Moving to Linux - Mandrake

This is a discussion on Moving to Linux - Mandrake ; Hi, I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the plunge. I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c ...

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Thread: Moving to Linux

  1. Moving to Linux

    Hi,

    I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    plunge.

    I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    storage.

    I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will
    I be able to access the drive d?

    I currently run Outlook for email etc, can I back up my mail and folders
    to a pst file to the drive d and then access them from a mail client in
    linux, maybe import them in?

    Is it the operating system or graphics card that controls the refresh
    rate in linux? I've tried mandriva 2007 from one of these live cd's
    which I boot into to. I currently run my xp desktop as 1280 x 1024 @
    75hz @ 32bit color but I notice that Madriva only allows me the same
    resolution @ 24bit color and @ only 60hz so the display does not seem as
    sharp. Is this a linux thing or a mandriva thing? I notice it is using
    a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper resolution
    if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers from nvidia?

    If I use this Wine app for running windows apps then can these apps also
    access the internet while they run?

    And a suse question - I currently have 9.2 install cd's, if I install
    these then is there an updating system that will let me update to 10.1
    from the 9.2?

    Thanks in advance,

    toe

  2. Re: Moving to Linux

    toedipper wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux,


    Boring... why is everyone moving *from* XP *to* Linux while no one seems to
    move the other way? It's getting crowded here, don't you think?

  3. Re: Moving to Linux

    toedipper writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    > have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make
    > the plunge.


    Be patient.

    > I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    > installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    > storage.
    >
    > I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do
    > will I be able to access the drive d?


    You can read NTFS, you normally can't write to it.
    Google for more info.
    Since it doesn't look like you'll have NT on this system,
    I think you'll be better off using a Linux filesystem.
    If you change it to FAT, you can read and write it.

    > I currently run Outlook for email etc, can I back up my mail and
    > folders to a pst file to the drive d and then access them from a mail
    > client in linux, maybe import them in?


    Don't know.

    > Is it the operating system or graphics card that controls the refresh
    > rate in linux? I've tried mandriva 2007 from one of these live cd's
    > which I boot into to. I currently run my xp desktop as 1280 x 1024 @
    > 75hz @ 32bit color but I notice that Madriva only allows me the same
    > resolution @ 24bit color and @ only 60hz so the display does not seem
    > as sharp. Is this a linux thing or a mandriva thing? I notice it is


    Neither Linux nor Mandriva.
    Most distros use "xorg" to drive the display.
    If there's a problem, it's a problem with xorg.

    > using a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper
    > resolution if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers
    > from nvidia?


    The nvidia drivers are way more capable than the native ones.

    > If I use this Wine app for running windows apps then can these apps
    > also access the internet while they run?


    If the app works under Wine it should have no problem with internet
    access.

    > And a suse question - I currently have 9.2 install cd's, if I install
    > these then is there an updating system that will let me update to 10.1
    > from the 9.2?


    A Suse question to the Mandrake group?

  4. Re: Moving to Linux

    On 2006-11-01, toedipper wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    > have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    > plunge.
    >
    > I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    > installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    > storage.


    > I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will
    > I be able to access the drive d?


    Yes, but only to read the NTFS partition. Don't depend on being able to
    write to the NTFS partition from any OS other than Windows XP.

    Could you make room on what Windows calls the C: drive so that both
    Windows and Linux can be installed at the same time, as a 'dual boot'?
    This way you'll still have your familiar Windows OS to use while you become
    familiar with Linux. That's how most people make the transition. You get
    to choose which OS to run, each time you boot or re-boot the machine.

    Making a dual boot installation of Mandriva with Windows is easy, once
    you've made sure that there is room. Mandriva fits easily into 6GB of
    disc space, and you'll need a Linux swap partition too - say, as much swap
    space as you have RAM, as a rough guide.

    > I currently run Outlook for email etc, can I back up my mail and folders
    > to a pst file to the drive d and then access them from a mail client in
    > linux, maybe import them in?


    I don't know about .pst files; is that a Microsoft-only format? Kmail can
    certainly import Outlook Express .dbx and .mbx files.

    > Is it the operating system or graphics card that controls the refresh
    > rate in linux?


    That would be the graphics driver, in combination with the hardware.

    > I've tried mandriva 2007 from one of these live cd's
    > which I boot into to. I currently run my xp desktop as 1280 x 1024 @
    > 75hz @ 32bit color but I notice that Madriva only allows me the same
    > resolution @ 24bit color and @ only 60hz so the display does not seem as
    > sharp. Is this a linux thing or a mandriva thing? I notice it is using
    > a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper resolution
    > if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers from nvidia?


    You can install the proprietary Nvidia Linux driver. I don't know if that
    would give you a refresh rate of 75Hz with your hardware. You may have to
    adjust some of the display settings to suit your preferences.

    Microsoft habitually refer to '32 bit colour', but that is not a valid
    'colour depth'; only 24 bits per pixel can actually be used. (As I
    understand it).

    > If I use this Wine app for running windows apps then can these apps also
    > access the internet while they run?


    If they run at all, yes. Assume that no Windows program will run in Wine,
    until you've proved otherwise for yourself - don't just accept assurances
    from others that such-and-such a program works with Wine without trying it
    for yourself first.

    > And a suse question - I currently have 9.2 install cd's, if I install
    > these then is there an updating system that will let me update to 10.1
    > from the 9.2?


    That sounds like a question for a SuSE group ) With Mandriva,
    trying to update from one major version to the next is theoretically
    possible, but a 'fresh install' is usually less troublesome. I'm
    currently running my old Mdv2005 system while I get Mdv2007 working
    satisfactorily; both are installed on the same laptop, as a 'dual boot',
    with my data in a partition of its own.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~

  5. Re: Moving to Linux

    On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 21:31:27 +0000, toedipper wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    > have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    > plunge.
    >
    > I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    > installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    > storage.
    >
    > I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will
    > I be able to access the drive d?


    yes - you will be able to read it. Writing is still a little problematic.

    >
    > I currently run Outlook for email etc, can I back up my mail and folders
    > to a pst file to the drive d and then access them from a mail client in
    > linux, maybe import them in?
    >
    > Is it the operating system or graphics card that controls the refresh
    > rate in linux? I've tried mandriva 2007 from one of these live cd's
    > which I boot into to. I currently run my xp desktop as 1280 x 1024 @
    > 75hz @ 32bit color but I notice that Madriva only allows me the same
    > resolution @ 24bit color and @ only 60hz so the display does not seem as
    > sharp. Is this a linux thing or a mandriva thing? I notice it is using
    > a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper resolution
    > if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers from nvidia?


    It will definitely work better with the proprietary nvidia drivers. It is
    my understanding that with Linux 24bit and 32bit are basically the same
    thing - three bytes. I never understood exactly what 32bit color meant,
    since 32 is not divisible by 3, and there are three primary colors - RGB.

    >
    > If I use this Wine app for running windows apps then can these apps also
    > access the internet while they run?


    Probably, but IMHO it's MUCH better to find linux replacements - what apps
    did you have in mind?

    >
    > And a suse question - I currently have 9.2 install cd's, if I install
    > these then is there an updating system that will let me update to 10.1
    > from the 9.2?


    You may get there if you go 9.2 to 10.0 then 10.0 to 10.1. I'd be
    surprised if it did 9.2 to 10.1 directly.

    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > toe



  6. Re: Moving to Linux

    toedipper wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    > have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    > plunge.
    >
    > I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    > installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    > storage.
    >
    > I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will
    > I be able to access the drive d?
    >

    As already told, ntfs - due to Microsoft not revealing the specs and
    changing "just a little thing" now and then - cannot be written safely from
    linux, therefore it's disabled by default. I use ntfs-3g and it appears to
    work fine, but still and probably forever "beta".
    You should rather begin small and let linux (Mandriiva will do it, most
    recent SuSe as well) shrink your XP partition on the first drive somewhat.
    Housecleaning and defragging from within windows, before you attempt to
    install inux, has never proved wrong.

    > I currently run Outlook for email etc, can I back up my mail and folders
    > to a pst file to the drive d and then access them from a mail client in
    > linux, maybe import them in?
    >

    The best way I can think of is to install firefox (can import your IE
    favorites) and thunderbird (can import your OE e-mails) in windows.
    You will be able to copy these databases over to linux then, or import them
    with the linux versions of firefox/thunderbird.

    > Is it the operating system or graphics card that controls the refresh
    > rate in linux? I've tried mandriva 2007 from one of these live cd's
    > which I boot into to. I currently run my xp desktop as 1280 x 1024 @
    > 75hz @ 32bit color but I notice that Madriva only allows me the same
    > resolution @ 24bit color and @ only 60hz so the display does not seem as
    > sharp. Is this a linux thing or a mandriva thing? I notice it is using


    You probably have a flatscreen, otherwise you should get a higher frequency.
    And flatscreens run best with 60Hz, not 75.
    Or, the live cd just plays a safe game.
    24bit color (8bits per R/G/B) + 8bits black is the same as
    32bit in windows (8bits per R/G/B, and they include black).
    At least with Mandriva at the end of your install you can configure your
    graphic resolution and frequency, amongst other settings. And you can run
    XFdrake anytime from non-gui "commandline" to salvage any X-accident.

    > a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper resolution
    > if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers from nvidia?
    >

    The nvidia drivers are part of the "commercial" boxed version as well, but
    yes you can download them anytime from nvidia. You will need the kernel
    sources of your running linux as well, for the installer needs to compile a
    wrapper module.
    The nvidia driver gives you 3d acceleration and uses more builtin features
    of the card. But I don't think it will change resolution.

    > If I use this Wine app for running windows apps then can these apps also
    > access the internet while they run?
    >

    Yes, you won't have to bother.

    > And a suse question - I currently have 9.2 install cd's, if I install
    > these then is there an updating system that will let me update to 10.1
    > from the 9.2?
    >

    Not really recommended. I think, 9.2 is already out of service, and you
    would have to buy the box. You will rather want opensuse10.1 or what they
    just have.

    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17-mm1,Xorg7.1/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]

  7. Re: Moving to Linux

    ray wrote:

    > On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 21:31:27 +0000, toedipper wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I
    >> have a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    >> plunge.
    >>
    >> I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    >> installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    >> storage.
    >>
    >> I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will
    >> I be able to access the drive d?


    You don't have to jump off a cliff to learn to fly. You can transition a
    little more gradually if you like.

    Most distros can read but not write NTFS. After install, copy the contents
    of D: to C: (by that time it will be sdb1 to sda1), then remove the NTFS
    partition and replace it with a journalized EXT3 or JFS partition.

    Another option: Clean out clutter, move the data to C:, then install Linux
    on the second hard drive (D: = sdb) as dual boot. You'll have some time
    then with both systems available to sort stuff out, won't need wine, and
    when you're sure, you can simply reformat the C: drive (sda) to JFS. You
    could also place a vfat/FAT32 partition of just under 16 GB on that sdb/D:
    drive; both systems will be able to read and write that. (While Windows
    likes to run on the primary master hard drive, Linux really doesn't seem to
    care what disk it's on.)

    The machine I'm sitting at now has an 80 GB drive with Windows XP Pro on a
    55 GB NTFS partition and Mandrake 9.1 on two smaller partitions (JFS and
    Swap) of the same drive. A salvaged 9GB SCSI disk formatted to FAT32 can be
    read by both systems and I use it for moving pictures back and forth
    between Photoshop and The Gimp. (OK, they're Tuxracer courses. Aren't you
    glad you asked?) I still use Windows more than Linux, but Linux is growing
    a bit more comfortable all the time.

    >
    >> I notice it is using
    >> a generic geoforce FX 5200 driver but would I get the proper resolution
    >> if after installing linux I download proper linux drivers from nvidia?


    > It will definitely work better with the proprietary nvidia drivers. It is
    > my understanding that with Linux 24bit and 32bit are basically the same
    > thing - three bytes. I never understood exactly what 32bit color meant,
    > since 32 is not divisible by 3, and there are three primary colors - RGB.
    >


    In Windows at least, 32 bit color is really 24 bit color with eight wasted
    bits. This reconciles it with data addressing systems that assume a 32-bit
    integer "word." Many digital things work better when kept to powers of 2,
    and the notion of being stingey with bits seems to be a thing of the past.

    --
    P.
    Beware of cat claws. Neuroses can be contagious.

  8. Re: Moving to Linux

    Whiskers wrote:

    > Could you make room on what Windows calls the C: drive so that both
    > Windows and Linux can be installed at the same time, as a 'dual
    > boot'? This way you'll still have your familiar Windows OS to use
    > while you become familiar with Linux. That's how most people make
    > the transition. You get to choose which OS to run, each time you
    > boot or re-boot the machine.
    >
    > Making a dual boot installation of Mandriva with Windows is easy,
    > once you've made sure that there is room. Mandriva fits easily into
    > 6GB of disc space, and you'll need a Linux swap partition too - say,
    > as much swap space as you have RAM, as a rough guide.
    >


    I did something very similar. In my dual boot setup I created one
    partition I call Linwin which is used for data storage. Formatted as
    FAT32 both Linux and XP can read or write to it. Handy for those few XP
    applications like my scanner programming software which presently is
    Windows only. Having the data all together aids when doing backups as well.


  9. Re: Moving to Linux

    "toedipper" wrote in message
    news:Pm82h.18409$76.15795@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm moving from xp to Linux, either Mandriva 2007 or Suse 10.1 and I have
    > a few questions that hopefully someone can answer before I make the
    > plunge.
    >
    > I currently have 2 physical hard drives, c and d. c is where xp is
    > installed and d is formatted in ntfs format and I use it simply for
    > storage.
    >
    > I plan to clear the c completely and install linux on it, when I do will I
    > be able to access the drive d?
    >


    In my reply earlier I said something just a little bit wrong, but it was a
    typo kind of thing. I said your C: drive would become sda1, and so forth.
    Well, actually, the drive you're calling C: will be hda, and the partition
    on it will be hda1 (it would be sda and sda1 if it were a SCSI drive).

    The important point is this: when moving from Windows to Linux, you also
    need to stop thinking of your physical hard drives as C: and D:, which are
    drive letters for Windows "volumes." A "volume" can be a partition on the
    disk, or a device like a CD-ROM or floppy, or several partitions working
    together (RAID or a Dynamic Volume), or anything that stores data. But you
    have one large partition on each drive -- really common with Windows -- and
    you're used to thinking of the drive and its partition interchangeably.

    Linux will change how you see that. While Windows automatically assigns a
    drive letter to a partition and automatically "mounts" it as a separate
    entity, Linux gives you the opportunity to name the partition and "mount" it
    as if it were a folder in your directory tree. (You can do that in Windows,
    too, but it's not the default.) Hard drives will be identified as hda, hdb,
    hdc, etc., and the partitions on hda will be labeled hda1, hda2, etc.

    It's not technically as different as people make it out to be! But it is a
    different way of seeing things and plenty of Unix/Linux people think the
    Windows way is silly. I found Linux klunky for a while, but now I know my
    way around and feel perfectly comfortable in either system.

    --
    P.




  10. Re: Moving to Linux

    Walter Mautner a écrit :
    > toedipper wrote:
    >
    >
    >>....

    >
    > As already told, ntfs - due to Microsoft not revealing the specs and
    > changing "just a little thing" now and then - cannot be written safely from
    > linux, therefore it's disabled by default. I use ntfs-3g and it appears to
    > work fine, but still and probably forever "beta".
    > You should rather begin small and let linux (Mandriiva will do it, most
    > recent SuSe as well) shrink your XP partition on the first drive somewhat.
    > Housecleaning and defragging from within windows, before you attempt to
    > install inux, has never proved wrong.
    > ......
    >

    First of all, save your "registers" using regexp or similar before any
    change on C: !!!!!

  11. Re: Moving to Linux

    "Iordani" wrote in message
    news:4qski7Fodu6rU1@individual.net...
    > toedipper wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm moving from xp to Linux,

    >
    > Boring... why is everyone moving *from* XP *to* Linux while no one seems
    > to
    > move the other way? It's getting crowded here, don't you think?


    That's a little odd on the face of it, since Windows is so much more
    comfortable for common folk. But after you get over the implied sarcasm,
    there are three good answers to the question.

    First, Windows usually (and Mac practically always) comes installed as an
    OEM. Linux, by comparison, is nearly always installed by the user, often on
    a machine that had Windows as its OEM. So that flow is usually from Windows
    to Linux.

    Secondly, Linux has additional capabilities that require some technical
    skill and are only appreciated by the advanced user. So again, the flow is
    from Windows to Linux as users acquire those skills and tastes.

    Third, if someone moved the other way they wouldn't announce it here -- or
    if they did, they'd be denounced as Wintrolls. Windows people also don't
    look in the same kinds of places for support. In particular peer support is
    a Linux trademark and Windows rarity.

    People do move the other way -- usually by buying a new Windows machine, or
    buying one of the cheap Linspire type boxes and installing an academic copy
    of Windows.

    Me? I'm "expanding into," not "moving to" Linux. My main family computer
    is XP Home, this one is dual boot XP Pro and Mandrake, another old one is
    ME, and a fourth, my next-week project box, is Mandriva Linux only.

    --
    P.





  12. Re: Moving to Linux

    RoktRabt wrote:

    > Me? I'm "expanding into," not "moving to" Linux. My main family computer
    > is XP Home, this one is dual boot XP Pro and Mandrake, another old one is
    > ME, and a fourth, my next-week project box, is Mandriva Linux only.


    I made the migration some years ago - though I still have a couple of
    Windows installations here for testing purposes.

    My wife and I each have a laptop - she runs Kubuntu and I run Mandriva -
    both use our wireless network at home. I have a "main" desktop box in my
    study, which is used for most office work and developing software. It runs
    Mandriva most of the time, though there's a Debian disc and a couple of
    Windows partitions.

    There's also a Macintosh box here as well - it runs OSX and Slackware.

    There's a headless server in the cellar, which is used as a file server,
    multimedia server, and an automated backup system for work done elsewhere.
    That is running Debian.

    The neighbourhood we live in is predominantly peopled by orchestral
    musicians, teachers, scientists and journalists. *Nobody* in this street
    now "runs" Windows! This is _not_ my influence - it's just that folks
    around here have discovered for themselves that there are better
    alternatives to Gates-ware.

    I have provided some minor technical support for some of the neighbours, but
    they generally can run, configure and update their systems without any
    assistance, which shows that GNU/Linux *isn't* difficult to use and
    maintain, despite all the FUD.

    A quick local poll shows that the favourite distro is Ubuntu (in its'
    various guises), with Mandriva a close second. There are also a few Suse
    boxes around (usually the journalists - they use it at work too). There's
    also a strong Apple contingent amongst the musicians.

    The amount of technical knowledge required for successful use of GNU/Linux
    is _not_ as high as many believe. Modern distros make selection of
    repositories and automatic updates actually /easier/ than with Windows.

    There is a slightly different mindset required for the successful use of
    GNU/Linux - be prepared to learn a little. Windows tries to assume that
    the user is stupid, and presumes that "root" privilege is appropriate for
    all users. This leads to all the basic insecurities that render a
    network-connected Gates-ware box open to any and all abuse. It's
    always-on, fast broadband connections that have rendered Windows useless
    around here!

    C.


  13. Re: Moving to Linux

    On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 23:14:33 +0100, Iordani wrote:

    > toedipper wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm moving from xp to Linux,

    >
    > Boring... why is everyone moving *from* XP *to* Linux while no one seems to
    > move the other way? It's getting crowded here, don't you think?


    Some of us run both. I have Linux on my primary computer, put there
    primarily because my XP CD won't read and I couldn't afford downtime.
    I've grown accustomed to Linux.

    However, my job has me using applications that will only run in Windows
    and wont' run in Wine. I use these many times a day so I have both a
    laptop and a desktop that still both run XP.

    Each machine and OS has it's purpose.


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