Which new kernel to use? - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Which new kernel to use? - Mandriva ; During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed: desktop 2.6.22.9-1 desktop 2.6.22.9-2 with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst. I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the first was ...

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  1. Which new kernel to use?

    During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:

    desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    desktop 2.6.22.9-2

    with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.

    I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    first was also installed.

    (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)

    --
    Maurice
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)


  2. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    On 2007-11-29, Maurice Batey wrote:
    > During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    > (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:
    >
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-2
    >
    > with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.
    >
    > I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    > first was also installed.
    >
    > (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)


    I think that while there was only one kernel installed, Grub offered you
    only the 'Mandriva Linux' and 'Safe Mode' options; now that there are two
    kernels installed, Grub is offering you both of them as well as the
    'Mandriva' and 'Safe mode' options. That is, you used to have only one
    kernel so there was no point in listing just the one; now you have two so
    it's worth offering you a choice.

    If you run

    uname -r

    you will see which kernel you are running at present. To use the other
    one, choose it manually next time you boot the system.

    I usually select the new kernel after first installing it, and thereafter
    the 'Mandriva Linux' option in Grub seems to use that one every time.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~

  3. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Whiskers wrote:
    > If you run
    >
    > uname -r
    >
    > you will see which kernel you are running at present. To use the other
    > one, choose it manually next time you boot the system.
    >
    > I usually select the new kernel after first installing it, and thereafter
    > the 'Mandriva Linux' option in Grub seems to use that one every time.
    >


    Thanks for the uname -r tip. I believe Grub runs the latest kernel
    version automatically, and you have to specifically select an older
    version to do otherwise. I'm currently running 2.6.22.12-laptop-1mdv,
    and I've never specifically selected it, just booted with the first
    option on the Grub menu.
    Art

  4. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    on Friday 30 November 2007 06:57
    in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    > (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:
    >
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-2
    >
    > with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.
    >
    > I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    > first was also installed.
    >
    > (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)


    You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.

    While the first three sections stay the same an increase in the
    fourth means more bug fixes. Unless there has been a major
    stuff-up you will always want to use the kernel with the most
    bug fixes.

    Because the kernel is critical to the system as a whole it does
    not get replaced, a new one is installed alongside the old one
    so that you can go back.

    There should be a link in /boot with a generic name that points
    to the most recent kernel. Type "ls -l /boot/kernel*" in a terminal
    to see. So if you just let the system do its thing when it reboots
    it should use the latest kernel, "uname -a" to check.

    Changing kernels is one of the few times that you need to reboot.


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

  5. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    on Friday 30 November 2007 06:57
    in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    Maurice Batey wrote:

    > During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    > (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:
    >
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    > desktop 2.6.22.9-2
    >
    > with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.
    >
    > I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    > first was also installed.
    >
    > (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)


    You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.

    While the first three sections stay the same an increase in the
    fourth means more bug fixes. Unless there has been a major
    stuff-up you will always want to use the kernel with the most
    bug fixes.

    Because the kernel is critical to the system as a whole it does
    not get replaced, a new one is installed alongside the old one
    so that you can go back.

    There should be a link in /boot with a generic name that points
    to the most recent kernel. Type "ls -l /boot/vmlinuz*" in a terminal
    to see. So if you just let the system do its thing when it reboots
    it should use the latest kernel, "uname -a" to check.

    Changing kernels is one of the few times that you need to reboot.


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

  6. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    art wrote:
    > Whiskers wrote:
    >> If you run
    >> uname -r
    >> you will see which kernel you are running at present. To use the
    >> other one, choose it manually next time you boot the system.
    >>
    >> I usually select the new kernel after first installing it, and
    >> thereafter the 'Mandriva Linux' option in Grub seems to use that one
    >> every time.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the uname -r tip. I believe Grub runs the latest kernel
    > version automatically, and you have to specifically select an older
    > version to do otherwise. I'm currently running 2.6.22.12-laptop-1mdv,
    > and I've never specifically selected it, just booted with the first
    > option on the Grub menu.
    > Art


    Grub automatically runs the first entry in the menu.lst, unless you
    select otherwise. Mandriva distribution normally sets this first
    entry to point to /boot/vmlinuz which is a symbolic link to a kernel
    with a name something like vmlinuz-2.6.22.9-desktop-2mdv.

    The install procedure _normally_ sets symbolic link vmlinuz to the
    newly installed kernel, but this is worth checking, IMHO.

    When you install kernel source or kernel devel for compiling a kernel
    or drivers, that install procedure -- likewise -- normally creates a
    symbolic /usr/src/linux that points to the top of the directory tree
    for the new kernel source/devel. If you later need to compile
    drivers for an earlier kernel, you may have to delete this symbolic
    link and create a new one pointing to the kernel you wish to compile for.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  7. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Peter D. wrote:
    > on Friday 30 November 2007 06:57
    > in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    > Maurice Batey wrote:
    >
    >> During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    >> (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:
    >>
    >> desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    >> desktop 2.6.22.9-2
    >>
    >> with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.
    >>
    >> I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    >> first was also installed.
    >>
    >> (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)

    >
    > You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.
    >


    2.6.22.12 is just starting to become available for the i586 on some
    of the U.S. mirrors. The 64-bit version is not yet available where
    I checked.

    I did find a multimedia 2.6.23.0-rc8 kernel. Does anyone know how
    well this one works?

    2008.0 plus updates replaced the gcc compiler 4.1 with 4.2.2, and
    the nVidia requirement that both kernel and drivers be compiled with
    the same compiler mean I have to recompile all 2007.1 kernels from
    source or forego nVidia drivers/Xwindows. An up-to-date multimedia
    kernel would be nice...

    Cheers!

    jim b.


    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  8. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    on Friday 30 November 2007 15:15
    in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Peter D. wrote:
    >> on Friday 30 November 2007 06:57
    >> in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    >> Maurice Batey wrote:
    >>
    >>> During a large post-installation update on 2008.0 PowerPack
    >>> (32-bit, KDE), two new kernels were installed:
    >>>
    >>> desktop 2.6.22.9-1
    >>> desktop 2.6.22.9-2
    >>>
    >>> with appropriate additions to the GRUB menu.lst.
    >>>

    +>>> I assume the 2nd version should be used, but wonder why the
    >>> first was also installed.
    >>>
    >>> (Similarly on the laptop, but with 'laptop' prefix.)

    >>
    >> You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.
    >>

    >
    > 2.6.22.12 is just starting to become available for the i586 on some
    > of the U.S. mirrors. The 64-bit version is not yet available where
    > I checked.


    Wait a day and try again.

    > I did find a multimedia 2.6.23.0-rc8 kernel. Does anyone know how
    > well this one works?


    Where did you find it?

    Unless you have a reason for using a different kernel, don't.

    > 2008.0 plus updates replaced the gcc compiler 4.1 with 4.2.2, and
    > the nVidia requirement that both kernel and drivers be compiled with
    > the same compiler mean I have to recompile all 2007.1 kernels


    Are you using 2008.0 or 2007.1? Mixing and matching bits and pieces
    can be made to work, but I don't recommend it. Go to a pure 2008.0
    system and let Mandriva do the compilation.

    > from
    > source or forego nVidia drivers/Xwindows. An up-to-date multimedia
    > kernel would be nice...


    What is wrong with the standard (Mandriva) kernel?

    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >
    >


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

  9. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    on Friday 30 November 2007 15:02
    in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    Jim Beard wrote:

    > art wrote:
    >> Whiskers wrote:
    >>> If you run
    >>> uname -r
    >>> you will see which kernel you are running at present. To use the
    >>> other one, choose it manually next time you boot the system.
    >>>
    >>> I usually select the new kernel after first installing it, and
    >>> thereafter the 'Mandriva Linux' option in Grub seems to use that one
    >>> every time.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Thanks for the uname -r tip. I believe Grub runs the latest kernel
    >> version automatically, and you have to specifically select an older
    >> version to do otherwise. I'm currently running 2.6.22.12-laptop-1mdv,
    >> and I've never specifically selected it, just booted with the first
    >> option on the Grub menu.
    >> Art

    >
    > Grub automatically runs the first entry in the menu.lst, unless you
    > select otherwise. Mandriva distribution normally sets this first
    > entry to point to /boot/vmlinuz which is a symbolic link to a kernel
    > with a name something like vmlinuz-2.6.22.9-desktop-2mdv.


    There is a minor bug in the update
    http://qa.mandriva.com/show_bug.cgi?id=35878
    go for vmlinuz-desktop.

    > The install procedure _normally_ sets symbolic link vmlinuz to the
    > newly installed kernel, but this is worth checking, IMHO.


    Most certainly.

    > When you install kernel source or kernel devel for compiling a kernel
    > or drivers, that install procedure -- likewise -- normally creates a
    > symbolic /usr/src/linux that points to the top of the directory tree
    > for the new kernel source/devel. If you later need to compile
    > drivers for an earlier kernel, you may have to delete this symbolic
    > link and create a new one pointing to the kernel you wish to compile for.
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

  10. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 21:29:16 +0000, Whiskers wrote:

    > I usually select the new kernel after first installing it, and thereafter
    > the 'Mandriva Linux' option in Grub seems to use that one every time.


    So it does - that's neat.

    But I prefer to change 'default 0' to 'default 6' - in this
    case - to select the latest kernel explicitly via the GRUB
    screen.

    --
    Maurice
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)


  11. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 16:07:40 +0000, Maurice Batey wrote:
    >
    > But I prefer to change 'default 0' to 'default 6' - in this
    > case - to select the latest kernel explicitly via the GRUB
    > screen.


    Then you get to modify default again on the next update.

    What you can do is add a Last_kernel stanza using links.
    That way you change links in /boot and have a fallback selection and
    do not need to keep playing in menu.lst

  12. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 16:11:25 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > Then you get to modify default again on the next update.


    Indeed, but it means I don't get switched to a new kernel
    until *I* say so.

    --
    Maurice
    (Remove 'removethis.' to reply by email)


  13. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Peter D. wrote:
    >
    > You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.
    >
    > While the first three sections stay the same an increase in the
    > fourth means more bug fixes. Unless there has been a major
    > stuff-up you will always want to use the kernel with the most
    > bug fixes.
    >
    > Because the kernel is critical to the system as a whole it does
    > not get replaced, a new one is installed alongside the old one
    > so that you can go back.
    >
    > There should be a link in /boot with a generic name that points
    > to the most recent kernel. Type "ls -l /boot/kernel*" in a terminal
    > to see. So if you just let the system do its thing when it reboots
    > it should use the latest kernel, "uname -a" to check.
    >
    > Changing kernels is one of the few times that you need to reboot.
    >
    >

    So how long before one should feel confident that it's OK to dump - uh,
    uninstall - one or more of the old kernels? They're beginning to stack
    up like cordwood over here.

    TJ

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  14. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    On 2007-11-30, TJ wrote:
    > Peter D. wrote:
    >>
    >> You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.
    >>
    >> While the first three sections stay the same an increase in the
    >> fourth means more bug fixes. Unless there has been a major
    >> stuff-up you will always want to use the kernel with the most
    >> bug fixes.
    >>
    >> Because the kernel is critical to the system as a whole it does
    >> not get replaced, a new one is installed alongside the old one
    >> so that you can go back.
    >>
    >> There should be a link in /boot with a generic name that points
    >> to the most recent kernel. Type "ls -l /boot/kernel*" in a terminal
    >> to see. So if you just let the system do its thing when it reboots
    >> it should use the latest kernel, "uname -a" to check.
    >>
    >> Changing kernels is one of the few times that you need to reboot.
    >>
    >>

    > So how long before one should feel confident that it's OK to dump - uh,
    > uninstall - one or more of the old kernels? They're beginning to stack
    > up like cordwood over here.


    I always keep _ALL_ distribution-supplied kernels around,
    except for maybe the test kernels that didn't work out while
    trying to solve a kernel bug.

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  15. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    TJ writes:

    >Peter D. wrote:
    >>
    >> You should not be using either. the current version is 2.6.22.12.
    >>
    >> While the first three sections stay the same an increase in the
    >> fourth means more bug fixes. Unless there has been a major
    >> stuff-up you will always want to use the kernel with the most
    >> bug fixes.
    >>
    >> Because the kernel is critical to the system as a whole it does
    >> not get replaced, a new one is installed alongside the old one
    >> so that you can go back.
    >>
    >> There should be a link in /boot with a generic name that points
    >> to the most recent kernel. Type "ls -l /boot/kernel*" in a terminal
    >> to see. So if you just let the system do its thing when it reboots
    >> it should use the latest kernel, "uname -a" to check.
    >>
    >> Changing kernels is one of the few times that you need to reboot.
    >>
    >>

    >So how long before one should feel confident that it's OK to dump - uh,
    >uninstall - one or more of the old kernels? They're beginning to stack
    >up like cordwood over here.



    When you stop using them. If you never use them, get rid of them. They are
    there as a fallback only if your current kernel is a complete disaster, and
    for example you find yourself unable to boot at all ( because the new
    kernel does not contain your file system type driver for example.)

    Certainly there is no need to keep more than one backup, unless there is
    reason you actually use more than one.



  16. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Peter D. wrote:
    > Wait a day and try again.


    Yeah.

    >> I did find a multimedia 2.6.23.0-rc8 kernel. Does anyone know how
    >> well this one works?

    >
    > Where did you find it?


    ftp://ftp.gtlib.cc.gatech.edu/pub/ma...a/main/release
    All other repositories for 2008.0 were on the same server, excluding
    plf which is not available on servers in the U.S.

    > [A]n up-to-date multimedia kernel would be nice.
    >
    > Unless you have a reason for using a different kernel, don't.


    Reason 1: Low latency kernel. Real reasons 2-..: I like to see if
    there is any obvious reason I should change. Sometimes I come up
    with a kernel that just seems to work better.
    >
    >> 2008.0 plus updates replaced the gcc compiler 4.1 with 4.2.2, and
    >> the nVidia requirement that both kernel and drivers be compiled with
    >> the same compiler mean I have to recompile all 2007.1 kernels

    >
    > Are you using 2008.0 or 2007.1? Mixing and matching bits and pieces
    > can be made to work, but I don't recommend it. Go to a pure 2008.0
    > system and let Mandriva do the compilation.


    Thanks but no thanks. I did an upgrade rather than a clean install,
    and I am getting freeze-ups now and then. It seems to happen when I
    have been running simultaneously amarok, Thunderbird, and Firefox for
    an hour and a half to two and a half hours, with Thunderbird freezing
    first (if I remember correctly). By the time Thunderbird freezes or
    amarok dies, KDE is frozen and the mouse will not move. The usual
    Ctl-Alt-BS, Alt-Ctl-F2, Alt-Sysreq-r, Alt-Sysreq-s, Alt-Sysreq-i,
    and Alt-Sysreq-u have no visible effect. Alt-Sysreq-b will reboot
    the machine. This happens for both the 2.6.22.9-desktop-1mdv
    and 2.6.22.9-desktop-2mdv kernels.

    I currently am using an old compiled kernel (2.6.17-15mdvcustom)
    simply because it was easy to compile and compile nVidia drivers for.
    to see if I get the freeze ups under similar conditions with an old
    reliable kernel.

    Additionally, there are a bunch of packages on my system not replaced
    when 2008 was installed, because replacements are not available.
    They still work, so I am keeping them. Beyond that, when I set up my
    mirrors and looked at available software and searched for kernels,
    the mirrors show several 2007.1 kernels (and a bunch of 2007.1
    packages) as available even though my system does not have them. So,
    my assumption is that the 2007.1 kernels should be quite compatible,
    or they would not be included in the 2008.0 repository.

    > What is wrong with the standard (Mandriva) kernel?


    It is freezing up now and then .

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  17. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Oops. That should be Firefox freezing first, and then maybe
    Thunderbird or maybe Amarok. When either of the latter is frozen,
    the mouse freezes, KDE is paralyzed, and the Ctl- and Slt-Sys-.
    sequences appear to do nothing except for Alt-Sys-b which does
    reboot the system.

    Jim Beard wrote:
    > Peter D. wrote:
    >> Wait a day and try again.

    >
    > Yeah.
    >
    >>> I did find a multimedia 2.6.23.0-rc8 kernel. Does anyone know how
    >>> well this one works?

    >>
    >> Where did you find it?

    >
    > ftp://ftp.gtlib.cc.gatech.edu/pub/ma...a/main/release
    >
    > All other repositories for 2008.0 were on the same server, excluding plf
    > which is not available on servers in the U.S.
    >
    > > [A]n up-to-date multimedia kernel would be nice.
    >>
    >> Unless you have a reason for using a different kernel, don't.

    >
    > Reason 1: Low latency kernel. Real reasons 2-..: I like to see if
    > there is any obvious reason I should change. Sometimes I come up
    > with a kernel that just seems to work better.
    >>
    >>> 2008.0 plus updates replaced the gcc compiler 4.1 with 4.2.2, and
    >>> the nVidia requirement that both kernel and drivers be compiled with
    >>> the same compiler mean I have to recompile all 2007.1 kernels

    >>
    >> Are you using 2008.0 or 2007.1? Mixing and matching bits and pieces
    >> can be made to work, but I don't recommend it. Go to a pure 2008.0
    >> system and let Mandriva do the compilation.

    >
    > Thanks but no thanks. I did an upgrade rather than a clean install, and
    > I am getting freeze-ups now and then. It seems to happen when I
    > have been running simultaneously amarok, Thunderbird, and Firefox for
    > an hour and a half to two and a half hours, with Thunderbird freezing
    > first (if I remember correctly). By the time Thunderbird freezes or
    > amarok dies, KDE is frozen and the mouse will not move. The usual
    > Ctl-Alt-BS, Alt-Ctl-F2, Alt-Sysreq-r, Alt-Sysreq-s, Alt-Sysreq-i,
    > and Alt-Sysreq-u have no visible effect. Alt-Sysreq-b will reboot
    > the machine. This happens for both the 2.6.22.9-desktop-1mdv
    > and 2.6.22.9-desktop-2mdv kernels.
    >
    > I currently am using an old compiled kernel (2.6.17-15mdvcustom) simply
    > because it was easy to compile and compile nVidia drivers for.
    > to see if I get the freeze ups under similar conditions with an old
    > reliable kernel.
    >
    > Additionally, there are a bunch of packages on my system not replaced
    > when 2008 was installed, because replacements are not available. They
    > still work, so I am keeping them. Beyond that, when I set up my
    > mirrors and looked at available software and searched for kernels,
    > the mirrors show several 2007.1 kernels (and a bunch of 2007.1 packages)
    > as available even though my system does not have them. So, my
    > assumption is that the 2007.1 kernels should be quite compatible,
    > or they would not be included in the 2008.0 repository.
    >
    >> What is wrong with the standard (Mandriva) kernel?

    >
    > It is freezing up now and then .
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >



    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  18. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    Jim Beard wrote:
    > Oops. That should be Firefox freezing first, and then maybe
    > Thunderbird or maybe Amarok. When either of the latter is frozen,
    > the mouse freezes, KDE is paralyzed, and the Ctl- and Slt-Sys-.
    > sequences appear to do nothing except for Alt-Sys-b which does
    > reboot the system.
    >

    I don't have a 64-bit system, and I don't pretend to know much about
    what I'm saying, but all the advice I've heard in using Linux for the
    last 5 1/2 years has been that it is almost always better to do a clean
    install than to update an old system. The reason usually given is that
    hybridized systems like the one you're describing are prone to just this
    sort of problem.

    Thank you for confirming what others have been telling me all this time.
    It makes me glad I followed their advice.

    TJ

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  19. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    TJ wrote:
    > Jim Beard wrote:
    >> Oops. That should be Firefox freezing first, and then maybe
    >> Thunderbird or maybe Amarok. When either of the latter is frozen,
    >> the mouse freezes, KDE is paralyzed, and the Ctl- and Slt-Sys-.
    >> sequences appear to do nothing except for Alt-Sys-b which does
    >> reboot the system.
    >>

    > I don't have a 64-bit system, and I don't pretend to know much about
    > what I'm saying, but all the advice I've heard in using Linux for the
    > last 5 1/2 years has been that it is almost always better to do a clean
    > install than to update an old system. The reason usually given is that
    > hybridized systems like the one you're describing are prone to just this
    > sort of problem.


    Yes, there are (not can be, will be) problems with old system
    software lying around and being used when it should not be. But
    I tinker with my system a lot, and I have the choice of doing a
    clean install and spending lots of time tinker with things to make
    them work the way I like, or doing an upgrade and spending time
    making thing work. Which approach I take depends on my mood when
    I install the new version.

    Mandriva in times past has advertised that it puts great effort
    into supporting the upgrade approach (often needed or desired
    by those accustomed to a non-UNIX-based OS), so I don't feel too
    bad about trying to go the upgrade route and then asking for
    help when something does not work.

    My _upgrade_ to 2007.1 went so smoothly I grabbed a PowerPack
    verson of 2008.0 as soon as it was available on DVD and tried for
    a repeat. It has not gone as smoothly this time, but I am not
    yet inclined to scrub the partitions for / /usr /var /swap and do
    the clean install. Note that even that will leave stuff in /home
    that may need to be cleaned up. The full routine means backing up
    everyting in /home (done, as a matter of routine), scrubing that
    partition, and then restoring from backup only those things needed.

    > Thank you for confirming what others have been telling me all this time.
    > It makes me glad I followed their advice.


    My advice too is to do the clean install. But I do not hold my
    advice in such high esteem that I will not ignore it when
    circumstances suggest something else might be a good idea.

    YPYM, YTYP. And if you have to ask, the answer is no.

    Cheers!

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  20. Re: Which new kernel to use?

    on Saturday 01 December 2007 14:07
    in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva
    Jim Beard wrote:

    > Peter D. wrote:
    >> Wait a day and try again.

    >
    > Yeah.
    >
    >>> I did find a multimedia 2.6.23.0-rc8 kernel. Does anyone know how
    >>> well this one works?

    >>
    >> Where did you find it?

    >
    >

    ftp://ftp.gtlib.cc.gatech.edu/pub/ma...a/main/release
    > All other repositories for 2008.0 were on the same server, excluding
    > plf which is not available on servers in the U.S.


    It looks like a Mandriva kernel, so I guess it won't cause you too much
    grief, but you are pretty much on your own with anything other than the
    recommended kernel.

    > > [A]n up-to-date multimedia kernel would be nice.
    >>
    >> Unless you have a reason for using a different kernel, don't.

    >
    > Reason 1: Low latency kernel.


    Can you really see the difference?

    > Real reasons 2-..: I like to see if
    > there is any obvious reason I should change. Sometimes I come up
    > with a kernel that just seems to work better.


    If you just want to play, I have no objections whatsoever.

    >>> 2008.0 plus updates replaced the gcc compiler 4.1 with 4.2.2, and
    >>> the nVidia requirement that both kernel and drivers be compiled with
    >>> the same compiler mean I have to recompile all 2007.1 kernels

    >>
    >> Are you using 2008.0 or 2007.1? Mixing and matching bits and pieces
    >> can be made to work, but I don't recommend it. Go to a pure 2008.0
    >> system and let Mandriva do the compilation.

    >
    > Thanks but no thanks. I did an upgrade rather than a clean install,
    > and I am getting freeze-ups now and then. It seems to happen when I
    > have been running simultaneously amarok, Thunderbird, and Firefox for
    > an hour and a half to two and a half hours, with Thunderbird freezing
    > first (if I remember correctly). By the time Thunderbird freezes or
    > amarok dies, KDE is frozen and the mouse will not move. The usual
    > Ctl-Alt-BS, Alt-Ctl-F2, Alt-Sysreq-r, Alt-Sysreq-s, Alt-Sysreq-i,
    > and Alt-Sysreq-u have no visible effect. Alt-Sysreq-b will reboot
    > the machine. This happens for both the 2.6.22.9-desktop-1mdv
    > and 2.6.22.9-desktop-2mdv kernels.
    >
    > I currently am using an old compiled kernel (2.6.17-15mdvcustom)
    > simply because it was easy to compile and compile nVidia drivers for.
    > to see if I get the freeze ups under similar conditions with an old
    > reliable kernel.


    It is possible that bits of 2008.0 demand something newer than 2.6.17.

    > Additionally, there are a bunch of packages on my system not replaced
    > when 2008 was installed, because replacements are not available.
    > They still work, so I am keeping them. Beyond that, when I set up my
    > mirrors and looked at available software and searched for kernels,
    > the mirrors show several 2007.1 kernels (and a bunch of 2007.1
    > packages) as available even though my system does not have them. So,
    > my assumption is that the 2007.1 kernels should be quite compatible,
    > or they would not be included in the 2008.0 repository.


    Surly the 2007.1 kernels are in the 2007.1 repositories, not 2008.0.

    >> What is wrong with the standard (Mandriva) kernel?

    >
    > It is freezing up now and then .
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > jim b.
    >


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

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