ooffice and equation editor - Mandriva

This is a discussion on ooffice and equation editor - Mandriva ; A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of the things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class. Since he is a physicist, he needs equations. Does anyone know of a good equation ...

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  1. ooffice and equation editor

    A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of the
    things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class. Since he is
    a physicist, he needs equations. Does anyone know of a good equation editor
    for ooffice? He says that what he has found is pretty inadequate, but may
    well have missed something. Does anyone have any adivce?

    Thanks



  2. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    On 2007-04-11, Unruh wrote:
    > A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of the
    > things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class. Since he is
    > a physicist, he needs equations. Does anyone know of a good equation editor
    > for ooffice? He says that what he has found is pretty inadequate, but may
    > well have missed something. Does anyone have any adivce?


    If you can't find a better option, I would suggest
    Applixware version 5. You can find copies on Ebay fairly
    for not much. For Mandriva 2007, it requires a version of
    the 'rpm' package from testing. (I can give more details if
    needed.) I made it through a whole CSE master's degree
    program and three additional courses using it for those
    courses that required assignments in fancy form.

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  3. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Quoth Unruh :

    > A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of the
    > things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class. Since he
    > is a physicist, he needs equations. Does anyone know of a good equation
    > editor for ooffice? He says that what he has found is pretty inadequate,
    > but may well have missed something. Does anyone have any adivce?


    I can't speak to suitability but "urpmi koffice-kformula" will at least
    provide an alternative (for KDE users). I can attest to the fact that
    koffice is currently healthier than it used to be.
    --
    The Man in the Yellow Hat
    Linux with a monkey, since 1996.

  4. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Unruh wrote:
    > A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of
    > the things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class.
    > Since he is a physicist, he needs equations.


    Has your colleague looked at TeX Live?
    http://www.tug.org/texlive/

    I haven't used any of these things, but I started googling out of
    curiousity and I didn't want to waste my effort.

    First I found eqe
    http://rlehy.free.fr/
    which has a screenshot that looks good, so I was encouraged that I
    was on the right track.

    I don't have LaTeX or TeX on my Mandriva 2006 CDs, but I do have
    teTeX on my CDs:
    "Description: teTeX is an implementation of TeX for Linux or UNIX
    systems."

    Since your colleague uses Mandriva 2007, I looked in the Mandriva
    2007 software sources for teTeX but did not find it. I suspect that
    is because:
    "I (Thomas Esser) have decided not to make new releases of teTeX any
    more (May 2006). The information below might get out of date as time
    goes by. I suggest anybody interested in teTeX to join the TeX Live
    project." which is from
    http://www.tug.org/tetex/

  5. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    "Scott B." writes:

    >Unruh wrote:
    >> A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of
    >> the things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class.
    >> Since he is a physicist, he needs equations.


    >Has your colleague looked at TeX Live?
    >http://www.tug.org/texlive/


    He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles, but
    rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with embedded equations.
    He finds teh power point equation editing very primative, but suspects that
    maybe he just does not understand Open Office or how to set it up.



    >I haven't used any of these things, but I started googling out of
    >curiousity and I didn't want to waste my effort.


    >First I found eqe
    >http://rlehy.free.fr/
    >which has a screenshot that looks good, so I was encouraged that I
    >was on the right track.


    >I don't have LaTeX or TeX on my Mandriva 2006 CDs, but I do have
    >teTeX on my CDs:
    >"Description: teTeX is an implementation of TeX for Linux or UNIX
    >systems."


    >Since your colleague uses Mandriva 2007, I looked in the Mandriva
    >2007 software sources for teTeX but did not find it. I suspect that
    >is because:
    >"I (Thomas Esser) have decided not to make new releases of teTeX any
    >more (May 2006). The information below might get out of date as time
    >goes by. I suggest anybody interested in teTeX to join the TeX Live
    >project." which is from
    >http://www.tug.org/tetex/


  6. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    On 2007-04-11, Unruh wrote:
    > "Scott B." writes:
    >
    >>Unruh wrote:
    >>> A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of
    >>> the things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class.
    >>> Since he is a physicist, he needs equations.

    >
    >>Has your colleague looked at TeX Live?
    >>http://www.tug.org/texlive/

    >
    > He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles, but
    > rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with embedded equations.
    > He finds teh power point equation editing very primative, but suspects that
    > maybe he just does not understand Open Office or how to set it up.


    snip

    Perhaps he could use TeX (or Lyx - which is available for Mandriva) to
    produce a file which can be imported into his presentation? I'm not a
    physicist or a presentation guru, but I do know of one physics teacher who
    uses LaTeX (on a Mac) to produce very presentable documents incorporating
    formulae and equations. Word Processors generally seem to be very weak at
    handling conventional mathematical and 'scientific' notation.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~

  7. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Unruh wrote:
    > He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles,
    > but rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with
    > embedded equations. He finds teh power point equation editing very
    > primative, but suspects that maybe he just does not understand Open
    > Office or how to set it up.


    I have read that the OOo equation editing is too primitive for
    mathemeticians (and others). Your colleague would not use OOo Math
    or Impress to edit equations more advanced than the builtin OOo
    offerings. He would make another image for each subsequent step,
    then embed each into OOo Impress.

    Simple example:
    ab = c (make and embed an image for the first slide)
    a = c/b (edit the first text file, then make and embed an image for
    the second slide)

    BTW, I'm listening right now to a radio interview (KTTH) of John
    Cramer at the University of Washington.

  8. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Scott B. wrote:
    > Unruh wrote:
    >> He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles,
    >> but rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with
    >> embedded equations. He finds teh power point equation editing very
    >> primative, but suspects that maybe he just does not understand Open
    >> Office or how to set it up.

    >
    > I have read that the OOo equation editing is too primitive for
    > mathemeticians (and others). Your colleague would not use OOo Math
    > or Impress to edit equations more advanced than the builtin OOo
    > offerings. He would make another image for each subsequent step,
    > then embed each into OOo Impress.
    >
    > Simple example:
    > ab = c (make and embed an image for the first slide)
    > a = c/b (edit the first text file, then make and embed an image for
    > the second slide)
    >
    > BTW, I'm listening right now to a radio interview (KTTH) of John
    > Cramer at the University of Washington.

    Hello Unruh,
    I type quite a bit of mathematics and I've used Lyx for a number of
    years. Lyx produces Latex code which the Lyx user never views. Lyx comes
    with a tutorial and with a manual. Lyx allows the import of graphics.
    You can input additional mathematical symbols from the keyboard. A very
    good source of mathematical symbols which can be input from the keyboard
    is the book,
    The Latex Companion by Goosens.
    Lyx also provides a menu entry for viewing the mathematical text just
    input. This view is exactly the page(s) you would expect to output by a
    normal printer.
    Donald

  9. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Donald MacKinnon writes:

    >Scott B. wrote:
    >> Unruh wrote:
    >>> He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles,
    >>> but rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with
    >>> embedded equations. He finds teh power point equation editing very
    >>> primative, but suspects that maybe he just does not understand Open
    >>> Office or how to set it up.

    >>
    >> I have read that the OOo equation editing is too primitive for
    >> mathemeticians (and others). Your colleague would not use OOo Math
    >> or Impress to edit equations more advanced than the builtin OOo
    >> offerings. He would make another image for each subsequent step,
    >> then embed each into OOo Impress.
    >>
    >> Simple example:
    >> ab = c (make and embed an image for the first slide)
    >> a = c/b (edit the first text file, then make and embed an image for
    >> the second slide)
    >>
    >> BTW, I'm listening right now to a radio interview (KTTH) of John
    >> Cramer at the University of Washington.

    >Hello Unruh,
    >I type quite a bit of mathematics and I've used Lyx for a number of
    >years. Lyx produces Latex code which the Lyx user never views. Lyx comes
    >with a tutorial and with a manual. Lyx allows the import of graphics.
    >You can input additional mathematical symbols from the keyboard. A very
    >good source of mathematical symbols which can be input from the keyboard
    >is the book,
    >The Latex Companion by Goosens.
    >Lyx also provides a menu entry for viewing the mathematical text just
    >input. This view is exactly the page(s) you would expect to output by a
    >normal printer.
    >Donald


    The problem again is not with papers. The problem is with "powerpoint" type
    presentations. Latex allows inport of pictures, but it is a bit of a kludge
    and it is not terribly easy ( eg nor simply point and click )

    The question still is-- has anyone created an equation editor for Open
    Office Impress which is at least as good as the one that is contained in
    Powerpoint?


  10. Re: ooffice and equation editor


    OK, I found omath-- the math editor for openoffice. It uses some obscure
    markup language ( well obscure to me.)

    prod from{iiint %mu } to{%KAPPA} ldbracket tan(sin(y)^{cos(x)})
    rdbracket = f(y)newline newline ( partial _x +partial_y ) %PSI%phi(x,y) %PI
    %SIGMA %tau {int from 0 to x %lambda(t) dt} over {sin(%chi) }

    is an example of an equation. What markup language is this?
    (It looks a lot like a TeX bastardization.)


    Unruh writes:

    >Donald MacKinnon writes:


    >>Scott B. wrote:
    >>> Unruh wrote:
    >>>> He certainly knows about Tex. The problem is not making articles,
    >>>> but rather power point presentation ( or Open Office ) with
    >>>> embedded equations. He finds teh power point equation editing very
    >>>> primative, but suspects that maybe he just does not understand Open
    >>>> Office or how to set it up.
    >>>
    >>> I have read that the OOo equation editing is too primitive for
    >>> mathemeticians (and others). Your colleague would not use OOo Math
    >>> or Impress to edit equations more advanced than the builtin OOo
    >>> offerings. He would make another image for each subsequent step,
    >>> then embed each into OOo Impress.
    >>>
    >>> Simple example:
    >>> ab = c (make and embed an image for the first slide)
    >>> a = c/b (edit the first text file, then make and embed an image for
    >>> the second slide)
    >>>
    >>> BTW, I'm listening right now to a radio interview (KTTH) of John
    >>> Cramer at the University of Washington.

    >>Hello Unruh,
    >>I type quite a bit of mathematics and I've used Lyx for a number of
    >>years. Lyx produces Latex code which the Lyx user never views. Lyx comes
    >>with a tutorial and with a manual. Lyx allows the import of graphics.
    >>You can input additional mathematical symbols from the keyboard. A very
    >>good source of mathematical symbols which can be input from the keyboard
    >>is the book,
    >>The Latex Companion by Goosens.
    >>Lyx also provides a menu entry for viewing the mathematical text just
    >>input. This view is exactly the page(s) you would expect to output by a
    >>normal printer.
    >>Donald


    >The problem again is not with papers. The problem is with "powerpoint" type
    >presentations. Latex allows inport of pictures, but it is a bit of a kludge
    >and it is not terribly easy ( eg nor simply point and click )


    >The question still is-- has anyone created an equation editor for Open
    >Office Impress which is at least as good as the one that is contained in
    >Powerpoint?



  11. Re: ooffice and equation editor

    Unruh wrote:
    > A collegue has just started to use Linux (Mandriva 2007) and one of the
    > things he needs is to prepare powerpoint type slides for class. Since he is
    > a physicist, he needs equations. Does anyone know of a good equation editor
    > for ooffice? He says that what he has found is pretty inadequate, but may
    > well have missed something. Does anyone have any adivce?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >

    Hello,

    I teach high school calculus and I have found the open office equation
    editor to be quite powerful, more so than the built in formula editor
    that comes with MS Office. I personally prefer it to Math Type. I have
    used it for about 8 years now. (its the same editor that Star Office
    has, so it predates open office.)It can be used with a point and click
    interface, which is quite clumsy but allows you to learn the markup
    language which can be typed directly into a window and lets you see the
    result instantly. A lot of the tags are similar to Latex (at least on a
    very basic level.) It does have a bit of a learning curve but so does
    any formula editor. I don't usually compose anything in "Impress" but
    from the word processor you just do insert --> object ---> formula to
    bring up the editor window. I believe that it is the same string of
    commands in impress.

    Good Luck,

    Mark

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