files in tmp. paranoid - Mandrake

This is a discussion on files in tmp. paranoid - Mandrake ; Good day group. Today I decided to trash what is not needed to clear up some hard disk space. I came across several entries (dated between one and two years ago) in my root/tmp directory. I want to know if ...

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  1. files in tmp. paranoid

    Good day group.

    Today I decided to trash what is not needed to clear up some hard disk
    space.
    I came across several entries (dated between one and two years ago) in my
    root/tmp directory. I want to know if they are safe to delete, and what
    they might be? Some sort of spy ware or such?

    I have 4 files called tmp-1.xpi, tmp-2.xpi, ... What are these?

    There is a directory called virtual-rootj5B9... with nothing in it and a
    directory called orbit-root with several files of type socket, 0 Bytes in
    size and a bonobo-activation-server-ior file.

    I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    permanently?

    Waz


  2. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    waz writes:

    > Good day group.
    >
    > Today I decided to trash what is not needed to clear up some hard disk
    > space.
    > I came across several entries (dated between one and two years ago) in my
    > root/tmp directory. I want to know if they are safe to delete, and what
    > they might be? Some sort of spy ware or such?
    >
    > I have 4 files called tmp-1.xpi, tmp-2.xpi, ... What are these?


    xpi is associated with browser plugins.
    Probably left over from some plugin you installed.

  3. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 17:40:56 -0500, waz wrote:

    > I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    > permanently?


    You can safely delete anything in /tmp, as long as it is not
    currently in use.

    I periodically (as root) run "telinit 1" to switch to run level 1,
    delete anything in /tmp, and then reboot. You also have the
    option of changing /tmp to use ram by changing the /etc/fstab to
    none /tmp tmpfs auto,nouser 0 0
    in which case it's gone whenever you reboot.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

  4. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 22:40:56 GMT, waz wrote:
    > Good day group.
    >
    > I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    > permanently?


    Check the dates on the *socket* orbit* and you will see some that are
    pretty fresh. They are used for communications with your desktop.

    No idea on the *xpi files.

    If you want it TEMPORARY, you could put a
    /bin/rm $HOME/tmp
    /bin/mkdir $HOME/tmp

    in $HOME/.bash_logout

    Downside is when you are working in root, log into root again and
    exit.


  5. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    On 28 Feb 2007 23:03:55 GMT, Bit Twister wrote:

    Whoops.
    If you want it TEMPORARY, you could put a
    /bin/rm -r $HOME/tmp
    /bin/mkdir $HOME/tmp

    in $HOME/.bash_logout

    Downside is when you are working in root, log into root again and
    exit.

  6. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    David W. Hodgins wrote:

    > On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 17:40:56 -0500, waz wrote:
    >
    >> I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    >> permanently?

    >
    > You can safely delete anything in /tmp, as long as it is not
    > currently in use.
    >
    > I periodically (as root) run "telinit 1" to switch to run level 1,
    > delete anything in /tmp, and then reboot. You also have the
    > option of changing /tmp to use ram by changing the /etc/fstab to
    > none /tmp tmpfs auto,nouser 0 0
    > in which case it's gone whenever you reboot.
    >
    > Regards, Dave Hodgins
    >


    I've got tmpwatch installed & a daily cron job set up as follows:

    #!/bin/sh

    [ -f /etc/sysconfig/tmpwatch ] && . /etc/sysconfig/tmpwatch

    /usr/sbin/tmpwatch $TMPWATCH_EXCLUDES
    240 /tmp /var/tmp /home/seaeagle/tmp /home/seaeagle/.thumbnails

    [ -f /etc/sysconfig/i18n ] && . /etc/sysconfig/i18n
    if [ -d /usr/share/man/$LANG/ ] && [ -d /var/catman/$LANG/ ]; then
    /usr/sbin/tmpwatch -f 240 /var/catman/{X11R6/cat?,cat?,local/cat?
    $LANG/cat?}
    else
    /usr/sbin/tmpwatch -f 240 /var/catman/{X11R6/cat?,cat?,local/cat?}
    fi

    It deletes all files in the above folders that have not been accessed for
    more than 10 days.

    If you've already got tmpwatch installed (I think it is automatically when
    you install Mandriva), then you may just need to go to your /etc/cron.daily
    folder & edit the tmpwatch.cron file (it may be in weekly - I can't
    remember if I moved to run as a daily job).

    Don't delete "$TMPWATCH_EXCLUDES" - it is a configuration file containing
    directories to be excluded from file deletion.

    I've also got a weekly cron job with the following lines to clear out my
    trash folders:

    #!/bin/bash
    # cleanup
    rm -rf /home/seaeagle/.local/share/Trash/files
    rm -rf /home/seaeagle/.local/share/Trash/info

    (obviously seaeagle is my logon name).

    They keep my system nice & clean

    --
    Nothing's Too Sacred - http://scott2096.blogspot.com/
    Email: seaeaglesrule-donotspam@gmail.com (remove "-donotspam")

    Registered Linux User # 384081 http://counter.li.org/

  7. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    waz wrote:

    > Good day group.
    >
    > Today I decided to trash what is not needed to clear up some hard disk
    > space.
    > I came across several entries (dated between one and two years ago) in my
    > root/tmp directory. I want to know if they are safe to delete, and what
    > they might be? Some sort of spy ware or such?
    >
    > I have 4 files called tmp-1.xpi, tmp-2.xpi, ... What are these?
    >
    > There is a directory called virtual-rootj5B9... with nothing in it and a
    > directory called orbit-root with several files of type socket, 0 Bytes in
    > size and a bonobo-activation-server-ior file.
    >
    > I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    > permanently?
    >
    > Waz


    Thanks to all those answers!

    I'll just do one final check on those xpi files, and I'll leave the socket
    types alone!

    Waz


  8. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    waz wrote:
    > Good day group.
    >
    > Today I decided to trash what is not needed to clear up some hard disk
    > space.
    > I came across several entries (dated between one and two years ago) in my
    > root/tmp directory. I want to know if they are safe to delete, and what
    > they might be? Some sort of spy ware or such?
    >
    > I have 4 files called tmp-1.xpi, tmp-2.xpi, ... What are these?
    >
    > There is a directory called virtual-rootj5B9... with nothing in it and a
    > directory called orbit-root with several files of type socket, 0 Bytes in
    > size and a bonobo-activation-server-ior file.
    >
    > I thought tmp was TEMPORARY. Why are things being stored in here
    > permanently?
    >
    > Waz
    >

    Mandrake Control Centre -> Boot -> Set up how system boots -> Advanced
    -> click on "Clean /tmp at each boot" should do it, but I'm not 100%
    convinced. The last tick doesn't seem to persist.

  9. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 23:27:49 +0000, Grimble wrote:

    > Mandrake Control Centre -> Boot -> Set up how system boots -> Advanced
    > -> click on "Clean /tmp at each boot" should do it, but I'm not 100%
    > convinced. The last tick doesn't seem to persist.


    What do you mean, persist.

    I have not looked at that in years, but IIRC, it just puts an entry in
    /etc/fstab to mount /tmp in ram via /etc/fstab.

    I cannot remember if boot loader gets an argument added or not.

    As an Oh by the way, the OP asked about root/tmp not /tmp

  10. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    Bit Twister wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 23:27:49 +0000, Grimble wrote:
    >
    >> Mandrake Control Centre -> Boot -> Set up how system boots -> Advanced
    >> -> click on "Clean /tmp at each boot" should do it, but I'm not 100%
    >> convinced. The last tick doesn't seem to persist.

    >
    > What do you mean, persist.

    The next time I go through the above sequence, the box is not ticked
    >
    > I have not looked at that in years, but IIRC, it just puts an entry in
    > /etc/fstab to mount /tmp in ram via /etc/fstab.
    >

    It must do something else, because my /tmp entry is unchanged:
    /dev/sda13 /tmp ext3 noatime 1 2
    > I cannot remember if boot loader gets an argument added or not.
    >
    > As an Oh by the way, the OP asked about root/tmp not /tmp

    Oops, but I wasn't the only one to make that assumption!

  11. Re: files in tmp. paranoid

    On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 13:10:00 +0000, Grimble wrote:
    > Bit Twister wrote:
    >> On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 23:27:49 +0000, Grimble wrote:
    >>
    >>> Mandrake Control Centre -> Boot -> Set up how system boots -> Advanced
    >>> -> click on "Clean /tmp at each boot" should do it, but I'm not 100%
    >>> convinced. The last tick doesn't seem to persist.

    >>
    >> What do you mean, persist.

    > The next time I go through the above sequence, the box is not ticked


    Ah yes that is what I thought you were talking about.
    Hehe, that's a _feature_.

    >> I have not looked at that in years, but IIRC, it just puts an entry in
    >> /etc/fstab to mount /tmp in ram via /etc/fstab.
    >>

    > It must do something else, because my /tmp entry is unchanged:
    > /dev/sda13 /tmp ext3 noatime 1 2


    When you have created your own partition for /tmp, that _feature_ shows up.

    Without your /tmp entry, you check Clean temp, you get a new entry in
    /etc/fstab like
    none /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0

    If MCC sees that, then the check box remains checked. Unchecking the
    box will remove the none /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0 entry.

    >> As an Oh by the way, the OP asked about root/tmp not /tmp

    > Oops, but I wasn't the only one to make that assumption!


    Well to give everyone some credit, the OP may have meant
    root /tmp by mis-typing and missing the space or meant
    /root/tmp by mis-typing and missing the leading /

    Either way, everyone had a chance to learn something. :-)

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