yet another victim of Microsoft malware .. - Linux

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  1. yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    pornographic Web sites"

    "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    pornographic sites."

    http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top

  2. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    news:fe066l$qal$1@news.datemas.de...
    > "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    > unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    > pornographic Web sites"
    >
    > "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    > Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    > common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    > pornographic sites."
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    > http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top


    Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?

    jim



  3. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    jim wrote:

    >
    > "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    > news:fe066l$qal$1@news.datemas.de...
    >> "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    >> unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    >> pornographic Web sites"
    >>
    >> "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    >> Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    >> common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    >> pornographic sites."
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    >>

    http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top
    >
    > Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?
    >
    > jim


    Does not matter.
    Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like sites teaching
    knitting

    As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections spread
    like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that you don't
    even have to click for it
    --
    Microsoft? Is that some kind of a toilet paper?


  4. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    Peter Köhlmann wrote:
    > jim wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    >> news:fe066l$qal$1@news.datemas.de...
    >>> "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    >>> unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    >>> pornographic Web sites"
    >>>
    >>> "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the
    >>> computer. Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory
    >>> therapists' computer by a common and well-known Internet virus that
    >>> promotes fee-generating pornographic sites."
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    >>>

    > http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top
    >>
    >> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?
    >>
    >> jim

    >
    > Does not matter.
    > Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like sites teaching
    > knitting
    >
    > As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections
    > spread like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly"
    > that you don't even have to click for it



    Do you browse the web with Firefox? Best be careful then, 'cause
    CoolWebSearch may put porn links on your work computer desktop, too.
    Dumbkopf.

    http://news.antispyware.com/?p=33



  5. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    Peter Köhlmann wrote:

    > jim wrote:


    >> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?


    What are the odds of a male using a computer in a shared office and not
    surfing porn, getting fired and/or put in jail, a lot higher it seems.

    What are the odds of getting fired or put in jail because of some
    Windows malware. How good is a porn conviction going to look on the
    resume of a school teacher.

    "probably the most famous example of someone seemingly ensnared by
    malware is the criminal prosecution of substitute teacher Julie Amero"

    > Does not matter. Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like sites teaching knitting


    > As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections spread like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that you don't even have to click for it


    "All of the seven respiratory therapists share a small office divided
    into individual cubicles with one computer in the center of the room"

    Where's the indemnification for not getting put in jail for using a
    'computer' ...

  6. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    Verily I say unto thee, that jim spake thusly:

    > Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?


    What are the odds of a Windows machine being exploited by Malware?

    What are the odds that a computer forensics specialist doesn't know what
    he's doing?

    'Farr even retained a computer forensics specialist who concluded: "No
    one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    pornographic sites."'

    Blame the victim - it's easier than pursuing the truth.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    16:20:28 up 55 days, 15:15, 2 users, load average: 0.15, 0.05, 0.04

  7. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    On Oct 4, 2:55 am, "DFS" wrote:

    >
    > Do you browse the web with Firefox? Best be careful then, 'cause
    > CoolWebSearch may put porn links on your work computer desktop, too.
    > Dumbkopf.
    >


    Has to be running under Windows, though.




  8. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "Peter Köhlmann" wrote in message
    news:fe091s$fta$03$1@news.t-online.com...
    > jim wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    >> news:fe066l$qal$1@news.datemas.de...
    >>> "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    >>> unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    >>> pornographic Web sites"
    >>>
    >>> "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    >>> Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    >>> common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    >>> pornographic sites."
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    >>>

    > http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top
    >>
    >> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?
    >>
    >> jim

    >
    > Does not matter.
    > Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like sites teaching
    > knitting
    >
    > As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections spread
    > like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that you don't
    > even have to click for it


    But, I have yet to see an infection that ONLY places porn links in your
    favorites. In every case that I have seen, there are also popups and other
    hints that would lead the casual user to ask a supervisor, or network admin
    for help in removing the offensive materials.

    Now, I most certainly have now senn *all* malware in the wild, but I am very
    familiar with CWS as I own a company that does network administration for
    small businesses and we clean up this type of infestation on new client
    machines all the time.

    One question I would ask would be "Were there other (non-porn) favorites
    that the user did place in the favorites list?" If so, the odds of his
    simply overlooking the porn links and not reporting the problem would be
    almost nil.

    jim



  9. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    news:fe0b1f$j6c$1@news.datemas.de...
    > Peter Köhlmann wrote:
    >
    >> jim wrote:

    >
    >>> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?

    >
    > What are the odds of a male using a computer in a shared office and not
    > surfing porn, getting fired and/or put in jail, a lot higher it seems.
    >
    > What are the odds of getting fired or put in jail because of some Windows
    > malware. How good is a porn conviction going to look on the resume of a
    > school teacher.
    >
    > "probably the most famous example of someone seemingly ensnared by malware
    > is the criminal prosecution of substitute teacher Julie Amero"
    >
    >> Does not matter. Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like
    >> sites teaching knitting

    >
    >> As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections spread
    >> like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that you don't
    >> even have to click for it

    >
    > "All of the seven respiratory therapists share a small office divided into
    > individual cubicles with one computer in the center of the room"
    >
    > Where's the indemnification for not getting put in jail for using a
    > 'computer' ...


    It's called common sense. When you see popups of porn or porn links in the
    favorites list or even if you see that the PC is not adequately protected
    from viruses and malware, you should raise an alarm within the company -
    just as you would if you saw the doors being left unlocked when nobody was
    there over the weekend.

    Is it your responsibility to raise concerns before something bad happens?
    Legally speaking, probably not. Morally, ethically and by all common
    reasoning, most certainly.

    Courts offer opinions based on law, but they make decisions based on law +
    common sense. It is highly unlikely that this user did not notice ANY porn
    or ANY popups on the PC before he was fired - ESPECIALLY with CWS on the PC
    (which is what the fired worker's experts are claiming).

    I'd bet my job on it.

    jim



  10. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    jim wrote:

    >
    > "Peter Köhlmann" wrote in message
    > news:fe091s$fta$03$1@news.t-online.com...
    >> jim wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Doug Mentohl" wrote in message
    >>> news:fe066l$qal$1@news.datemas.de...
    >>>> "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    >>>> unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    >>>> pornographic Web sites"
    >>>>
    >>>> "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    >>>> Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by
    >>>> a common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    >>>> pornographic sites."
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    >>>>

    >>

    http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top
    >>>
    >>> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?
    >>>
    >>> jim

    >>
    >> Does not matter.
    >> Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like sites teaching
    >> knitting
    >>
    >> As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections spread
    >> like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that you don't
    >> even have to click for it

    >
    > But, I have yet to see an infection that ONLY places porn links in your
    > favorites.


    I don't care for your sightings. You are dumb enough to use OE

    < snip >
    --
    Windows - How do you want to be exploited today?


  11. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    ____/ [H]omer on Wednesday 03 October 2007 16:22 : \____

    > Verily I say unto thee, that jim spake thusly:
    >
    >> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?

    >
    > What are the odds of a Windows machine being exploited by Malware?
    >
    > What are the odds that a computer forensics specialist doesn't know what
    > he's doing?
    >
    > 'Farr even retained a computer forensics specialist who concluded: "No
    > one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the computer.
    > Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory therapists' computer by a
    > common and well-known Internet virus that promotes fee-generating
    > pornographic sites."'
    >
    > Blame the victim - it's easier than pursuing the truth.


    A bigger issue here is that Windows has led to loss of trust in computing and
    nothing that you ever see in a person's PC can be used as evidence (or /can/
    it?). Whenever things go rotten, the suspect will cry "malware!".

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | "Lions are like hippie tigers"
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    22:20:02 up 23 days, 20:26, 5 users, load average: 1.58, 2.14, 2.34
    http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project

  12. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    jim wrote:
    > "Peter Köhlmann" wrote...
    >> jim wrote:
    >>> "Doug Mentohl" wrote...
    >>>
    >>>> "Hospital respiratory therapist files lawsuit against hospital for
    >>>> unlawful termination, blaming computer malware for bookmarking
    >>>> pornographic Web sites"
    >>>>
    >>>> "No one had intentionally loaded the list of Web sites on the
    >>>> computer. Rather, the list was placed on the respiratory
    >>>> therapists' computer by a common and well-known Internet virus
    >>>> that promotes fee-generating pornographic sites."
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tinyurl.com/2nkr3m
    >>>
    >>> http://www.news.com/Police-Blotter-F...l?tag=nefd.top
    >>> Right... What are the odds of a male surfing porn on company time?

    >>
    >> Does not matter. Those links can be placed practically everwhere, like
    >> sites teaching knitting
    >>
    >> As windows is about as secure as a wet paper bag, those infections
    >> spread like wildfire. Windows is even so extremely "userfriendly" that
    >> you don't even have to click for it

    >
    > But, I have yet to see an infection that ONLY places porn links in your
    > favorites. In every case that I have seen, there are also popups and
    > other hints that would lead the casual user to ask a supervisor, or
    > network admin for help in removing the offensive materials.
    >
    > Now, I most certainly have now seen *all* malware in the wild, but I am
    > very familiar with CWS as I own a company that does network
    > administration for small businesses and we clean up this type of
    > infestation on new client machines all the time.
    >
    > One question I would ask would be "Were there other (non-porn) favorites
    > that the user did place in the favorites list?" If so, the odds of his
    > simply overlooking the porn links and not reporting the problem would
    > be almost nil.


    There are a couple common sense issues I see here. (Having worked in a
    hospital system helps.)

    1. He works in an all female unit in respiratory therapy. Computer was a
    shared resource located in the open. Computer is shared by all, there is a
    lack of privacy. To view pornographic material could be considered
    offensive to the nursing staff and a reason for sexual harassment
    complaint. I doubt seriously he was actively viewing pornography.

    2. Normal HR procedures are a warning to employee for first offence. If
    offence occurs again, then stricter measures are deployed. To have fired
    an employee on first offence is bad HR procedure, when less harsh measures
    will work. There was no mention of other evidence such as files found in
    browser cache, IP logs, etc.

    a. Some years ago, employees of the Sandia Laboratory in Albuquerque,
    New Mexico, US were fired. It was discovered that these employees had been
    actively viewing pornographous materials over a length of time, definite
    proof of guilt, not just a single occurrence.

    b. Lawyers are there to advise, it is the management that took
    action. It would not surprise me that management had already wanted to
    fire this person and was just looking for an excuse to.

    3. It seems the IT staff were not on their toes to block pornographous
    sites by their firewall.

    4. It also appears that the IT staff did not maintain adequate antiviral
    protection to block destructive worms.

    Hospitals make ideal candidates for Linux desktops, especially if they are
    using a Unix server for their data bases. If if were Linux, the likelihood
    of this occurrence would have been nil.

    --
    HPT

  13. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    Verily I say unto thee, that jim spake thusly:

    > When you give an untrained person ANYTHING, they can misuse it and
    > harm themselves and/or others. Such is the case with automobiles,
    > knives, guns, rocks, scissors, play dough, tiny magnets, pillows and
    > on and on.....
    >
    > The problem is that some people think that end user ignorance can be
    > coded around (i.e. UAC). That, somehow, programmers can make a
    > system that stupid users and malicious crimminals cannot destroy.
    > That, my friends, is a fantasy of the highest order.


    Pretty much what I've been saying for years. Computers are non-trivial
    machines that /require/ training to use properly. It's not a popular
    position, but it is nonetheless true.

    The likes of Gates and Jobs tried to commoditise PC's into domestic
    appliances that could be operated by monkeys. Well they got it /half/
    right ... PCs /are/ being operated by monkeys, but unfortunately PCs
    are now more complex than ever (but in different ways than before).

    The solution? Train the monkeys ... at gunpoint if necessary. Or ban
    them from ever touching computers, upon penalty of death.

    Banning Windows would also be useful, it would certainly force the
    monkeys to learn how to do things properly, with GNU/Linux.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    05:56:08 up 56 days, 4:51, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.04

  14. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "[H]omer" wrote in message news:ge8et4-1rt.ln1@sky.matrix...
    > Verily I say unto thee, that jim spake thusly:
    >
    >> When you give an untrained person ANYTHING, they can misuse it and
    >> harm themselves and/or others. Such is the case with automobiles,
    >> knives, guns, rocks, scissors, play dough, tiny magnets, pillows and
    >> on and on.....
    >>
    >> The problem is that some people think that end user ignorance can be
    >> coded around (i.e. UAC). That, somehow, programmers can make a
    >> system that stupid users and malicious crimminals cannot destroy.
    >> That, my friends, is a fantasy of the highest order.

    >
    > Pretty much what I've been saying for years. Computers are non-trivial
    > machines that /require/ training to use properly. It's not a popular
    > position, but it is nonetheless true.
    >
    > The likes of Gates and Jobs tried to commoditise PC's into domestic
    > appliances that could be operated by monkeys. Well they got it /half/
    > right ... PCs /are/ being operated by monkeys, but unfortunately PCs
    > are now more complex than ever (but in different ways than before).
    >
    > The solution? Train the monkeys ... at gunpoint if necessary. Or ban
    > them from ever touching computers, upon penalty of death.
    >
    > Banning Windows would also be useful, it would certainly force the
    > monkeys to learn how to do things properly, with GNU/Linux.


    The easiest road to Linux is Open Data Format legislation.

    Make it easy to move a person's data from any app and any OS to any other
    app on any other OS that chooses to support or transfer data from the old
    data format and you've got yourself a revolution.

    jim



  15. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:26:38 -0400, jim wrote:


    > Windows made computing accessible. Windows made computers popular and
    > drove the entire industry. It matters not that it was/is insecure.


    Apple made computing accessible, popular and created an industry. Glad
    to see it acknowledged that Windows is insecure.


    -Thufir

  16. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "Thufir" wrote in message
    news:QDbOi.1601$Da.557@pd7urf1no...
    > On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 23:26:38 -0400, jim wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Windows made computing accessible. Windows made computers popular and
    >> drove the entire industry. It matters not that it was/is insecure.

    >
    > Apple made computing accessible, popular and created an industry.


    LOL! Good one!

    Thanks dude.....I needed that.

    jim



  17. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2007 20:19:03 -0400, jim wrote:


    > LOL! Good one!
    >
    > Thanks dude.....I needed that.


    Apple made the first commercially succesful personal computer
    manufactured on a large scale. Are you disputing that?


    -Thufir

  18. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..


    "Thufir" wrote in message
    news:H%HOi.4223$th2.1237@pd7urf3no...
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2007 20:19:03 -0400, jim wrote:
    >
    >
    >> LOL! Good one!
    >>
    >> Thanks dude.....I needed that.

    >
    > Apple made the first commercially succesful personal computer
    > manufactured on a large scale. Are you disputing that?


    I said "Windows made computers popular and drove the entire industry."

    You responded "Apple made computing accessible, popular and created an
    industry."

    I assummed that your response indicated that you thought that Apple was the
    reason for the large PC industry we have today. If so, that is truly
    humurous (and laughably false).

    jim



  19. Re: yet another victim of Microsoft malware ..

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 09:28:38 -0400, jim wrote:


    > I said "Windows made computers popular and drove the entire industry."
    >
    > You responded "Apple made computing accessible, popular and created an
    > industry."
    >
    > I assummed that your response indicated that you thought that Apple was
    > the reason for the large PC industry we have today. If so, that is
    > truly humurous (and laughably false).


    What I actually wrote was:

    Apple made the first commercially succesful personal computer
    manufactured on a large scale.

    Certainly, neither Microsoft nor IBM were the first to successfully mass
    produced personal computers -- that was Apple.


    -Thufir

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