/proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz - Mandriva

This is a discussion on /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz - Mandriva ; I'm running 2008.0 x86_64 Why is processor 1 showing correct Mhz but the other 3 show only ~1600Mhz? In fact I now see this changes dynamically from minute to minute. I just did another cat /proc/cpuinfo and this time its ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

  1. /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    I'm running 2008.0 x86_64
    Why is processor 1 showing correct Mhz but the other 3 show only ~1600Mhz?
    In fact I now see this changes dynamically from minute to minute. I just did
    another cat /proc/cpuinfo and this time its core 2 thats correct while
    0,1,3 are slow. Am I having cpu troubles?
    gkrellm shows temps in the high 30's C at the moment on all 4 cores.

    cat /proc/cpuinfo
    processor : 0
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 15
    model name : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz
    stepping : 11
    cpu MHz : 1596.000
    cache size : 4096 KB
    physical id : 0
    siblings : 4
    core id : 0
    cpu cores : 4
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 10
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca
    cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm
    constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm
    bogomips : 4969.61
    clflush size : 64
    cache_alignment : 64
    address sizes : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
    power management:

    processor : 1
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 15
    model name : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz
    stepping : 11
    cpu MHz : 2394.000
    cache size : 4096 KB
    physical id : 0
    siblings : 4
    core id : 2
    cpu cores : 4
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 10
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca
    cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm
    constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm
    bogomips : 4775.98
    clflush size : 64
    cache_alignment : 64
    address sizes : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
    power management:

    processor : 2
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 15
    model name : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz
    stepping : 11
    cpu MHz : 1596.000
    cache size : 4096 KB
    physical id : 0
    siblings : 4
    core id : 1
    cpu cores : 4
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 10
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca
    cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm
    constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm
    bogomips : 4776.00
    clflush size : 64
    cache_alignment : 64
    address sizes : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
    power management:

    processor : 3
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 15
    model name : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz
    stepping : 11
    cpu MHz : 1596.000
    cache size : 4096 KB
    physical id : 0
    siblings : 4
    core id : 3
    cpu cores : 4
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 10
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca
    cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm
    constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm
    bogomips : 4871.51
    clflush size : 64
    cache_alignment : 64
    address sizes : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
    power management:
    Thanks
    Eric

  2. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    Eric wrote:
    > I'm running 2008.0 x86_64
    > Why is processor 1 showing correct Mhz but the other 3 show only ~1600Mhz?
    > In fact I now see this changes dynamically from minute to minute. I just did
    > another cat /proc/cpuinfo and this time its core 2 thats correct while
    > 0,1,3 are slow. Am I having cpu troubles?
    > gkrellm shows temps in the high 30's C at the moment on all 4 cores.
    >
    > cat /proc/cpuinfo




    The OS is using dynamic cpufrequency control. With four cores,
    your machine is probably rarely working at more than a percent
    or two of capacity, so the speed is throttled back to reduce
    power consumption and heat.

    You can install (or maybe enable) software that allows setting
    the machine for maximum performance, and it will then use a
    different scheduler and run all cores at full speed at all times.

    I have one tmb kernel with maximum cpu frequency and the
    cfq I/O scheduler compiled in, not subject to change. But
    frankly I can't tell the difference between that and the
    defaults used by the stock tmb kernel. And I only have
    two 2.4 GHz cores.

    Re temp, human body temp is 36 or 37 degrees C, so your
    cores are about as warm-hearted as you are. Nowhere close
    to cause for concern.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  3. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Eric wrote:
    >> I'm running 2008.0 x86_64
    >> Why is processor 1 showing correct Mhz but the other 3 show only
    >> ~1600Mhz? In fact I now see this changes dynamically from minute to
    >> minute. I just did another cat /proc/cpuinfo and this time its core 2
    >> thats correct while 0,1,3 are slow. Am I having cpu troubles?
    >> gkrellm shows temps in the high 30's C at the moment on all 4 cores.
    >>
    >> cat /proc/cpuinfo

    >
    >
    >
    > The OS is using dynamic cpufrequency control. With four cores,
    > your machine is probably rarely working at more than a percent
    > or two of capacity, so the speed is throttled back to reduce
    > power consumption and heat.
    >
    > You can install (or maybe enable) software that allows setting
    > the machine for maximum performance, and it will then use a
    > different scheduler and run all cores at full speed at all times.
    >
    > I have one tmb kernel with maximum cpu frequency and the
    > cfq I/O scheduler compiled in, not subject to change. But
    > frankly I can't tell the difference between that and the
    > defaults used by the stock tmb kernel. And I only have
    > two 2.4 GHz cores.
    >
    > Re temp, human body temp is 36 or 37 degrees C, so your
    > cores are about as warm-hearted as you are. Nowhere close
    > to cause for concern.
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >

    What is the tmb kernel? I've seen references to it but what does tmb stand
    for?
    Eric


  4. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    Eric wrote:
    > What is the tmb kernel? I've seen references to it but what does tmb stand
    > for?


    QUOTE
    kernel-tmb-desktop-2.6.23.12-2mdv - Linux Kernel for desktop use with
    x86_64​ 

    The kernel package contains the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of
    your Mandriva Linux operating system. The kernel handles the basic
    functions of the operating system: memory allocation, process
    allocation, device input and output, etc. This kernel is compiled for
    desktop use, single or multiple x86_64 processor(s)/core(s), using
    voluntary preempt, CFS cpu scheduler and cfq i/o scheduler. This
    kernel relies on in-kernel smp alternatives to switch between up &
    smp mode depending on detected hardware. To force the kernel to boot
    in single processor mode, use the "nosmp" boot parameter.

    For instructions for update, see:
    http://www.mandriva.com/security/kernelupdate

    The tmb kernels is an experimental kernel based on the kernel.org
    kernels with added patches. Some of them may/will never end up in the
    main kernels due to their experimental nature. Some refer to this
    kernel as a 'hackkernel' ... Use these kernels at your own risk !!

    If you want more info on the various kernel-tmb flavours, please
    visit: http://www.iki.fi/tmb/Kernels/
    ENDQUOTE

    The above obtained by opening mcc > Software Mangement > Manage
    software and a search for tmb plus scrolling down to the section
    dealing with kernels and highlighting one. The most recent one
    for my machine, in this case.

    Work on the multimedia kernels slowed dramatically a year or
    more ago. I read that the effort had shifted mainly to the tmb
    kernels, with only one guy maintaining the mm kernels, so I
    took a look and tried it. The rc8 (release candidate 8) package
    bombed out on my system, but subsequent release versions have
    worked very nicely.

    Cheers!

    jim b.


    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  5. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Eric wrote:
    >> What is the tmb kernel? I've seen references to it but what does tmb
    >> stand for?

    >
    > QUOTE
    > kernel-tmb-desktop-2.6.23.12-2mdv - Linux Kernel for desktop use with
    > x86_64​ 
    >
    > The kernel package contains the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of
    > your Mandriva Linux operating system. The kernel handles the basic
    > functions of the operating system: memory allocation, process
    > allocation, device input and output, etc. This kernel is compiled for
    > desktop use, single or multiple x86_64 processor(s)/core(s), using
    > voluntary preempt, CFS cpu scheduler and cfq i/o scheduler. This
    > kernel relies on in-kernel smp alternatives to switch between up &
    > smp mode depending on detected hardware. To force the kernel to boot
    > in single processor mode, use the "nosmp" boot parameter.
    >
    > For instructions for update, see:
    > http://www.mandriva.com/security/kernelupdate
    >
    > The tmb kernels is an experimental kernel based on the kernel.org
    > kernels with added patches. Some of them may/will never end up in the
    > main kernels due to their experimental nature. Some refer to this
    > kernel as a 'hackkernel' ... Use these kernels at your own risk !!
    >
    > If you want more info on the various kernel-tmb flavours, please
    > visit: http://www.iki.fi/tmb/Kernels/
    > ENDQUOTE
    >
    > The above obtained by opening mcc > Software Mangement > Manage
    > software and a search for tmb plus scrolling down to the section
    > dealing with kernels and highlighting one. The most recent one
    > for my machine, in this case.
    >
    > Work on the multimedia kernels slowed dramatically a year or
    > more ago. I read that the effort had shifted mainly to the tmb
    > kernels, with only one guy maintaining the mm kernels, so I
    > took a look and tried it. The rc8 (release candidate 8) package
    > bombed out on my system, but subsequent release versions have
    > worked very nicely.
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >
    >

    right, I read that before, but i still dont know what tmb stands for. "The
    Multimedia Bomb"? "Too Many Bugs"? "The Most Bestest" kernel ever? :-) It
    seems its just a basic mandriva kernel with a few options selected to allow
    for multimedia use? Also, it uses that same basic description for all the
    kernels with slight mods to account for 64 or 32 bits but they dont tell
    you the reason e.g "This kernel is setup for multimedia use on 64 bit with
    less than 900 meg of ram" or "This kernel is for multimedia desktop use
    when you have more than 860 megs but <=4 gig of ram".
    For example the the mandriva 64 bit kernel I chose is
    "kernel-desktop-2.6.22.12-1mdv 1-1mdv2008.0 x86_64" and its description
    says:
    "The kernel package contains the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of your
    Mandriva Linux operating system. The kernel handles the basic functions of
    the operating system: memory allocation, process allocation, device input
    and output, etc. This kernel is compiled for desktop use, single or
    multiple x86_64 processor(s)/core(s), using HZ_1000, voluntary preempt, CFS
    cpu scheduler and cfq i/o scheduler. This kernel relies on in-kernel smp
    alternatives to switch between up & smp mode depending on detected
    hardware. To force the kernel to boot in single processor mode, use
    the "nosmp" boot parameter."

    so "up" and "smp" mode - in my mind have no relation. Why you would switch,
    (how can you?) between an up kernel (one with "up to" 4gig if i recall
    correctly) and smp "Symetric Multi Processing" (how the interrupts are
    directed when there is more than 1 cpu) : confusing to me, but I may be
    just a little dimm (get it? :-))

    I installed that kernel after the install was done and then modified it a
    little to match my processor, amount of memory etc and now I boot
    2.6.22.12-1mdv-cstm and it seems to work very nicely.
    But I'm always watching for stuff to go wrong (which most likely will be due
    to any option mods i made...
    The cpuinfo thing really surprised me - but at that particular time
    seti@home was idle (just by coincidence I had idled it) and now that its
    running steady - 1 copy per core - all my cpuinfo's show a steady
    "cpu MHz : 2394.000"

    So, I'm happy, its actually nice to know that the system will power save
    some when not busy. Is there an applet somewhere that lets you control
    system sleep, system hybernation and stuff (not the monitor, i have found
    that ok)
    Thanks
    Eric

  6. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    On Tue, 22 Jan 2008 21:36:58 -0500, Eric wrote:


    > right, I read that before, but i still dont know what tmb stands for. "The


    I gather, from looking at the kernel-tmb homepage, specifically, the contact
    link, that tmb are the initials, of the person at Mandriva, who is releasing
    the rpms.

    > so "up" and "smp" mode - in my mind have no relation. Why you would switch,


    UniProcessing (single cpu/core) vs Symetric Mult-Processing (multi-cpu/core).

    Switching would be done by the kernel, depending on how many processors
    it detects.

    > So, I'm happy, its actually nice to know that the system will power save
    > some when not busy. Is there an applet somewhere that lets you control
    > system sleep, system hybernation and stuff (not the monitor, i have found


    I gather that you're looking for the suspend to disk/suspend to ram options
    available in kpowersave, under kde, but for a gnome applet. That I can't
    help you with.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  7. Re: /proc/cpuinfo reporting slow Mhz

    Eric wrote:
    > right, I read that before, but i still dont know what tmb stands for.


    Nor do I. Nor do I care.

    > seems its just a basic mandriva kernel with a few options selected to allow
    > for multimedia use?


    2.6.23.14-tmb-desktop-1mdv is a more recent kernel than the basic
    mandriva kernel, 2.6.22.12-1mdv-1-1mdv.

    If you want to know the differences, install it, and then run a diff
    on config-2.6.22.12-desktop-1mdv and config-2.6.23.14-tmb-desktop-1mdv.

    If you need more than that, it is time to Use the Source, Luke!

    > This kernel relies on in-kernel smp
    > alternatives to switch between up & smp mode depending on detected
    > hardware. To force the kernel to boot in single processor mode, use
    > the "nosmp" boot parameter."
    >
    > so "up" and "smp" mode - in my mind have no relation.


    If the specific hardware in place will run as smp, that is what
    you will get (unless you tell the kernel otherwise at boot time).
    If the hardware in place will not run properly as smp, even though
    there is more than one core or more than one processor, the kernel
    will run in uniprocessor mode. For normal use, making use of the
    smp capability if available is a no-brainer, but I can imagine
    circumstances (system software development, for instance) when one
    might want to run an smp machine in up mode.

    > The cpuinfo thing really surprised me - but at that particular time
    > seti@home was idle (just by coincidence I had idled it) and now that its
    > running steady - 1 copy per core - all my cpuinfo's show a steady
    > "cpu MHz : 2394.000"


    The custom kernel can be tailored to run at max speed (set for
    performance) and otherwise disable the power management functions,
    if you wish.

    > So, I'm happy, its actually nice to know that the system will power save
    > some when not busy. Is there an applet somewhere that lets you control
    > system sleep, system hybernation and stuff (not the monitor, i have found
    > that ok)


    Yes, but I don't fool with such things and forget what packages
    you need for the interface. The functionality is built into acpi I
    think, but could be wrong on that. The old apm was advanced power
    management, so its successor should be similar. Go Google!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

+ Reply to Thread