdb then
    >> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=512 count=1
    >> wipe just mbr
    >> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=1 count=446
    >>
    >> Personally, I would want to create/format partitions to rule out
    >> possible bad block issues on target drive and use
    >> cp -a or rsync -av to copy each partition.
    >>
    >> Put commands is a script and whoops factor goes way down after you
    >> have debugged the script.

    >
    >

    >
    > As it happens, a while ago I downloaded a drive fitness tester, from
    > memory I believe from Hitachi. It self boots from a CD. I think I'll give
    > that a go before using the above and starting again.
    >
    > I like to clone my hard drives now and again when they are stable and
    > when I'm about to 'try' something. Belt and braces for me.
    >
    > Thanks for the above. Much appreciated.
    >
    > Alan


    It was from Hitach but I found it doesn't 'like Serial AT drives!!!!



  6. Re: Zapping a Drive

    On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 22:21:04 +0000, Alan Secker wrote:

    > Alan Secker wrote:
    >
    >> Bit Twister wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> There is no protection as you have stated the request.
    >>>
    >>> You want to wipe mbr and partition table on hdb then
    >>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=512 count=1
    >>> wipe just mbr
    >>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdb bs=1 count=446
    >>>
    >>> Personally, I would want to create/format partitions to rule out
    >>> possible bad block issues on target drive and use
    >>> cp -a or rsync -av to copy each partition.
    >>>
    >>> Put commands is a script and whoops factor goes way down after you
    >>> have debugged the script.

    >>
    >>

    >>
    >> As it happens, a while ago I downloaded a drive fitness tester, from
    >> memory I believe from Hitachi. It self boots from a CD. I think I'll give
    >> that a go before using the above and starting again.
    >>
    >> I like to clone my hard drives now and again when they are stable and
    >> when I'm about to 'try' something. Belt and braces for me.
    >>
    >> Thanks for the above. Much appreciated.
    >>
    >> Alan

    >
    > It was from Hitach but I found it doesn't 'like Serial AT drives!!!!


    I had the same problem a couple of days ago. The Hitachi tool hangs at the
    ATA CD/DVD-RW units too. Ran the drive scan from Seagate on it, using the
    Ultimate Boot CD, which came up with the 4 errors in the first 1% of the
    drive, which had been plaguing my booting process, and a totally clean
    disk after that. It would not attempt a repair, as the drive was Hitachi,
    and not of their manufacture.

    Being as overwriting with dd hadn't worked to clear the bad blocks, I ran
    DBAN over it, only for the first 2% then rescanned with the Seagate tools,
    which then pronounced it clean, throughout.

    Repartitioned it, as it had been, with fdisk, used mkfs to format it to
    ext3, and rsync -av to move the / system files, /home, /data, /
    files from their temporary storage locations on another drive. I put the
    files in the temporary storage previously by also using rsync -av.

    I then reinstalled grub to the MBR. It worked perfectly, runs like a fresh
    installation, and all the boot problems from IO errors were eliminated.

    DBAN is here;

    http://dban.sourceforge.net/

    Ultimate Boot CD is here, and has DBAN, and the Seagate tool I used, on it.

    http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/

    The only things that didn't work as advertised, on the entire disk, are
    the two Hitachi tools.

    BT"s right about dd being great for either wiping the MBR, or backing it
    up, but it's really the wrong tool for transferring a whole system. Using
    rsync -av for each partition is a much better choice, and much quicker too.

    --
    old-polack
    Of what use be there for joy, if not for the sharing thereof?



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