Processor and MB change = possible ? - Mandrake

This is a discussion on Processor and MB change = possible ? - Mandrake ; Hi, I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7. I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are ...

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Thread: Processor and MB change = possible ?

  1. Processor and MB change = possible ?

    Hi,
    I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7.
    I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK
    But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are based on
    dual core technologie.
    Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)
    If not, is there any multi-core or multi-processor hardware able to
    "simulate" a unique processor ? (without vmware)
    I did not find any documentation from intel (with there new
    "virtualization" technology) that can help me.
    I think i'm not the only one in that case because of the thousands of
    linux servers runing !

    Regards

    Yves


  2. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?

    On Monday 13 November 2006 17:58, Prot88 stood up and addressed the masses
    in /alt.os.linux.mandrake/ as follows...:

    > Hi,
    > I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7.
    > I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK
    > But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are based on
    > dual core technologie.
    > Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    > don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)


    That depends on whether an SMP kernel was installed. If it wasn't, see
    whether one is supplied on your original installation disks. Do however
    bear in mind that you'd still be using a 32-bit operating system (and
    kernel) on a 64-bit machine.

    By the way, if the machine has more than 1 GB of RAM installed, you'd need
    the "Enterprise" kernel instead of the SMP kernel. It supports up to 4 GB
    of RAM and it's SMP-enabled.

    > If not, is there any multi-core or multi-processor hardware able to
    > "simulate" a unique processor ? (without vmware)
    > I did not find any documentation from intel (with there new
    > "virtualization" technology) that can help me.
    > I think i'm not the only one in that case because of the thousands of
    > linux servers runing !


    If you really need more power, I would suggest installing a new distro on a
    new machine, and migrating your data to the new machine one step at the
    time. Then, when the full transition is made, you can take the "old"
    machine off-line.

    --
    With kind regards,

    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  3. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?

    Aragorn a écrit :

    > > Hi,
    > > I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7.
    > > I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK
    > > But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are based on
    > > dual core technologie.
    > > Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    > > don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)

    >
    > That depends on whether an SMP kernel was installed. If it wasn't, see
    > whether one is supplied on your original installation disks. Do however
    > bear in mind that you'd still be using a 32-bit operating system (and
    > kernel) on a 64-bit machine.



    Yes, but even 50% better is good for me.


    > By the way, if the machine has more than 1 GB of RAM installed, you'd need
    > the "Enterprise" kernel instead of the SMP kernel. It supports up to 4 GB
    > of RAM and it's SMP-enabled.


    How can I find my mandrake SMP version ?? (if I can)

    > > If not, is there any multi-core or multi-processor hardware able to
    > > "simulate" a unique processor ? (without vmware)
    > > I did not find any documentation from intel (with there new
    > > "virtualization" technology) that can help me.
    > > I think i'm not the only one in that case because of the thousands of
    > > linux servers runing !

    > If you really need more power, I would suggest installing a new distro ona
    > new machine, and migrating your data to the new machine one step at the
    > time. Then, when the full transition is made, you can take the "old"
    > machine off-line.


    Sure again. Thinking of that. But this server has many services not so
    easy to install (web,ftp,dns,mail,anti-spam... etc). The cost (an the
    risk) of powerfull hardware is lower than many installation hours.

    Thanks for your response

    Regards

    Yves


  4. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?

    On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 00:46:49 -0800, Prot88 wrote:

    > How can I find my mandrake SMP version ?? (if I can)
    >

    uname -a
    man uname

    > Sure again. Thinking of that. But this server has many services not so
    > easy to install (web,ftp,dns,mail,anti-spam... etc). The cost (an the
    > risk) of powerfull hardware is lower than many installation hours.
    >

    The main problem you're going to have is kernel support for the newer
    hardware. More than likely, mdk 7.0 will not have support for the newer
    MB chipsets, so you would need to compile a newer kernel prior to changing
    the MB or use an older dual socket MB, which imo wouldn't be an option.
    Upgrading the kernel alone shouldn't affect your services. Installing a
    newer distro which would include later versions of the services will
    likely require new config files and can be a real pita. So, you have a
    choice. Either just upgrade the kernel and use your older apps, or backup
    all your config files, Install a new distro and get everything configured
    again. Either way is going to present a bit of work. If these services
    need to be running 24/7 with as little down time as possible, then a
    complete new tested system would be the only option imo.

    --
    Want the ultimate in free OTA SD/HDTV Recorder? http://mythtv.org
    http://mysettopbox.tv/knoppmyth.html Usenet alt.video.ptv.mythtv
    My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
    HD Tivo S3 compared http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/mythtivo.htm


  5. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?

    Prot88 wrote:

    > Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    > don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)


    If uptime is of any importance you pretty much have to replace that
    machine. Any experimenting you try with kernels etc. can bring the
    machine down unexpectedly. Even assuming you get a newer SMP running on
    it, when you swap the motherboard any number of things could go wrong
    and your critical server would be offline for who knows how long.

    Your critical server and distro are 5 years old. Disks and power
    supplies are going to start failing soon in any case. Time to build a
    new machine with Mandriva 2007 or some other modern distro, copy over
    important programs and data from the old machine, test extensively, and
    then replace the old machine with the new one.

    Regards,

    David Mathog

  6. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?

    On Tuesday 14 November 2006 09:46, Prot88 stood up and addressed the masses
    in /alt.os.linux.mandrake/ as follows...:

    > Aragorn a écrit :
    >
    >> > Hi,
    >> > I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7.
    >> > I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK
    >> > But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are based on
    >> > dual core technologie.
    >> > Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    >> > don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)

    >>
    >> That depends on whether an SMP kernel was installed. If it wasn't, see
    >> whether one is supplied on your original installation disks. Do however
    >> bear in mind that you'd still be using a 32-bit operating system (and
    >> kernel) on a 64-bit machine.

    >
    > Yes, but even 50% better is good for me.


    Well, Mandrake 7.0 is already archaic by now, and chances are that the
    software installed on that machine has some severe security leaks which
    have in the meantime already been resolved.

    My advice would therefore be to install the new machine with a newer
    distribution, and to slowly but gradually migrate your data to the newer
    machine. It's a time-consuming process and it will be a lot of work, but
    the end-result will be so much more rewarding, when you finally have
    migrated everything and it'll be running off a stable 64-bit machine. ;-)

    >> By the way, if the machine has more than 1 GB of RAM installed, you'd
    >> need the "Enterprise" kernel instead of the SMP kernel. It supports up
    >> to 4 GB of RAM and it's SMP-enabled.

    >
    > How can I find my mandrake SMP version ?? (if I can)


    There should be a kernel package on the installation CD/DVD of which the
    name ends in /-mdksmp/ or /-mdkenterprise./

    Normally however, the installer will detect whether the machine has more
    than one CPU and will install an SMP kernel, or if applicable, an
    Enterprise kernel on machines with more than 1 GB of physical memory.

    >> > If not, is there any multi-core or multi-processor hardware able to
    >> > "simulate" a unique processor ? (without vmware)
    >> > I did not find any documentation from intel (with there new
    >> > "virtualization" technology) that can help me.
    >> > I think i'm not the only one in that case because of the thousands of
    >> > linux servers runing !

    >>
    >> If you really need more power, I would suggest installing a new distro on
    >> a new machine, and migrating your data to the new machine one step at the
    >> time. Then, when the full transition is made, you can take the "old"
    >> machine off-line.

    >
    > Sure again. Thinking of that. But this server has many services not so
    > easy to install (web,ftp,dns,mail,anti-spam... etc). The cost (an the
    > risk) of powerfull hardware is lower than many installation hours.


    Yes, I would agree that it's a tough job, but think of the rewarding
    end-result. And nobody says that you have to do it overnight, either. ;-)

    Just take it slow and move stuff over gradually. Test the machine's set-up
    on your LAN, and when everything runs smoothly, set your router up so that
    it accesses the new machine for the services you've already set up again as
    stable on the new machine, while you keep it pointing to the old machine
    for the stuff that hasn't been migrated yet, or that isn't set up securely
    yet on the new one.

    > Thanks for your response


    You're welcome. ;-)

    --
    With kind regards,

    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  7. Re: Processor and MB change = possible ?


    Aragorn a écrit :

    > On Tuesday 14 November 2006 09:46, Prot88 stood up and addressed the masses
    > in /alt.os.linux.mandrake/ as follows...:
    >
    > > Aragorn a écrit :
    > >
    > >> > Hi,
    > >> > I have a very reliable five year old linux server with Mandrake 7.
    > >> > I have already upgraded hardware from P4 1,5 Ghz to P4 3,2 ghz = OK
    > >> > But, now, I need more power. But, recent Intel processors are basedon
    > >> > dual core technologie.
    > >> > Will this old mandrake use one or two core ??? (without recompile = I
    > >> > don't want to change anything on this VERY important server)
    > >>
    > >> That depends on whether an SMP kernel was installed. If it wasn't, see
    > >> whether one is supplied on your original installation disks. Do however
    > >> bear in mind that you'd still be using a 32-bit operating system (and
    > >> kernel) on a 64-bit machine.

    > >
    > > Yes, but even 50% better is good for me.

    >
    > Well, Mandrake 7.0 is already archaic by now, and chances are that the
    > software installed on that machine has some severe security leaks which
    > have in the meantime already been resolved.
    >
    > My advice would therefore be to install the new machine with a newer
    > distribution, and to slowly but gradually migrate your data to the newer
    > machine. It's a time-consuming process and it will be a lot of work, but
    > the end-result will be so much more rewarding, when you finally have
    > migrated everything and it'll be running off a stable 64-bit machine. ;-)
    >
    > >> By the way, if the machine has more than 1 GB of RAM installed, you'd
    > >> need the "Enterprise" kernel instead of the SMP kernel. It supports up
    > >> to 4 GB of RAM and it's SMP-enabled.

    > >
    > > How can I find my mandrake SMP version ?? (if I can)

    >
    > There should be a kernel package on the installation CD/DVD of which the
    > name ends in /-mdksmp/ or /-mdkenterprise./
    >
    > Normally however, the installer will detect whether the machine has more
    > than one CPU and will install an SMP kernel, or if applicable, an
    > Enterprise kernel on machines with more than 1 GB of physical memory.
    >
    > >> > If not, is there any multi-core or multi-processor hardware able to
    > >> > "simulate" a unique processor ? (without vmware)
    > >> > I did not find any documentation from intel (with there new
    > >> > "virtualization" technology) that can help me.
    > >> > I think i'm not the only one in that case because of the thousands of
    > >> > linux servers runing !
    > >>
    > >> If you really need more power, I would suggest installing a new distroon
    > >> a new machine, and migrating your data to the new machine one step at the
    > >> time. Then, when the full transition is made, you can take the "old"
    > >> machine off-line.

    > >
    > > Sure again. Thinking of that. But this server has many services not so
    > > easy to install (web,ftp,dns,mail,anti-spam... etc). The cost (an the
    > > risk) of powerfull hardware is lower than many installation hours.

    >
    > Yes, I would agree that it's a tough job, but think of the rewarding
    > end-result. And nobody says that you have to do it overnight, either. ;-)
    >
    > Just take it slow and move stuff over gradually. Test the machine's set-up
    > on your LAN, and when everything runs smoothly, set your router up so that
    > it accesses the new machine for the services you've already set up again as
    > stable on the new machine, while you keep it pointing to the old machine
    > for the stuff that hasn't been migrated yet, or that isn't set up securely
    > yet on the new one.
    >
    > > Thanks for your response

    >
    > You're welcome. ;-)
    >
    > --
    > With kind regards,
    >
    > *Aragorn*
    > (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)


    Thanks to you all. So, I think I will install a new distro on a
    mega-powerfull hardware to be quiet for then next 10 years :-).
    Liters of cofee needed....

    Yves


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