interested in wombats - Mandrake

This is a discussion on interested in wombats - Mandrake ; Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia, or also on other continents? Apart from zoos, of course. 18 -- Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com...

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  1. interested in wombats

    Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia,
    or also on other continents?

    Apart from zoos, of course.

    18


    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  2. Re: interested in wombats

    On 27 Nov 2006 23:48:10 GMT, wombat@fancier.net found these unused words
    floating about:

    >Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia,
    >or also on other continents?
    >
    >Apart from zoos, of course.
    >
    >18


    The Chicago Cubs had wombats this fall.
    That's why the got that far.


  3. Re: interested in wombats

    wombat@fancier.net wrote:
    > Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia,
    > or also on other continents?
    >
    > Apart from zoos, of course.
    >
    > 18


    Wombats: The mats used by Taxi drivers to keep their cars clean for
    very important deliveries.


  4. Re: interested in wombats

    On 28 Nov 2006 23:26:27 -0800, kingpin+nntp@lumbercartel.ca found these
    unused words floating about:

    >wombat@fancier.net wrote:
    >> Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia,
    >> or also on other continents?
    >>
    >> Apart from zoos, of course.

    >
    >Wombats: The mats used by Taxi drivers to keep their cars clean for
    >very important deliveries.


    Wombat: What you have when you hit a home run.


  5. Re: interested in wombats

    kingpin+nntp@lumbercartel.ca wrote:

    > wombat@fancier.net wrote:
    >> Can someone tell me whether Wombats live only in Australia,
    >> or also on other continents?
    >>
    >> Apart from zoos, of course.
    >>
    >> 18

    >
    > Wombats: The mats used by Taxi drivers to keep their cars clean for
    > very important deliveries.


    Good one. Taxi drivers hate those deliveries.

    Wombats are an Australian marsupial. A full description is at
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wombat

    Australia tends to have a marsupial equivalent for the "placental" animals
    of Europe. So we have marsupial wolves or marsupial moles. This seems to
    be because Australia became an island at a very early date, and evolution
    went down a different path here. The fact that we still have wolves or
    moles of some kind suggests that our marsupials were filling the same
    niches in the environment.

    Placental animals, like humans, develop inside the womb until they are
    strong enough to survive outside. Marsupial animals are born at an earlier
    stage of fetal development. I have read that a baby at birth can be only
    one or two inches long. They travel through the mother's fur to her pouch,
    and get hold of a teat. The mother expands that teat until it fills the
    baby's mouth and locks the baby on, then squirts the milk in, because the
    baby isn't strong enough to suck.

    The Koala is not a bear, but a marsupial possum. The ones you see tourists
    holding are relative babies. One night a full-grown one crossed the road
    in front of our car. It would have been as big as an adult wombat. If we
    had hit it, both would have suffered some damage. A boss of mine damaged
    his car in a collision with a wombat in South Eastern Victoria.

    There is a famous road warning sign in South Australia at the beginning of
    the Nullarbor ("no trees") Highway with icons of a camel, a wombat and a
    kangaroo and the distance along which you will find them: "Next 88 Km." It
    is on Google Images.

    Doug Laidlaw,
    Bendigo, Vic Australia ("The Centrepiece of Victoria")
    Registered Linux user.
    --
    We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.
    - Winston Churchill


  6. Re: interested in wombats

    On Thursday 30 November 2006 03:51, Doug Laidlaw stood up and addressed the
    masses in /alt.os.linux.mandrake/ as follows...:

    > Australia tends to have a marsupial equivalent for the "placental" animals
    > of Europe. So we have marsupial wolves or marsupial moles. This seems to
    > be because Australia became an island at a very early date, and evolution
    > went down a different path here. The fact that we still have wolves or
    > moles of some kind suggests that our marsupials were filling the same
    > niches in the environment.


    Are you sure about those marsupial wolves still existing, Doug? For what
    I've read about them - or at least, the ones called "Tasmanian tiger"
    because of their stripes - the last one died in captivity (in a zoo) in
    1937.

    So if marsupial wolves still exist, then there must have been more than one
    subspecies of them. Of course, I'm not an Australian myself, which is why
    I'm asking you about it. I've had a relationship with an Australian women
    once, but she had never even heard of the Tasmanian tiger. She did know a
    lot of the details on other marsupial species, though.

    Allegedly, the sheep herders had caused their extinction because they were
    believed to have been attacking sheep, which caused a massive hunt for
    Tasmanian tigers to go on for several years. A false premise, as it would
    later turn out, as the sheep may have been attacked by Tasmanian devils
    instead.

    Oh, and by the way, I was also surprised to hear that Australia is not the
    only part of the world with marsupial animals. Allegedly, there are a few
    (smaller ones) of those on the American continent as well, but I forgot
    whether it's North America or South America.

    --
    With kind regards,

    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  7. Re: interested in wombats

    * Aragorn [2006-11-30]:
    >
    > Oh, and by the way, I was also surprised to hear that Australia is not the
    > only part of the world with marsupial animals. Allegedly, there are a few
    > (smaller ones) of those on the American continent as well, but I forgot
    > whether it's North America or South America.
    >

    [..msg snipped..]
    __________________________________________________ ___________
    Thu Nov 30 13:32:47 CST 2006

    We have a fairly good saturation of "possums" Aragorn, but they seem
    out of step with the majority of our critters.

    Opossum \O*pos"sum\, n. [Of N. American Indian origin.]
    Any American marsupial of the genera {Didelphys} and
    {Chironectes}. The common species of the United States is
    {Didelphys Virginiana}.

    --
    Olly P "On the Gulf of Mexico"

  8. Re: interested in wombats

    OllyP wrote:
    > * Aragorn [2006-11-30]:
    >> Oh, and by the way, I was also surprised to hear that Australia is not the
    >> only part of the world with marsupial animals. Allegedly, there are a few
    >> (smaller ones) of those on the American continent as well, but I forgot
    >> whether it's North America or South America.
    >>

    > [..msg snipped..]
    > __________________________________________________ ___________
    > Thu Nov 30 13:32:47 CST 2006
    >
    > We have a fairly good saturation of "possums" Aragorn, but they seem
    > out of step with the majority of our critters.
    >
    > Opossum \O*pos"sum\, n. [Of N. American Indian origin.]
    > Any American marsupial of the genera {Didelphys} and
    > {Chironectes}. The common species of the United States is
    > {Didelphys Virginiana}.
    >


    And they are working their way north. Although originally found only in
    the southern US, they tend to hitchhike north on trucks of produce.
    They are managing to cope with Canadian winters and are becoming more
    common here.

    Donald

  9. Re: interested in wombats

    On 2006-11-30, Donald Tees wrote:
    > OllyP wrote:
    >> * Aragorn [2006-11-30]:
    >>> Oh, and by the way, I was also surprised to hear that Australia is not the
    >>> only part of the world with marsupial animals. Allegedly, there are a few
    >>> (smaller ones) of those on the American continent as well, but I forgot
    >>> whether it's North America or South America.
    >>>

    >> [..msg snipped..]
    >> __________________________________________________ ___________
    >> Thu Nov 30 13:32:47 CST 2006
    >>
    >> We have a fairly good saturation of "possums" Aragorn, but they seem
    >> out of step with the majority of our critters.
    >>
    >> Opossum \O*pos"sum\, n. [Of N. American Indian origin.]
    >> Any American marsupial of the genera {Didelphys} and
    >> {Chironectes}. The common species of the United States is
    >> {Didelphys Virginiana}.
    >>

    >
    > And they are working their way north. Although originally found only in
    > the southern US, they tend to hitchhike north on trucks of produce.
    > They are managing to cope with Canadian winters and are becoming more
    > common here.


    Some were _deliberately_ brought from south-eastern USA to
    the Pacific Northwest to use for food. Now, they're all
    over the place. :-( My wife admits some of her ancestors
    were probably among those who brought the varmints.

    In Oregon, there's a new answer to the old question:

    Q: Why did the chicken cross the road?

    A: To show the possum it could be done.

    --
    Robert Riches
    spamtrap42@verizon.net
    (Yes, that is one of my email addresses.)

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