Do you buy computer books? - Linux

This is a discussion on Do you buy computer books? - Linux ; I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would you consider ...

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Thread: Do you buy computer books?

  1. Do you buy computer books?


    I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    the web?

    --
    --Tim Smith

  2. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    So anyway, it was like, 08:47 CEST Oct 04 2007, you know? Oh, and, yeah,
    Tim Smith was all like, "Dude,

    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed
    > to learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how
    > to set up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like
    > that, would you consider buying a book, or would you get all your
    > information from the web?


    Going by past experience, I would probably get a book for the office
    bookshelf by habit and then look up the information I needed on the
    web anyway.

    Books are nice to hold in your hand and leaf through, but in the end I
    usually find the interweb better indexed.

    --
    Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana. Perth ---> *
    08:54:00 up 35 days, 22:55, 1 user, load average: 0.06, 0.06, 0.07
    Linux 2.6.22.5 x86_64 GNU/Linux Registered Linux user #261729

  3. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Tim Smith wrote:

    >
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >


    A book is a lot better for many things

    Yes, I buy (and have bought) many computer books
    --
    We are Linux. Resistance is measured in Ohms.


  4. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    On Oct 4, 12:47 am, Tim Smith wrote:
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >
    > --
    > --Tim Smith


    All the time.... Any time I'm starting a project using new or
    unfamiliar technology, I'll buy a book or two. I don't usually read
    all of them anymore. I pretty much just read enough to get started,
    and then use them as references (along with the web) to get my stuff
    done

    In fact, I just picked up two really fantastic books on SharePoint
    2007...

    --
    Tom Shelton


  5. Re: Do you buy computer books?

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    On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700,
    Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >



    Depends on the subject. The faster moving, the less likely I am to buy a
    book. But I do have a Safari subscription so that helps a lot.

    I will sometimes buy stuff like the Perl Cookbook, because it's fairly long
    lived, and I like having a physical book, but ebooks are so darn useful,
    even if they aren't as satisfying somehow.

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    --
    Jim Richardson http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
    If space is warped, time is all that's weft.

  6. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Jim Richardson wrote:

    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700,
    > Tim Smith wrote:


    >> I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? ..


    > I will sometimes buy stuff like the Perl Cookbook ..


    Sign on for a course at your local tech college, that way you get access
    to the library. Generally a college library has a much better selection
    than a book shop, which usually consist of 'TCP/IP for dummies' type of
    books ...

  7. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Verily I say unto thee, that Doug Mentohl spake thusly:

    > Sign on for a course at your local tech college, that way you get
    > access to the library. Generally a college library has a much better
    > selection than a book shop, which usually consist of 'TCP/IP for
    > dummies' type of books ...


    The "For Dummies" books make excellent joke gifts.

    I have bought, and will continue to buy, a lot of computing books over
    the years, but the problem is they become obsolete so quickly, which is
    why I end up turning to the Web eventually. Libraries are a good
    solution, but (round my way, at least) their stock tends to be not very
    current.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    14:22:32 up 56 days, 13:17, 2 users, load average: 0.02, 0.02, 0.00

  8. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    I believe books are the way to go until posters on the Web
    clean up their act. And almost certainly, indefinitely longer
    after that.

    In my view, Web materials are weak in two ways; one of these
    could (in an ideal world) be corrected.

    Web materials are too often posted with an incredible amount of
    rubbish thrown in. As I've been looking at sites lately, I commonly
    see pages made three columns across, vertical complexity, and
    the stuff I'm there for is thrown in almost as an afterthought in
    tiny tiny print. A recent device seems to be little panels that flash
    at you and then go away (these are almost never relevant and so
    further disturb the work). I can see younger people who grew up
    looking at this stuff, developing a tolerance for the rubbish; but in
    any case, tolerance or no, it takes energy to deal with that stuff
    and that energy can only become available by taking from the
    work in hand. So I think current Web pages practice is a very
    bad weakness to using these pages for any serious work. Such
    as, learning a new language or technology.

    The second weakness that I see to Web pages, is *they aren't
    paper.* The special advantage to paper is that you can scan large
    amounts of it quickly, looking for some small thing you need or
    recall. Web pages are limited to one screen at a time. Further, if
    you can write small sharp and concise, you can put very useful
    notes in the margins, as you cannot do with Web pages on your
    screen. And of course, you can carry a book with you that is
    smaller than a computer; and it doesn't need electricity nor any
    special workplace to use it. Isaac Asimov did a piece on this
    topic maybe fifty years ago. He did this in his typical Asimovian
    style, it's worthwhile to seek it out. So I believe books are here
    to stay.

    A third weakness comes to mind, especially with respect to
    Microsoft. Look up Francis Bacon's essays some time: written
    hundreds of years ago and highly readable today. How much of
    anything done Microsoft way will be readable in just half of one
    single century? And what technology did Bacon use to do his
    work? Thus text on paper is durable in a way computer
    technology cannot equal.

    Cheers -- Martha Adams [cola 2007 Oct 4]

    "Jim Richardson" wrote in message
    news:24met4-11j.ln1@dragon.myth...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700,
    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed
    >> to
    >> learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to
    >> set
    >> up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that,
    >> would
    >> you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information
    >> from
    >> the web?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Depends on the subject. The faster moving, the less likely I am to buy
    > a
    > book. But I do have a Safari subscription so that helps a lot.
    >
    > I will sometimes buy stuff like the Perl Cookbook, because it's fairly
    > long
    > lived, and I like having a physical book, but ebooks are so darn
    > useful,
    > even if they aren't as satisfying somehow.
    >
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
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    >
    > iD8DBQFHBKlid90bcYOAWPYRAhbTAKDp9Xgkw3qiZkdGkHIuI0 5+qCydqgCeKd7t
    > BBFf2KTvHX5VqaYH7QFD/jM=
    > =HRF0
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
    >
    > --
    > Jim Richardson http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
    > If space is warped, time is all that's weft.



  9. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Tim Smith wrote:
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >


    I am often required to demonstrate sources, or, present to my students
    the basis of facts. Books are real, websites are transient.

    The in-depth data or info, or sequence of steps that I require for
    anything complex or technical, is more often in the book.

    Unless the specific details are listed by someone in a forum or blog,
    entries on the Internet are often too general. Authors on the Internet
    tend to put out some of the facts that demonstrate their
    accomplishments, but, often lack details so that it could be replicated
    by others.

    http://bookpool.com has the discounts on tech. books that I prefer.


  10. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Tim Smith :
    >
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?


    I have a few books kicking around. The Bat Book and DNS and Bind and the
    Networking Bookshelf are ocassionally very useful. For PHP and MySQL I
    find the documentation on the web much easier to use than a book.

    --
    There was an old Scot named McTavish
    Who attempted an anthropoid ravish.
    The object of rape
    Was the wrong sex of ape,
    And the anthropoid ravished McTavish.

    http://www.websterscafe.com

  11. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    In article , Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >

    I used to buy loads of books. but,, Torrington Connecticut
    doesn't have a book store! When I lived in Willimantic there was a
    Waldenbooks and I bought books at least 3 times a year for Linux
    related topics as well as the Star Trek series (all 3 sub series)

    --

    From the Desk of the Sysop of:
    Planet Maca's Opus, a Free open BBS system. telnet://pinkrose.dhis.org
    Web Site: http://pinkrose.dhis.org, Dialup 860-618-3091 300-33600 bps
    The New Cnews maintainer
    B'ichela


  12. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    In article , Doug Mentohl wrote:
    > Sign on for a course at your local tech college, that way you get access
    > to the library. Generally a college library has a much better selection
    > than a book shop, which usually consist of 'TCP/IP for dummies' type of
    > books ...

    Depends on the College. the Northwestern Connecticut Community
    Technical College in Winsted doesn't require you to be a student to
    use its library. Just present your regular library card and your state
    issued ID and they will set you up to borrow books.
    As for bookstores and their choice of books to sell, it
    depends on the bookstore. Some really do cater to the more advanced
    topics, whereas the others.... you are lucky if you find a linux book
    worth buying.

    --

    From the Desk of the Sysop of:
    Planet Maca's Opus, a Free open BBS system. telnet://pinkrose.dhis.org
    Web Site: http://pinkrose.dhis.org, Dialup 860-618-3091 300-33600 bps
    The New Cnews maintainer
    B'ichela


  13. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:

    >
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?


    Books are a hell of a lot easier to take up and go on the bus.


  14. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    On Oct 4, 1:47 am, Tim Smith wrote:
    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >
    > --
    > --Tim Smith


    Depending on what I am wanting to learn about, the internet has most
    of the information already available to me. The only thing I can
    think where a book would come in handy, would be if you were learning
    a programming language.


  15. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:

    > I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    > learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    > up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    > you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    > the web?
    >


    Nope, not in years. Why would I need to? Traveling? Use a small laptop.

    --
    // This is my opinion.

  16. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    After takin' a swig o' grog, ray belched out this bit o' wisdom:

    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    >> I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    >> learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    >> up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    >> you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    >> the web?

    >
    > Books are a hell of a lot easier to take up and go on the bus.


    And the crapper.


  17. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    After takin' a swig o' grog, jebblue belched out this bit o' wisdom:

    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    >> I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? If you needed to
    >> learn a programming language, or how to administer Apache, or how to set
    >> up a RADIUS server for your organization, or something like that, would
    >> you consider buying a book, or would you get all your information from
    >> the web?
    >>

    >
    > Nope, not in years. Why would I need to? Traveling? Use a small laptop.


    Sounds like a short trip to me.

    (Although, the first time I ever installed Debian, on a no-name laptop,
    I did it while we were driving to Nashville. Power adaptor.)

    --
    Tux rox!

  18. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    Verily I say unto thee, that Linonut spake thusly:
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, jebblue belched out this bit o' wisdom:


    >> Nope, not in years. Why would I need to? Traveling? Use a small
    >> laptop.

    >
    > Sounds like a short trip to me.
    >
    > (Although, the first time I ever installed Debian, on a no-name
    > laptop, I did it while we were driving to Nashville. Power adaptor.)


    Then again, who reads "The Perl Cookbook" or "Managing IMAP"; in the
    back of a car, bus or train?

    The thing about technical manuals is that they lose their usefulness
    unless you have the actual equipment in front of you.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    00:23:02 up 56 days, 23:17, 2 users, load average: 0.02, 0.07, 0.07

  19. Re: Do you buy computer books?

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    On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 10:27:42 +0100,
    Doug Mentohl wrote:
    > Jim Richardson wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:47:09 -0700,
    >> Tim Smith wrote:

    >
    >>> I'm curious. Do people here still buy computer books? ..

    >
    >> I will sometimes buy stuff like the Perl Cookbook ..

    >
    > Sign on for a course at your local tech college, that way you get access
    > to the library. Generally a college library has a much better selection
    > than a book shop, which usually consist of 'TCP/IP for dummies' type of
    > books ...


    Not around here, between B&N, and the University book store, it's all
    covered. Although the U bookstore is sort of cheating I suppose.

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    --
    Jim Richardson http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
    "The beauty of the second amendment is that it will not be needed until
    they try to take it."
    --Thomas Jefferson

  20. Re: Do you buy computer books?

    After takin' a swig o' grog, [H]omer belched out this bit o' wisdom:

    > Verily I say unto thee, that Linonut spake thusly:
    >>
    >> (Although, the first time I ever installed Debian, on a no-name
    >> laptop, I did it while we were driving to Nashville. Power adaptor.)

    >
    > Then again, who reads "The Perl Cookbook" or "Managing IMAP"; in the
    > back of a car, bus or train?
    >
    > The thing about technical manuals is that they lose their usefulness
    > unless you have the actual equipment in front of you.


    Not quite. I read them for fun. Then, later, when I actually need to
    do something, I know right where to look.

    I might stop using books if they ever perfect a "clipboard" computer.

    --
    Tux rox!

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