[OT] Hardware question - Mandrake

This is a discussion on [OT] Hardware question - Mandrake ; Okay guys, it's that time of the year again when I have to ask a question myself, and given that we've all known eachother for quite a while already, I prefer to ask here over any other group... ;-) The ...

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Thread: [OT] Hardware question

  1. [OT] Hardware question

    Okay guys, it's that time of the year again when I have to ask a question
    myself, and given that we've all known eachother for quite a while already,
    I prefer to ask here over any other group... ;-)

    The thing is - I've mentioned it a few times before already - that I'm going
    to have someone build me a new system, and as I said before, I'm really
    going to go crazy on this one - I have my reasons for going crazy... ;-)

    Now, as you may remember from my saying it earlier, I'm aiming for the Tyan
    Thunder K8QW (S4881) motherboard, which can (and will) harbor four
    dual-core Opteron 8xx processors. I'm not sure on the clock speed yet, but
    I'm probably going to go for the 865 HE (1.8 GHz) or 860 HE (1.6 GHz)
    models. The HE version of the Opteron only consumes 55 Watts, while the
    regular models consume 95 Watts and thus generate more heat. With eight
    cores and a bunch of SCSI hard disks, you want it as cool as possible. ;-)

    According to what I've read, a 1.8 GHz AMD should more or less perform
    similarly to a 2.8 GHz Intel, and so even at 1.6 GHz I would already have a
    higher per-CPU performance than with the 2.2 GHz 32-bit Xeons I have now,
    not to mention that the new one will be a 64-bit machine running a 64-bit
    distribution, of course.

    Now, the thing is that this particular Tyan motherboard supports three types
    of DDR-1 modules: DDR-400 (pc3200), DDR-333 (pc2700) and DDR-266 (pc2100).
    With DDR-400, you can install 32 GB. With DDR-333 or DDR-266, you can
    however install 64 GB.

    And this is where I'm sort of at a knot... I'm not the kind of guy who buys
    a new machine every year or even every two or three years - I'm actually
    hoping for a five to ten year longevity for this ultimate dream machine -
    and so I would actually prefer having 64 GB installed - given Moore's Law
    and all... ;-)

    Yet, what I don't know is whether the difference in speed between DDR-400
    and DDR-333 is actually something you feel - as opposed to cold benchmark
    numbers - so this is what I'm appealing to your own experiences and
    knowledge for. I also don't know too well what the best choice would be
    with regard to the chosen processor clock speed, etc.

    Any ideas?

    --
    With kind regards,

    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  2. Re: [OT] Hardware question

    On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 19:09:54 +0000, Aragorn wrote:

    > My initial order - for the Tyan/AMD-based machine - was placed late
    > September 2001, and this machine here - based upon an Intel motherboard
    > and two Xeons - was delivered to me late March 2004... Also, this
    > machine doesn't even have an AGP slot. Intel did have motherboards of
    > this category with AGP, but the word with that company was that "they
    > couldn't get those"...


    Damn why don't you just build your own? Does the country you're in have
    good vendors? How about NewEgg? Do they service your area?

    I find the build it myself has a lot of advantages. One since you have
    your head under the hood a good while you can spot any potential trouble
    areas ahead of time. Two, you can research what you are buying ahead of
    time and eliminate the buggy or not supported options.

    All of the suppliers I use here all are very good about returns. Most
    I've ever lost is $6-7 for return shipping. I won't do business with
    anyone that charges restocking fees. The competition is so fierce here
    that companies can't afford to get a bad reputation so most take returns
    no serious questions asked.

    My first PC was a Compaq. Grrr...on that one.

    Next one, a year later was custom built by a company. That one lasted a
    good while but since then I've built 12-15 machines myself I guess.

    I bet stuff is really cheap for Wayne over in Japan.

  3. Re: [OT] Hardware question

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 19:09:54 +0000, Aragorn wrote:
    >
    >> My initial order - for the Tyan/AMD-based machine - was placed late
    >> September 2001, and this machine here - based upon an Intel
    >> motherboard and two Xeons - was delivered to me late March 2004...
    >> Also, this machine doesn't even have an AGP slot. Intel did have
    >> motherboards of this category with AGP, but the word with that
    >> company was that "they couldn't get those"...

    >
    > Damn why don't you just build your own? Does the country you're in
    > have good vendors? How about NewEgg? Do they service your area?
    >
    > I find the build it myself has a lot of advantages. One since you
    > have your head under the hood a good while you can spot any potential
    > trouble areas ahead of time. Two, you can research what you are
    > buying ahead of time and eliminate the buggy or not supported
    > options.
    >
    > All of the suppliers I use here all are very good about returns. Most
    > I've ever lost is $6-7 for return shipping. I won't do business with
    > anyone that charges restocking fees. The competition is so fierce
    > here that companies can't afford to get a bad reputation so most take
    > returns no serious questions asked.
    >
    > My first PC was a Compaq. Grrr...on that one.
    >
    > Next one, a year later was custom built by a company. That one lasted
    > a good while but since then I've built 12-15 machines myself I guess.
    >
    >
    > I bet stuff is really cheap for Wayne over in Japan.


    I have noticed that the machines co-workers and friends bring me to
    work on are mostly Compaq's. At least now I know exactly where to look
    for drivers and such, as they only bring me the machine and the original
    install disk. And somewhere along the line they have had the video,
    sound, and modem upgraded and *those* drivers were left at home.
    Such is life.

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