unable to read superblock - Mandrake

This is a discussion on unable to read superblock - Mandrake ; I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning. I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy. After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the system responded strangely, ...

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  1. unable to read superblock

    I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept scrolling
    and scrolling.
    I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.

    I hit the reset button.
    I tried to login again.
    At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the hard
    drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    I chose linux.
    Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    process.
    I tried failsafe, same thing.

    There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2

    There is more.

    Question:
    Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is the
    partition number) then this might help.
    If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    correct.

    What can I do?

    Help appreciated

    Alp




  2. Re: unable to read superblock

    Can you get a live cd with a bootable linux, like Knoppix.
    You can look at your partitions. If they are readable, you can save a
    lot of data.
    Robert



    Alp wrote:
    > I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    > I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    > After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    > system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept scrolling
    > and scrolling.
    > I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >
    > I hit the reset button.
    > I tried to login again.
    > At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    > I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the hard
    > drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    > I chose linux.
    > Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    > process.
    > I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >
    > There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    > hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    > pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >
    > There is more.
    >
    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    > problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    > browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    > I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is the
    > partition number) then this might help.
    > If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    > correct.
    >
    > What can I do?
    >
    > Help appreciated
    >
    > Alp
    >
    >
    >


  3. Re: unable to read superblock

    Yes, I was able to use Knoppix 3.3

    I can see my boot partition (vmlinux, sysmap, etc.) on hda10
    But everything else on hda11 is not seen.
    trying fsck /dev/hda11 give :
    fsck.ext2: Attempt to read block from file system resulted in short read
    while trying to open /dev/hda11. Could this be a zero-length partition"

    I guess that means it is pretty bad huh?

    What can I do?

    Alp

    "Robert.Spilleboudt " wrote in
    message news:463A4573.7050903@skynet.be...
    > Can you get a live cd with a bootable linux, like Knoppix.
    > You can look at your partitions. If they are readable, you can save a lot
    > of data.
    > Robert
    >
    >
    >
    > Alp wrote:
    >> I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    >> I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    >> After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    >> system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept
    >> scrolling
    >> and scrolling.
    >> I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >>
    >> I hit the reset button.
    >> I tried to login again.
    >> At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    >> I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the
    >> hard
    >> drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    >> I chose linux.
    >> Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    >> process.
    >> I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >>
    >> There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    >> hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    >> pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >>
    >> There is more.
    >>
    >> Question:
    >> Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    >> problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    >> browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    >> I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is
    >> the
    >> partition number) then this might help.
    >> If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    >> correct.
    >>
    >> What can I do?
    >>
    >> Help appreciated
    >>
    >> Alp
    >>
    >>



  4. Re: unable to read superblock

    waz wrote:
    > Yes, I was able to use Knoppix 3.3
    >
    > I can see my boot partition (vmlinux, sysmap, etc.) on hda10
    > But everything else on hda11 is not seen.
    > trying fsck /dev/hda11 give :
    > fsck.ext2: Attempt to read block from file system resulted in short read
    > while trying to open /dev/hda11. Could this be a zero-length partition"
    >
    > I guess that means it is pretty bad huh?


    Yes.

    > What can I do?


    Others may have better ideas, but I will offer a couple.

    If you have the diagnostic/maintenance software for your hard
    drive (often downloadable from the manufacturer's web site
    support section), use it. Let it fix the disk if it can.
    It may take two or three runs before all is squared away, and
    you may lose all data on the problem partition.

    Otherwise, umount the partition/confirm it is unmounted
    (mount command in a terminal window) and run first badblocks
    /dev/hda11 and then fsck -y /dev/hda11. Repeat two or three
    times if the command chokes up, in hope that it will get a good
    enough read to proceed onward.

    I trust you do keep reasonably current backups of all critical
    data on your system.... You will likely need that.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    Unix is not user-unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

  5. Re: unable to read superblock

    I have cut and pasted file contents that give the output of smartctl -a
    /dev/hda and fdisk -l

    I see hda11 in the fdisk output, but I am still unable to read anything from
    it.
    I was tempted to try fsck -t ext2 /dev/hda11, but thought I should wait and
    see what the more experienced had to say.

    Thanks for you help.



    Smartctl =
    ********
    Device: Maxtor 6Y060L0 Supports ATA Version 7
    Drive supports S.M.A.R.T. and is enabled
    Check S.M.A.R.T. Passed.

    General Smart Values:
    Off-line data collection status: (0x80) Offline data collection activity was
    never started

    Self-test execution status: ( 0) The previous self-test routine
    completed
    without error or no self-test has ever
    been run

    Total time to complete off-line
    data collection: ( 181) Seconds

    Offline data collection
    Capabilities: (0x5b)SMART EXECUTE OFF-LINE IMMEDIATE
    Automatic timer ON/OFF support
    Suspend Offline Collection upon new
    command
    Offline surface scan supported
    Self-test supported

    Smart Capablilities: (0x0003) Saves SMART data before entering
    power-saving mode
    Supports SMART auto save timer

    Error logging capability: (0x01) Error logging supported

    Short self-test routine
    recommended polling time: ( 2) Minutes

    Extended self-test routine
    recommended polling time: ( 32) Minutes

    Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
    Revision Number: 16
    Attribute Flag Value Worst Threshold Raw Value
    ( 3)Spin Up Time 0x0027 226 225 063 6168
    ( 4)Start Stop Count 0x0032 253 253 000 1205
    ( 5)Reallocated Sector Ct 0x0033 253 253 063 1
    ( 6)Read Channel Margin 0x0001 253 253 100 0
    ( 7)Seek Error Rate 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    ( 8)Seek Time Preformance 0x0027 253 248 187 38671
    ( 9)Power On Hours 0x0032 239 239 000 33707
    ( 10)Spin Retry Count 0x002b 253 252 157 0
    ( 11)Calibration Retry Count 0x002b 253 252 223 0
    ( 12)Power Cycle Count 0x0032 244 244 000 3899
    (192)Power-Off Retract Count 0x0032 253 253 000 0
    (193)Load Cycle Count 0x0032 253 253 000 0
    (194)Temperature 0x0032 253 253 000 30
    (195)Hardware ECC Recovered 0x000a 253 252 000 1233
    (196)Reallocated Event Count 0x0008 253 253 000 0
    (197)Current Pending Sector 0x0008 253 253 000 1
    (198)Offline Uncorrectable 0x0008 253 253 000 0
    (199)UDMA CRC Error Count 0x0008 199 197 000 2
    (200)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (201)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 2
    (202)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (203)Unknown Attribute 0x000b 253 252 180 5
    (204)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (205)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (207)Unknown Attribute 0x002a 253 252 000 0
    (208)Unknown Attribute 0x002a 253 252 000 0
    (209)Unknown Attribute 0x0024 190 190 000 0
    ( 99)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    (100)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    (101)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    SMART Error Log:
    SMART Error Logging Version: 1
    Error Log Data Structure Pointer: 05
    ATA Error Count: 206
    Non-Fatal Count: 0

    Error Log Structure 1:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 0f 7c ce e5 c4 5815
    08 00 04 ef 7b ce e5 c4 5815
    08 00 02 f1 7b ce e5 c4 5816
    08 00 04 ef 7b ce e5 c4 5817
    08 00 02 f1 7b ce e5 c4 5818
    00 40 02 f1 7b ce e5 51 2203700
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 2:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 02 42 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 6816
    00 40 08 ef 7b ce e5 51 2204698
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 3:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 6816
    08 00 06 f1 7b ce e5 c4 6818
    00 40 06 f1 7b ce e5 51 2204699
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 4:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 02 42 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 320
    00 40 08 ef 7b ce e5 51 2207967
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4622 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 5:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 320
    08 00 06 f1 7b ce e5 c4 321
    00 40 06 f1 7b ce e5 51 2207968
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4622 (life of the drive in hours)


    fdisk -l =
    *******
    Disk /dev/hda: 61.4 GB, 61492838400 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7476
    cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device Boot Start
    End
    Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 * 1 1122 9012433+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA) /dev/hda2
    1123
    7476 51038505 f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/hda5 1123 1186 514048+ 6 FAT16
    /dev/hda6
    1187 3156 15823993+ b W95 FAT32 /dev/hda7 3157 5126 15823993+ b W95 FAT32
    /dev/hda8 5127 5889 6128766 b W95 FAT32 /dev/hda9 5890 5953 514048+ 82 Linux
    swap /dev/hda10 5954 6064 891576 83 Linux /dev/hda11 6065 7476 11341858+ 83
    Linux




  6. Re: unable to read superblock

    I have cut and pasted file contents that give the output of smartctl -a
    /dev/hda and fdisk -l

    I see hda11 in the fdisk output, but I am still unable to read anything from
    it.
    I was tempted to try fsck -t ext2 /dev/hda11, but thought I should wait and
    see what the more experienced had to say.

    Thanks for you help.

    Alp



    Smartctl =
    ********
    Device: Maxtor 6Y060L0 Supports ATA Version 7
    Drive supports S.M.A.R.T. and is enabled
    Check S.M.A.R.T. Passed.

    General Smart Values:
    Off-line data collection status: (0x80) Offline data collection activity was
    never started

    Self-test execution status: ( 0) The previous self-test routine
    completed
    without error or no self-test has ever
    been run

    Total time to complete off-line
    data collection: ( 181) Seconds

    Offline data collection
    Capabilities: (0x5b)SMART EXECUTE OFF-LINE IMMEDIATE
    Automatic timer ON/OFF support
    Suspend Offline Collection upon new
    command
    Offline surface scan supported
    Self-test supported

    Smart Capablilities: (0x0003) Saves SMART data before entering
    power-saving mode
    Supports SMART auto save timer

    Error logging capability: (0x01) Error logging supported

    Short self-test routine
    recommended polling time: ( 2) Minutes

    Extended self-test routine
    recommended polling time: ( 32) Minutes

    Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
    Revision Number: 16
    Attribute Flag Value Worst Threshold Raw Value
    ( 3)Spin Up Time 0x0027 226 225 063 6168
    ( 4)Start Stop Count 0x0032 253 253 000 1205
    ( 5)Reallocated Sector Ct 0x0033 253 253 063 1
    ( 6)Read Channel Margin 0x0001 253 253 100 0
    ( 7)Seek Error Rate 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    ( 8)Seek Time Preformance 0x0027 253 248 187 38671
    ( 9)Power On Hours 0x0032 239 239 000 33707
    ( 10)Spin Retry Count 0x002b 253 252 157 0
    ( 11)Calibration Retry Count 0x002b 253 252 223 0
    ( 12)Power Cycle Count 0x0032 244 244 000 3899
    (192)Power-Off Retract Count 0x0032 253 253 000 0
    (193)Load Cycle Count 0x0032 253 253 000 0
    (194)Temperature 0x0032 253 253 000 30
    (195)Hardware ECC Recovered 0x000a 253 252 000 1233
    (196)Reallocated Event Count 0x0008 253 253 000 0
    (197)Current Pending Sector 0x0008 253 253 000 1
    (198)Offline Uncorrectable 0x0008 253 253 000 0
    (199)UDMA CRC Error Count 0x0008 199 197 000 2
    (200)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (201)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 2
    (202)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (203)Unknown Attribute 0x000b 253 252 180 5
    (204)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (205)Unknown Attribute 0x000a 253 252 000 0
    (207)Unknown Attribute 0x002a 253 252 000 0
    (208)Unknown Attribute 0x002a 253 252 000 0
    (209)Unknown Attribute 0x0024 190 190 000 0
    ( 99)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    (100)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    (101)Unknown Attribute 0x0004 253 253 000 0
    SMART Error Log:
    SMART Error Logging Version: 1
    Error Log Data Structure Pointer: 05
    ATA Error Count: 206
    Non-Fatal Count: 0

    Error Log Structure 1:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 0f 7c ce e5 c4 5815
    08 00 04 ef 7b ce e5 c4 5815
    08 00 02 f1 7b ce e5 c4 5816
    08 00 04 ef 7b ce e5 c4 5817
    08 00 02 f1 7b ce e5 c4 5818
    00 40 02 f1 7b ce e5 51 2203700
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 2:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 02 42 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 6816
    00 40 08 ef 7b ce e5 51 2204698
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 3:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 6816
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 6816
    08 00 06 f1 7b ce e5 c4 6818
    00 40 06 f1 7b ce e5 51 2204699
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4621 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 4:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 02 42 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 320
    00 40 08 ef 7b ce e5 51 2207967
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4622 (life of the drive in hours)

    Error Log Structure 5:
    DCR FR SC SN CL SH D/H CR Timestamp
    08 00 08 40 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 48 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 60 46 b3 e5 c4 320
    08 00 08 ef 7b ce e5 c4 320
    08 00 06 f1 7b ce e5 c4 321
    00 40 06 f1 7b ce e5 51 2207968
    Error condition: 3 Error State: 0
    Number of Hours in Drive Life: 4622 (life of the drive in hours)


    fdisk -l =
    *******
    Disk /dev/hda: 61.4 GB, 61492838400 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7476
    cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device Boot Start
    End
    Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 * 1 1122 9012433+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA) /dev/hda2
    1123
    7476 51038505 f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/hda5 1123 1186 514048+ 6 FAT16
    /dev/hda6
    1187 3156 15823993+ b W95 FAT32 /dev/hda7 3157 5126 15823993+ b W95 FAT32
    /dev/hda8 5127 5889 6128766 b W95 FAT32 /dev/hda9 5890 5953 514048+ 82 Linux
    swap /dev/hda10 5954 6064 891576 83 Linux /dev/hda11 6065 7476 11341858+ 83
    Linux




  7. Re: unable to read superblock

    On Fri, 04 May 2007 23:37:18 -0400, waz wrote:

    > I see hda11 in the fdisk output, but I am still unable to read anything from
    > it.


    If you really need the data, consider a company like
    http://invircible.com/

    If you want to spend the time experimenting yourself, the
    first step would be to make a copy (sector by sector), of
    whatever is still readable from the drive.

    Given that this appears to be a hardware failure, the more
    time the drive is powered up, the more data you're likely
    to lose.

    Disconnect the drive, until you've decided what you want to
    do.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  8. Re: unable to read superblock

    waz wrote:

    > I have cut and pasted file contents that give the output of smartctl -a
    > /dev/hda and fdisk -l


    Good, although the line wrap got a bit crazy somehow.

    > I see hda11 in the fdisk output, but I am still unable to read
    > anything from it.
    > I was tempted to try fsck -t ext2 /dev/hda11, but thought I should wait
    > and see what the more experienced had to say.


    [snip]
    > fdisk -l =
    > *******
    > Disk /dev/hda: 61.4 GB, 61492838400 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7476 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device
    > Boot Start End Blocks Id System

    [snip]
    > /dev/hda11 6065 7476 11341858+ 83 Linux


    That line looks perfectly reasonable to me. I am assuming
    that those numbers correspond to everything from the end of
    hda10 to the end of the disk. I thought that you wrote that
    there was a zero length partition. Looking back I see that
    you asked if it was a zero length partition. The answer is,
    "no - it's not a zero length partition". I don't think that
    there is any point in trying to do anything with fdisk.

    Something has corrupted a superblock. I think that there
    are redundant (backup) superblocks in ext2/3 - but I don't
    know how to make use of them. The man pages for mount
    give some information. Possibly adding "sb=131072" to
    /etc/fstab will do it.

    I strongly recommend trying to back up as much as possible
    from that drive and especially from that partition before
    you "just trying things".


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

  9. Re: unable to read superblock

    On May 4, 12:31 am, "Alp" wrote:
    > I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    > I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    > After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    > system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept scrolling
    > and scrolling.
    > I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >
    > I hit the reset button.
    > I tried to login again.
    > At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    > I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the hard
    > drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    > I chose linux.
    > Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    > process.
    > I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >
    > There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    > hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    > pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >
    > There is more.
    >
    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    > problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    > browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    > I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is the
    > partition number) then this might help.
    > If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    > correct.
    >
    > What can I do?
    >
    > Help appreciated
    >
    > Alp


    OK...first let me tell you that u have described it all in very
    descriptive methoed.....if u r running multiple operating systems on
    your computer then try to boot from other OS and make sure that there
    is no error due to your hard drive....if it boots from other OS this
    means that your hard drive is ok.....I have not tried it on manderake
    but on several other linux systems it is possible that u can boot from
    your CD and get to the root in single user mode.....go for the data
    destinations in text based mode and try to move that data to safe
    partitions or some external media......I think its clear to u that
    first try to boot from other OS on ur hard drive and then try to
    rescue this linux side by using CD access....if not possible ....just
    place ur hard drive in any other machine that is running linux....make
    ur drive as slave ....then boot that machine and move ur data on that
    system by copying it ....and for the next time...dont use EXT2
    filesystem....prefer EXT3 filesystem...hope it helps alot

    Regards

    Jam


  10. Re: unable to read superblock


    Jam
    I read your reply. Thanks.

    The drive has a bad sector in the partition where /home, /root, /lib, /usr,
    /.... is located.
    only my /boot directory is on another partition.
    As a result, I can see the /boot dir, but no user data is stored there.
    The dual boot OS works fine. (win 98).

    I have used knoppix l3.3 to boot up and look at the mess. hda11 is not
    accessible from knoppix.
    I ran some fdisk -l and smartctl -a /dev/hda copmmands to get info for
    another guy who said he might be able to help.
    Today I used maxblast 5 to copy what it could from the sick partition. It
    saved about 12 gig in 3 xxx.tib files that I cannot read (look at contents
    like in a .zip file). I assume they are proper image files that can be used
    eventually to restore most of the data.
    I will try to save the partition again in "non-tib format if I can.

    Yes, I use EXT3 on my other system, though I do not know if would have
    helped in a situation like mine where the superblock got damaged.

    Thanks,

    Alp


    "JAM" wrote in message
    news:1178372671.917344.194050@n59g2000hsh.googlegr oups.com...
    > On May 4, 12:31 am, "Alp" wrote:
    >> I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    >> I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    >> After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    >> system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept
    >> scrolling
    >> and scrolling.
    >> I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >>
    >> I hit the reset button.
    >> I tried to login again.
    >> At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    >> I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the
    >> hard
    >> drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    >> I chose linux.
    >> Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    >> process.
    >> I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >>
    >> There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    >> hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    >> pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >>
    >> There is more.
    >>
    >> Question:
    >> Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    >> problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    >> browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    >> I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is
    >> the
    >> partition number) then this might help.
    >> If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    >> correct.
    >>
    >> What can I do?
    >>
    >> Help appreciated
    >>
    >> Alp

    >
    > OK...first let me tell you that u have described it all in very
    > descriptive methoed.....if u r running multiple operating systems on
    > your computer then try to boot from other OS and make sure that there
    > is no error due to your hard drive....if it boots from other OS this
    > means that your hard drive is ok.....I have not tried it on manderake
    > but on several other linux systems it is possible that u can boot from
    > your CD and get to the root in single user mode.....go for the data
    > destinations in text based mode and try to move that data to safe
    > partitions or some external media......I think its clear to u that
    > first try to boot from other OS on ur hard drive and then try to
    > rescue this linux side by using CD access....if not possible ....just
    > place ur hard drive in any other machine that is running linux....make
    > ur drive as slave ....then boot that machine and move ur data on that
    > system by copying it ....and for the next time...dont use EXT2
    > filesystem....prefer EXT3 filesystem...hope it helps alot
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Jam
    >




  11. Re: unable to read superblock

    I continue to work on this problem. Currently I am using maxblast 5 to copy
    what it can from the sick partition. It has about 12 gig copied into 3
    xxx.tib files.
    As far as zero length partitions... No, i was not asking if it was zero
    length, I was repeating the error message that was presented when I tried to
    do something (fsck?).

    And yes, fdsik seems to have seen hda11 which does sit after hda10 and the
    end of disk.

    I understand there are backup super blocks as well. However the proper value
    to use in the -b option of fsck currently eludes me as I am still at the
    lower end of the knowledge curve. I might be able to stumble upon it in the
    next few days. If someone can tell me how PLEASE do.

    Alp


    "Peter D." wrote in message
    news:qp3ug4-jt8.ln1@psd.news.gnode.com.au...
    > waz wrote:
    >
    >> I have cut and pasted file contents that give the output of smartctl -a
    >> /dev/hda and fdisk -l

    >
    > Good, although the line wrap got a bit crazy somehow.
    >
    >> I see hda11 in the fdisk output, but I am still unable to read
    >> anything from it.
    >> I was tempted to try fsck -t ext2 /dev/hda11, but thought I should wait
    >> and see what the more experienced had to say.

    >
    > [snip]
    >> fdisk -l =
    >> *******
    >> Disk /dev/hda: 61.4 GB, 61492838400 bytes
    >> 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7476 cylinders
    >> Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device
    >> Boot Start End Blocks Id System

    > [snip]
    >> /dev/hda11 6065 7476 11341858+ 83 Linux

    >
    > That line looks perfectly reasonable to me. I am assuming
    > that those numbers correspond to everything from the end of
    > hda10 to the end of the disk. I thought that you wrote that
    > there was a zero length partition. Looking back I see that
    > you asked if it was a zero length partition. The answer is,
    > "no - it's not a zero length partition". I don't think that
    > there is any point in trying to do anything with fdisk.
    >
    > Something has corrupted a superblock. I think that there
    > are redundant (backup) superblocks in ext2/3 - but I don't
    > know how to make use of them. The man pages for mount
    > give some information. Possibly adding "sb=131072" to
    > /etc/fstab will do it.
    >
    > I strongly recommend trying to back up as much as possible
    > from that drive and especially from that partition before
    > you "just trying things".
    >
    >
    > --
    > sig goes here...
    > Peter D.




  12. Re: unable to read superblock

    On Sat, 05 May 2007 16:05:06 -0400, waz wrote:

    > Today I used maxblast 5 to copy what it could from the sick partition. It
    > saved about 12 gig in 3 xxx.tib files that I cannot read (look at contents
    > like in a .zip file). I assume they are proper image files that can be used
    > eventually to restore most of the data.
    > I will try to save the partition again in "non-tib format if I can.


    I'd try the following ...

    Allocate a new partition, the with the same number of sectors, as the
    bad one.

    Use dd with the noerror option, to copy everything it can, from the
    bad partition, to the good one.

    On the good one, try running fsck.ext2 with the -b (appropriate number),
    to try using the backup superblock. The appropriate number will depend
    on the blocksize. See man fsck.ext2

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  13. Re: unable to read superblock

    Almost exactly what I did.
    I used maxblast 5. Put in an old HD. Saved what I could (it makes an xxx.tib
    file which is unreadable to me). Then I read some docs on superblock and
    data recovery. After failing to get it to mount with an alternate superblock
    I decided to try fsck.ext2 -b 32678 and hit return.
    I had to type "y" a large number of time hoping each time that I wasn't
    making the problem worse.
    Finally I gave up and just held the "y" key down. All or nothing.

    My mandrake partition is now up and running. I may never find out if
    everything survived, but I think it did.

    Thanks to all who gave tips, and a raspberry to those who didn't have faith.

    Alp

    "David W. Hodgins" wrote in message
    newsp.trvf4f05a3w0dx@hodgins.homeip.net...
    > On Sat, 05 May 2007 16:05:06 -0400, waz wrote:
    >
    >> Today I used maxblast 5 to copy what it could from the sick partition. It
    >> saved about 12 gig in 3 xxx.tib files that I cannot read (look at
    >> contents
    >> like in a .zip file). I assume they are proper image files that can be
    >> used
    >> eventually to restore most of the data.
    >> I will try to save the partition again in "non-tib format if I can.

    >
    > I'd try the following ...
    >
    > Allocate a new partition, the with the same number of sectors, as the
    > bad one.
    >
    > Use dd with the noerror option, to copy everything it can, from the
    > bad partition, to the good one.
    >
    > On the good one, try running fsck.ext2 with the -b (appropriate number),
    > to try using the backup superblock. The appropriate number will depend
    > on the blocksize. See man fsck.ext2
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >
    > --
    > Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    > (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    > use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)




  14. Re: unable to read superblock

    On 2007-05-06, waz wrote:
    > Almost exactly what I did.
    > I used maxblast 5. Put in an old HD. Saved what I could (it makes an xxx.tib
    > file which is unreadable to me). Then I read some docs on superblock and
    > data recovery. After failing to get it to mount with an alternate superblock
    > I decided to try fsck.ext2 -b 32678 and hit return.
    > I had to type "y" a large number of time hoping each time that I wasn't
    > making the problem worse.
    > Finally I gave up and just held the "y" key down. All or nothing.
    >
    > My mandrake partition is now up and running. I may never find out if
    > everything survived, but I think it did.


    If you have backup media, in a tarball perhaps, you could
    compare your most recent backup with what you have now.
    Disregard differences that reflect new files and such since
    the backup was done. That way, you would have an idea of
    how much was lost.

    I would guess if you didn't have backups, there's a much
    better chance you will start doing backups after this. Some
    have said there are two kinds of people: those who have lost
    data and those who will.

    Another trick I do (after having had a bunch of terminfo
    files go AWOL) is run a script that does 'rpm -qa' with
    output directed to a file, then the script does "rpm -V
    $pkg" on each package (with a header and trailer line for
    each package--else I would just go "rpm -Va"), also with
    output directed to a file. I keep those files around.
    Whenever I do a package update or something else
    significant, I run the script _before_ and _after_ the
    operation. Comparing today's 'before' against the previous
    'after' gives assurance that nothing changed behind my
    back--a bit of intrusion detection as a side benefit.
    Comparing today's 'before' and today's 'after' gives me a
    sanity check on what changed.

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

  15. Re: unable to read superblock

    On May 5, 11:27 pm, "Robert M. Riches Jr."
    wrote:
    > On 2007-05-06, waz wrote:
    >
    > > Almost exactly what I did.
    > > I used maxblast 5. Put in an old HD. Saved what I could (it makes an xxx.tib
    > > file which is unreadable to me). Then I read some docs on superblock and
    > > data recovery. After failing to get it to mount with an alternate superblock
    > > I decided to try fsck.ext2 -b 32678 and hit return.
    > > I had to type "y" a large number of time hoping each time that I wasn't
    > > making the problem worse.
    > > Finally I gave up and just held the "y" key down. All or nothing.

    >
    > > My mandrake partition is now up and running. I may never find out if
    > > everything survived, but I think it did.

    >
    > If you have backup media, in a tarball perhaps, you could
    > compare your most recent backup with what you have now.
    > Disregard differences that reflect new files and such since
    > the backup was done. That way, you would have an idea of
    > how much was lost.
    >
    > I would guess if you didn't have backups, there's a much
    > better chance you will start doing backups after this. Some
    > have said there are two kinds of people: those who have lost
    > data and those who will.
    >
    > Another trick I do (after having had a bunch of terminfo
    > files go AWOL) is run a script that does 'rpm -qa' with
    > output directed to a file, then the script does "rpm -V
    > $pkg" on each package (with a header and trailer line for
    > each package--else I would just go "rpm -Va"), also with
    > output directed to a file. I keep those files around.
    > Whenever I do a package update or something else
    > significant, I run the script _before_ and _after_ the
    > operation. Comparing today's 'before' against the previous
    > 'after' gives assurance that nothing changed behind my
    > back--a bit of intrusion detection as a side benefit.
    > Comparing today's 'before' and today's 'after' gives me a
    > sanity check on what changed.
    >

    Question for waz/Alp:

    Did you have to use the xxx.lib files? Does anyone here knoew what
    they would be good for? Is that specific to the recovery app that you
    were using?

    But nice going there. Usually for repairs in uncharted waters (so to
    speak) I would have a bottle o brew next to the hardware =) before I
    say, Once more unto the breach...

    About 2 or 3 times before commencing, that is.


  16. Re: unable to read superblock

    Problem Solved.

    Almost exactly what I did.
    I used maxblast 5. Put in an old HD. Saved what I could (it makes an xxx.tib
    file which is unreadable to me). Then I read some docs on superblock and
    data recovery. After failing to get it to mount with an alternate superblock
    I decided to try fsck.ext2 -b 32678 and hit return.
    I had to type "y" a large number of time hoping each time that I wasn't
    making the problem worse.
    Finally I gave up and just held the "y" key down. All or nothing.

    My mandrake partition is now up and running. I may never find out if
    everything survived, but I think it did.

    Thanks to all who gave tips, and a raspberry to those who didn't have faith.

    Alp

    "David W. Hodgins" wrote in message
    newsp.trvf4f05a3w0dx@hodgins.homeip.net...
    > On Sat, 05 May 2007 16:05:06 -0400, waz wrote:
    >
    >> Today I used maxblast 5 to copy what it could from the sick partition. It
    >> saved about 12 gig in 3 xxx.tib files that I cannot read (look at
    >> contents
    >> like in a .zip file). I assume they are proper image files that can be
    >> used
    >> eventually to restore most of the data.
    >> I will try to save the partition again in "non-tib format if I can.

    >
    > I'd try the following ...
    >
    > Allocate a new partition, the with the same number of sectors, as the
    > bad one.
    >
    > Use dd with the noerror option, to copy everything it can, from the
    > bad partition, to the good one.
    >
    > On the good one, try running fsck.ext2 with the -b (appropriate number),
    > to try using the backup superblock.**The*appropriate*number*will*depend
    > on the blocksize.**See*man*fsck.ext2
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >
    > --
    > Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    > (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    > use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

    Alp wrote:

    > I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    > I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    > After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    > system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept scrolling
    > and scrolling.
    > I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >
    > I hit the reset button.
    > I tried to login again.
    > At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    > I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the hard
    > drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    > I chose linux.
    > Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    > process.
    > I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >
    > There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    > hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    > pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >
    > There is more.
    >
    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    > problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    > browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    > I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is
    > the partition number) then this might help.
    > If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    > correct.
    >
    > What can I do?
    >
    > Help appreciated
    >
    > Alp



  17. Re: unable to read superblock

    On Mon, 07 May 2007 23:32:54 -0400, alp "> wrote:

    > Problem Solved.


    Glad you got it working. Nice when things work out the way they
    are supposed to. Thanks for posting the response.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  18. Re: unable to read superblock

    Alp schrieb:
    > I booted up my linux mandrake 10.1 system this morning.
    > I left it at the login window for a few minutes as I was busy.
    > After I finally did enter my login password (graphical login window) the
    > system responded strangely, text scrolled by the same thing kept scrolling
    > and scrolling.
    > I tried to stop it using various key presses but nothing would.
    >
    > I hit the reset button.
    > I tried to login again.
    > At first the system didn't see the hard drive.
    > I tried a few more times (I entered bios and tried to make it see the hard
    > drive) finally it booted to lilo.
    > I chose linux.
    > Then I got "EXT2-fs: unable to read superblock" partway into the boot
    > process.
    > I tried failsafe, same thing.
    >
    > There are several error messages, mount: error 22 mounting ext2.
    > hda: dma_intr: error = 0x40 {uncorrectableError } LBAsect=97418226
    > pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed: 2
    >
    > There is more.
    >
    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair the
    > problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails, schedules,
    > browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?
    > I read somewhere that if I am able to type in fsck /dev/hdan (where n is the
    > partition number) then this might help.
    > If you guessed I do not know what partition number to type you would be
    > correct.
    >
    > What can I do?
    >
    > Help appreciated
    >
    > Alp
    >
    >
    >


    First, how old is your hard disk?
    According to the given S.M.A.R.T. values, it might be over-time (but I
    am insure about that ;-)).
    Anyway, I would do the same things as written i the older replies:
    I would try to repair that partition with e2fsck /dev/hda11 and probably
    badblocks /dev/hda11.
    If that fails, I would try to execute e2fsck -b xxxx /dev/hda11. You
    have to replace xxxx with the block number, where a backup of your
    superblock is stored. That block depends on the block size on your
    partition.
    BLOCK SIZE | SUPERBLOCK BACKUP BLOCK
    ----- ---- - ---------- ------ -----
    1k | 8193
    2k | 16384
    4k | 32768

    If that fails too, try to execute e2fsck -c -b xxxx /dev/hda11. That
    will automatically check for bad blocks and mark them. (You might want
    to do a non-destructive read-write test to get the bad blocks. To do so,
    type e2fsck -c -c -b xxxx /dev/hda11.)

    If everything fails, I would try to make a bit copy of the _whole hard
    disk_ with dd.

    If that also fails, chances are bad to repair the partition.

  19. Re: unable to read superblock

    On Thu, 03 May 2007 19:31:50 +0000, Alp wrote:

    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair
    > the problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails,
    > schedules, browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?


    Yes, I am here. Backups, there are two types of people; those who have
    needed them and, those who will.


  20. Re: unable to read superblock

    On Thu, 03 May 2007 19:31:50 +0000, Alp wrote:

    > Question:
    > Is there some way for somebody who knows little about linux to repair
    > the problem (maybe using the install disk) so that all my emails,
    > schedules, browser bookmarks, (user data ) does not get erased?


    dd is the first command you should use, unless you have a backup. Make an
    image of the HD before you try to recovery the data.

    BTW why are you still using 10.1?

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