Broadband Security - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Broadband Security - Mandriva ; Moe Trin wrote: > Your trim nearly changed the context there. Kiri was turned in by her > former owner who apparently couldn't afford the vet bills. The Humane > Society patched her up, and we got her as a ...

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Thread: Broadband Security

  1. Re: [OT] Broadband Security

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > Your trim nearly changed the context there. Kiri was turned in by her
    > former owner who apparently couldn't afford the vet bills. The Humane
    > Society patched her up, and we got her as a "second chance kitty".
    > Sandy's owner died, and the poor guy was seven year old so no one wanted
    > him. Good Sam and Smokie were both picked up off the streets without
    > collars or embedded tags. So in all cases, the cats _were_ recycled.


    I handle online correspondence for my parents' cats. Allegra actually
    logged me off CompuServe once, by standing on Ctrl and C until CI$ got
    so many ctrl-c's that they disconnected me.

    >>> Kiri is a Siamese named after an opera singer

    >> I have a recording of WEST SIDE STORY with her.

    > I'll stick with the original Broadway cast TYVM.


    Me too. I have a lot of OBC albums.

    >> I'm not a big fan of opera, though. The last time I went to the opera,
    >> I fell asleep. So did the main character.


    Btw it was Bellini's "La Sonnambula," so the main character really was
    asleep onstage.

    > Then there are the unusual voices - Pearl Bailey in "Porgy and Bess", or
    > Juanita Hall in "South Pacific" (her "Bali Hai" still makes me stop and
    > turn up the volume).


    Juanita Hall is heard on the OBC album. She's *seen* in the movie but
    her singing is dubbed!

    Adam

  2. Re: Broadband Security

    Moe Trin wrote:
    [CAT5E]
    >> Is there a "best" way to coil it up, or otherwise keep the excess out
    >> of everyone's way? Can I just put it in a coil a foot across and tie it
    >> with a twist tie, or is there some recommended way to keep from
    >> distorting the signal?

    >
    > That probably would be satisfactory.


    Thanks. I'll put it under my desk where it will get lost among all the
    other cables that live there. Obviously I asked for a cable that was
    longer than I needed, but I figured that a cable that was too long was
    only a small problem, but a cable that was too short was a BIG problem.

    >> maybe a new scanner that can handle 35mm negatives
    >> in strips and mounted slides

    >
    > Doing away with film?


    No, but I don't know how to do color darkroom work. In fact, I just
    finished "Black and White Photography I" at the local community college,
    with real film (Tri-X) and real chemicals. I've had years of shooting
    film, but no previous darkroom experience. My 35mm SLR is so old that
    the shutter is mechanical.

    >> and getting W2K in a VM under VMWare (haven't even looked at that one
    >> yet).

    >
    > Can't help there - win3.1 was the last version I used.


    I can handle W2K; it's VMware that I haven't looked at yet. The
    documentation alone is several megabytes of PDF files.

    Adam


  3. Re: Broadband Security

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 02:56:32 GMT, Adam wrote:

    > Let me put my question another way: If someone knowledgeable were to
    > take over as sysadmin of my system, where would be the first few places
    > they would look for results from the night's cron jobs?


    I am going to let you finish chapter 35 and let you decide. Mainly
    because I am not happy with your mind set and the question is
    application dependent.

    All though it is part of the admins job to check log files, I think
    you should consider letting root have a life. You have decided to
    write a cron job that you feel is important. Why not go the extra step
    and make the script check the log, and if there is something for root
    to look at, mail root the log file, or it's location. If there is
    nothing new in the log, do not bother root and delete it.


    > My system does NOT run 24/7. Mainly, it's turned off when I'm not home.
    > I hate to think of powering it up and suddenly having everything slow
    > to a crawl.


    Heheheh, I switched my granny aged neighbor to linux. Problem is, she
    is on dial up and like you, does not leave it on 24/7. Big update came out
    and I offered to use my cable connection to do the update.

    I took the system back, had her power up and verify nothing was broke
    in her account. After about 2 minutes she exclaimed "What did you do,
    grease the software or what".

    She has a gig of memory on a AMD 2400 MHz cpu.

    I asked why, and she said it was not this fast before I took it.
    Batch jobs fired up by anacron would make her system sluggish for the
    first 20 minutes of use.

    > I can't see any easy way around this, though.


    Hmmm, considering your thought,
    Please read the last four lines of this reply, I'll wait, . . . . . . . . .

    You could munge a copy of /etc/crontab and set run times to something
    in the next +10 minutes or half hour and does a
    poweroff as the last job. All you do is turn off the monitor.

    Now when you logout, your ~/bash_logout triggers your script to munge
    crontab, cron jobs run and powers off the system.
    On next day's boot, anacron should not find someting to do unless you
    login after yesterdays logout.

    Just a caution, the devil is in the details.
    Example: you login 2 hours later.

    --
    The warranty and liability expired as you read this message.
    If the above breaks your system, it's yours and you keep both pieces.
    Practice safe computing. Backup the file before you change it.
    Do a, man command_here or cat command_here, before using it.

  4. Re: Broadband Security

    Bit Twister wrote:
    > I am going to let you finish chapter 35 and let you decide. Mainly
    > because I am not happy with your mind set and the question is
    > application dependent.


    By "mind set" do you mean all my "Dear me, what should I do now?" posts?
    You have a point. I'm not used to thinking of myself as a sysadmin --
    I'm used to someone else saying "This is how we do things." Anyway I
    looked through chapter 35, and it did answer my question. I'll put the
    output files from my security scripts in a subdirectory under /var/log.

    > Why not go the extra step
    > and make the script check the log, and if there is something for root
    > to look at, mail root the log file, or it's location. If there is
    > nothing new in the log, do not bother root and delete it.


    That sounds good! I can picture something like:

    /sbin/filecheck > filecheck.output
    grep "errors found" filecheck.output > filecheck.errors
    if [ -s filecheck.errors ]
    {code continues}

    or:

    /sbin/filecheck > filecheck.output
    case "$?" in
    {code continues}

    where /sbin/filecheck is some hypothetical security program.

    >> My system does NOT run 24/7. Mainly, it's turned off when I'm not home.
    >> I hate to think of powering it up and suddenly having everything slow
    >> to a crawl.

    >
    > Hmmm, considering your thought,
    > Please read the last four lines of this reply, I'll wait, . . . . . . . . .


    Okay, now that I have to bear the full responsibility of a sysadmin :-)
    I have considered the problem and come up with a solution. My system is
    /usually/ on all night, and off during the day when I'm away. So if I
    have anacron scheduled to run all those resource-intensive chores at 4
    AM, most of the time I won't be affected -- only once in a while. That
    sounds tolerable, and I can always change it later if I find anything
    better. Thanks again for your guidance on this!

    Adam

  5. Re: Broadband Security

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 01:38:26 GMT, Adam wrote:
    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    > By "mind set" do you mean all my "Dear me, what should I do now?" posts?


    No, you seemed to be on the track to have root go looking at logs
    created by your scripts.


    > That sounds good! I can picture something like:
    >
    > /sbin/filecheck > filecheck.output
    > grep "errors found" filecheck.output > filecheck.errors


    or
    /sbin/filecheck > $TMP/filecheck.output
    _count=$(grep -c "errors found" $TMP/filecheck.output)

    if [ "_count" - gt 0 ] ; then
    {tell root}
    fi
    or:

    /sbin/filecheck > $TMP/filecheck.output
    if [ "$?" -ne 0 ] then
    {tell root}
    fi

    > Okay, now that I have to bear the full responsibility of a sysadmin :-)
    > I have considered the problem and come up with a solution. My system is
    > /usually/ on all night, and off during the day when I'm away. So if I
    > have anacron scheduled to run all those resource-intensive chores at 4
    > AM, most of the time I won't be affected


    or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    when they get through.

  6. Re: Broadband Security

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >> For non-24/7 systems, there are at least two replacements - anacron
    >> and fcron (there may be more). [...] On a 24/7 system, these jobs
    >> run at 0:dark:30 when no one is likely to be using the system -
    >> simply because they are enormous resource hogs, even when nice'd down
    >> to a +19. On a non-24/7 system, these jobs are run a few minutes
    >> after power-on, and you can see the systems come to a standstill

    >
    >My system will NOT be on 24/7, but I don't want it that sluggish after
    >every power-up.


    You'll have to look at what cron is doing. The default setup generally
    is running 'makewhatis' and 'updatedb' as major recourse hogs, log
    maintenance, and a crude security check (mainly looking at permissions
    and/or ownership issues).

    "updatedb" is the biggy, as it searches for every file on the system,
    and shorts the names into a parable database. On my primary workstation
    at home, that's over 41000 files, and finding those is going to take a
    lot of time. The tradeoff is how fresh the database is that 'locate'
    is going to use. There are tricks you can do, such as creating multiple
    databases - one with the system files (that won't be changing all the
    time) and another that only indexes what is in your home directory and
    below. That would give you some programming experience!

    'makewhatis' is another hog. A question - do you need it updated daily,
    or would a longer interval (weekly, monthly, or on demand) be
    acceptable? How often are you adding/deleting/renaming man pages?

    Log maintenance? Depends on how much logging you are doing. and how
    you've set up the log-rotation program. The security nanny? I don't
    have one (I'll admin my own systems TYVM, and I know how I want the
    boxes set up and so on).

    What else have you got running? 'crontab -l | wc -l' only has about a
    dozen entries. The system crontab (/etc/crontab) has about 25 entries,
    and that doesn't include the jobs that 'run-parts' is going to run
    hourly/daily/weekly/monthly (/etc/crond.*). There are also crontabs for
    other users in /var/spool/crontab/.

    >I don't really see any way around that.


    Can you control the power-off via software? If yes, create a shutdown
    task that runs the cron-jobs, and then runs the real shutdown command.
    Do NOT put this a a runlevel task, as init does not wait for things to
    finish when it's running the runlevel scripts.

    >OTOH my system is usually on all night, so maybe I could get anacron
    >to run them at 4 AM if it's on.


    I don't use anacron, but my understanding is that anacron only runs jobs
    a specified amount of time after power on, and it doesn't know anything
    about wall-clock time
    I don't use anacron, but my understanding is that anacron only runs jobs
    a specified amount of time after power on, and it doesn't know anything
    about wall-clock time. I'd normally use the regular cron daemon for tasks
    that need to be done _during_ the day - but you may also be able to use
    'at'

    [compton ~]$ whatis at atd
    at (1) - queue, examine or delete jobs for later execution
    atd (8) - run jobs queued for later execution
    [compton ~]$

    >I'll have to get used to making sysadmin-type decisions!


    Have you looked at "The Linux System Administrators' Guide" from the LDP?

    Old guy

  7. Re: [OT] Broadband Security

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >So in all cases, the cats _were_ recycled.
    >
    >I handle online correspondence for my parents' cats. Allegra actually
    >logged me off CompuServe once, by standing on Ctrl and C until CI$ got
    >so many ctrl-c's that they disconnected me.


    Smokie likes a window seat a few feet from the computer. I have to use
    guile when logging in, lest she shoulder-surf the username/password. I
    liked the original IBM PC-AT case with key lock, We kept the key
    inserted so that when the cat decided to walk this way, a quick turn
    and the keyboard is inop. With modern cases lacking this feature, I've
    got to use mouse to position the cursor over a "dead" terminal to get
    the same effect.

    >> Juanita Hall in "South Pacific" (her "Bali Hai" still makes me stop and
    >> turn up the volume).

    >
    >Juanita Hall is heard on the OBC album. She's *seen* in the movie but
    >her singing is dubbed!


    I was disappointed with the movie - the "special effects" with the strange
    color sequences didn't do it for me.

    Old guy
    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >So in all cases, the cats _were_ recycled.
    >
    >I handle online correspondence for my parents' cats. Allegra actually
    >logged me off CompuServe once, by standing on Ctrl and C until CI$ got
    >so many ctrl-c's that they disconnected me.


    Smokie likes a window seat a few feet from the computer. I have to use
    guile when logging in, lest she shoulder-surf the username/password. I
    liked the original IBM PC-AT case with key lock, We kept the key
    inserted so that when the cat decided to walk this way, a quick turn
    and the keyboard is inop. With modern cases lacking this feature, I've
    got to use mouse to position the cursor over a "dead" terminal to get
    the same effect.

    >> Juanita Hall in "South Pacific" (her "Bali Hai" still makes me stop and
    >> turn up the volume).

    >
    >Juanita Hall is heard on the OBC album. She's *seen* in the movie but
    >her singing is dubbed!


    I was disappointed with the movie - the "special effects" with the strange
    color sequences didn't do it for me.

    Old guy

  8. Re: Broadband Security

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Adam wrote:

    >Moe Trin wrote:


    >[CAT5E]


    >Thanks. I'll put it under my desk where it will get lost among all the
    >other cables that live there.


    Normally, we use the system-administrator's universal tool (duct tape)
    to secure the coil to the bottom of the desk. Keeps it from getting foot
    damage, and helps avoid a rat's nest and the janitors.

    >> Doing away with film?

    >
    >No, but I don't know how to do color darkroom work. In fact, I just
    >finished "Black and White Photography I" at the local community college,
    >with real film (Tri-X) and real chemicals.


    Not sure who was running it, but the base Hobby shop at the three Air
    Farce Bases I served at in Europe way back when had training classes.
    Tri-X and Pan-X were essentially free, and we used to burn through that
    as if it were water. Paper on the other hand, you had to buy at the PX,
    though the chemicals for developing as well as enlargers and such were
    provided for "members". Color was generally limited to slides, and
    we had to buy the film. The hobby shop was limited to process E
    which was regular Ektachrome. Can't remember if the cardboard slide
    holders were "at cost" or at some subsidized rate.

    >I've had years of shooting film, but no previous darkroom experience.
    >My 35mm SLR is so old that the shutter is mechanical.


    My Edixa is from 1959 - the Minolta and Yashika are from 1965 or so.
    My niece stole my Nikon F2 setup (she has used it semi-professionally
    so I'm not complaining to much). I think I bought the Nikons in 1970
    while I was working at the MSDF in Kure.

    >I can handle W2K; it's VMware that I haven't looked at yet. The
    >documentation alone is several megabytes of PDF files.


    Again, I never had any reason to run VMware - if we are going to need
    a virtual system for testing some scary process, there are a dozen
    boxes in the lab that are used as victims. If they get trashed, it's
    no big deal to wipe and reinstall. They're normally on a sandbox
    network anyway.

    Old guy

  9. Re: Broadband Security

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > The tradeoff is how fresh the database is that 'locate'
    > is going to use. There are tricks you can do, such as creating multiple
    > databases - one with the system files (that won't be changing all the
    > time) and another that only indexes what is in your home directory and
    > below. That would give you some programming experience!


    I used to be fairly good at programming. I once wrote an EXEC for
    VM/CMS that allowed access to Mode 0 files on a read-only minidisk.

    > I don't use anacron, but my understanding is that anacron only runs jobs
    > a specified amount of time after power on, and it doesn't know anything
    > about wall-clock time.


    You're right about anacron. I think I can put something together using
    cron, anacron, at, and the timestamps in /var/spool/anacron/cron.* that
    will run jobs at 4 AM if possible, otherwise soon after next powerup.

    > Have you looked at "The Linux System Administrators' Guide" from the LDP?


    Not yet, but I've downloaded it and will look at it. Thanks!

    Adam

  10. Re: Broadband Security

    Bit Twister wrote:
    > No, you seemed to be on the track to have root go looking at logs
    > created by your scripts.


    You're right. I'd sort of been imagining spending two or three minutes
    each morning looking over the logs. That was before I really looked at
    /var/log and saw the size of those things! I am definitely going to
    need scripts to look over those and my new logs, to alert me if
    anything's wrong or maybe give me a one-line "everything's okay."

    >> Okay, now that I have to bear the full responsibility of a sysadmin :-)
    >> I have considered the problem and come up with a solution. My system is
    >> /usually/ on all night, and off during the day when I'm away. So if I
    >> have anacron scheduled to run all those resource-intensive chores at 4
    >> AM, most of the time I won't be affected

    >
    > or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    > when they get through.


    I think what I'll end up using is some combination of cron, anacron, at,
    and the timestamps in /var/spool/anacron/cron.* . I'll have to work out
    the details.

    Adam

  11. Re: [OT] Broadband Security

    Moe Trin wrote:
    >>> Juanita Hall in "South Pacific" (her "Bali Hai" still makes me stop and
    >>> turn up the volume).

    >> Juanita Hall is heard on the OBC album. She's *seen* in the movie but
    >> her singing is dubbed!

    >
    > I was disappointed with the movie - the "special effects" with the strange
    > color sequences didn't do it for me.


    I've heard about the colors in that movie -- never seen it (or a stage
    production), just read the script and heard the OBC album. There's a
    local theater that shows a classic film (35 mm, big screen) most months,
    so maybe it will come around to there.

    Adam

  12. Re: [OT] Broadband Security

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > Normally, we use the system-administrator's universal tool (duct tape)
    > to secure the coil to the bottom of the desk. Keeps it from getting foot
    > damage, and helps avoid a rat's nest and the janitors.


    If it moves and it's not supposed to, use duct tape. If it's supposed
    to move and doesn't, use WD-40.

    > the base Hobby shop at the three Air Farce Bases I served at in
    > Europe way back [...] The hobby shop was limited to process E
    > which was regular Ektachrome. Can't remember if the cardboard slide
    > holders were "at cost" or at some subsidized rate.


    Recently I was looking over some of my father's slides from 1959-1961.
    Most of the Ektachromes had turned into monochrome, various shades of
    rust-brown. On a few of them, it was possible to guess at what the
    original colors had been. All the Kodachromes still looked great. This
    is all on film bought at retail, and processed by Kodak. Btw did you
    know that there are only two places left in the entire world that
    process Kodachrome? Neither is owned or run by Kodak. One is in Japan,
    and the other is Dwayne's Photo of Parsons, KS.

    > My Edixa is from 1959 - the Minolta and Yashika are from 1965 or so.
    > My niece stole my Nikon F2 setup (she has used it semi-professionally
    > so I'm not complaining to much). I think I bought the Nikons in 1970
    > while I was working at the MSDF in Kure.


    My Canon TX (bottom of the line of which the F-1 was the top) was bought
    in 1976 and given to me in 1977. For class, I shot one roll with an
    Argus C3 ("brick"), and now I understand why so many people traded it in.

    > Again, I never had any reason to run VMware - if we are going to need
    > a virtual system for testing some scary process, there are a dozen
    > boxes in the lab that are used as victims.


    I don't *need* to run VMware, it just sounds like a fun project. When I
    get around to it!

    Adam

  13. Re: Broadband Security

    On 2007-06-20, Bit Twister wrote:
    >
    > or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    > when they get through.


    There's an unfortunate side effect of that time if you
    happen to live in the USA or any similarly foolish country.
    Once a year, the jobs won't run.

    When changing from standard time to daylight saving time,
    jobs set to start between 2am and 3am won't run. If my
    calculations are correct, when changing from daylight saving
    time to standard time, jobs set to start between 1am and 2am
    will probably run twice. If you're picky about your jobs
    running exactly once each and every night with no
    exceptions, it's probably best to avoid starting times
    between 1am and 3am.

    I want to know who gave permission to the politicians to
    mess around with the clocks! :-(

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  14. Re: Broadband Security

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 14:28:22 -0400, Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:

    > There's an unfortunate side effect of that time if you
    > happen to live in the USA or any similarly foolish country.
    > Once a year, the jobs won't run.


    That's not correct, as far as I know. See ...
    http://docs.hp.com/en/B9106-90008/cron.1M.html

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  15. Re: Broadband Security

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 18:28:22 GMT, Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:
    > On 2007-06-20, Bit Twister wrote:
    >>
    >> or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    >> when they get through.

    >
    > There's an unfortunate side effect of that time if you
    > happen to live in the USA or any similarly foolish country.
    > Once a year, the jobs won't run.
    >
    > When changing from standard time to daylight saving time,
    > jobs set to start between 2am and 3am won't run.


    Hmmm, that is why I picked 5 after 2am. If we spring/fall back at 2am
    I would have thought the
    05 2 * * * root nice -n 19 run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily
    job would only run once.

    After I modify crontab, cron would read /etc/cron and load the 02:05
    entry into memory and only start execution at 02:05.

    Now, had I picked 2am, then I can agree with you about double/no runs.

  16. Re: Broadband Security

    On 2007-06-20, David W. Hodgins wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 14:28:22 -0400, Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:
    >
    >> There's an unfortunate side effect of that time if you
    >> happen to live in the USA or any similarly foolish country.
    >> Once a year, the jobs won't run.

    >
    > That's not correct, as far as I know. See ...
    > http://docs.hp.com/en/B9106-90008/cron.1M.html


    In HPUX, cron may very well take care of it as described
    there. However, last I checked this was
    alt.os.linux.mandriva, not an HPUX newsgroup. I used to
    have root's crontab start daily backups at 2:35am, and it
    definitely _DID_ fail to run the cron job when springing
    ahead. (I now start them at 12:35am to avoid the problem.)

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  17. Re: Broadband Security

    On 2007-06-20, Bit Twister wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 18:28:22 GMT, Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:
    >> On 2007-06-20, Bit Twister wrote:
    >>>
    >>> or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    >>> when they get through.

    >>
    >> There's an unfortunate side effect of that time if you
    >> happen to live in the USA or any similarly foolish country.
    >> Once a year, the jobs won't run.
    >>
    >> When changing from standard time to daylight saving time,
    >> jobs set to start between 2am and 3am won't run.

    >
    > Hmmm, that is why I picked 5 after 2am. If we spring/fall back at 2am
    > I would have thought the
    > 05 2 * * * root nice -n 19 run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily
    > job would only run once.
    >
    > After I modify crontab, cron would read /etc/cron and load the 02:05
    > entry into memory and only start execution at 02:05.
    >
    > Now, had I picked 2am, then I can agree with you about double/no runs.


    As I informed the other poster, my daily backups used to be
    set in root's crontab to start at 2:35am, and they
    definitely did _NOT_ run on the spring-ahead morning. (I
    now start them at 12:35am.)

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  18. Re: Broadband Security

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 16:20:30 -0400, Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:

    > In HPUX, cron may very well take care of it as described
    > there. However, last I checked this was
    > alt.os.linux.mandriva, not an HPUX newsgroup. I used to
    > have root's crontab start daily backups at 2:35am, and it
    > definitely _DID_ fail to run the cron job when springing
    > ahead. (I now start them at 12:35am to avoid the problem.)


    I just picked the first entry from a google search on "cron daylight savings".
    Man cron, on Mandriva 2007.1 says the same thing.

    I've checked bugzilla, and there are no bugs reported, for
    cron failing to run, or running duplicate jobs, on a change
    in the setting of daylight savings time.

    I'll take your word for, it, that reaility is not the same as
    the man page. I'll test this later, and if I can confirm it,
    I'll file a report on bugzilla.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  19. Re: Broadband Security - cron/anacron conflict resolved

    Adam wrote:
    >>> So if I have anacron scheduled to run all those
    >>> resource-intensive chores at 4 AM, most of the time I won't be affected

    >>
    >> or move them to 5 minutes after 2am. So your system could be shutdown
    >> when they get through.


    Wow, discussions move fast here!

    Like so many things, Daylight Savings Time was thought up by Benjamin
    Franklin. For more info on United States practice, see
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History..._United_States .

    Setting a job for 2:05 AM wouldn't work either, as it wouldn't be run on
    the day DST starts and clocks go from 1:59:59 AM to 3:00:00 AM.

    I finally RTFM and found in /usr/share/doc/anacron-2.3/README (from
    Mandriva 2007):

    > In addition to running Anacron from the boot-scripts, it is also
    > recommended to schedule it as a daily cron-job (usually at an early
    > morning hour), so that if the machine is kept running for a night,
    > jobs for the next day will still be executed.


    This makes things a LOT easier. All I have to do is schedule anacron to
    run both at startup and during the night (either before 1 AM or on/after
    3 AM). Then if my system's on during the night, the anacron jobs will
    be run during the night. If I restart my system later the same day,
    anacron will run as part of startup and see that the jobs have already
    been done that day. If my system isn't on all night, then all the
    anacron jobs will be run at the next startup, leaving me with a sluggish
    computer for a while, but that won't happen very often, and at least all
    the vital tasks will get done.

    Now all I have to do is (a) get a better understanding of cron and
    anacron, and (b) write the scripts to do my middle-of-the-night security
    stuff. I won't say that's trivial, but I won't have to (as I said earlier):

    > end up using is some combination of cron,
    > anacron, at, and the timestamps in /var/spool/anacron/cron.* .


    I'm making progress here... thanks, everyone, for your suggestions and
    guidance!

    Adam

  20. Re: Broadband Security

    Robert M. Riches Jr. wrote:
    > I want to know who gave permission to the politicians to
    > mess around with the clocks! :-(


    Seems to me that was arms industry executives in WW-II.
    Asking workers to come in at 0400 or 0500 was not well
    received, but if the clocks could be moved a couple of
    hours things would start closer to sunrise and the
    second shift would have more daylight hours.

    Once it had been done once, lots of people decided it
    would be nifty to keep doing it.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

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