OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs - Linux

This is a discussion on OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs - Linux ; Guys, which tools do you primarily use for code navigation? I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work going into ebrowse ...

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Thread: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

  1. OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs


    Guys,

    which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?

    I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in
    the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work
    going into ebrowse recently.

    What do you use and why?

    Any suggestions greatly appreciated to help in navigating existing huge
    code bases using tools within emacs.

    --

  2. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron wrote:
    > which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?


    Not really Emacs solution, but...

    When I need to inspect large code and learn it, I run Doxygen on it and
    then use regular web browser (Firefox for example) to browse around.

    It's really good, for example, you see a variable or class anywhere in
    the code, just click on it, and it goes to definition, etc.

    --
    Milan Babuskov
    http://njam.sourceforge.net

  3. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron wrote:
    > Guys,
    >
    > which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?
    >
    > I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in
    > the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work
    > going into ebrowse recently.
    >
    > What do you use and why?


    Did you ever tried Cscope (http://cscope.sourceforge.net/) ?

    It's nothing compared to modern and honking development GUIs, but it
    helps me a lot when I browse a code that I don't know.

    Regards
    --
    Emmanuel Fleury | Office: 261
    Associate Professor, | Phone: +33 (0)5 40 00 69 34
    LaBRI, Domaine Universitaire | Fax: +33 (0)5 40 00 66 69
    351, Cours de la Libération | email: emmanuel.fleury@labri.fr
    33405 Talence Cedex, France | URL: http://www.labri.fr/~fleury

  4. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Emmanuel Fleury writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> Guys,
    >>
    >> which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?
    >>
    >> I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in
    >> the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work
    >> going into ebrowse recently.
    >>
    >> What do you use and why?

    >
    > Did you ever tried Cscope (http://cscope.sourceforge.net/) ?


    Yes : see above.

    I find it too slow, Much better than etags though.
    >
    > It's nothing compared to modern and honking development GUIs, but it
    > helps me a lot when I browse a code that I don't know.
    >
    > Regards


    --

  5. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Milan Babuskov writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?

    >
    > Not really Emacs solution, but...
    >
    > When I need to inspect large code and learn it, I run Doxygen on it
    > and then use regular web browser (Firefox for example) to browse
    > around.
    >
    > It's really good, for example, you see a variable or class anywhere in
    > the code, just click on it, and it goes to definition, etc.


    One could also use an external cscope browser. But I like to navigate
    while editing real code.

    --

  6. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron wrote:
    > Emmanuel Fleury writes:
    >
    >> Did you ever tried Cscope (http://cscope.sourceforge.net/) ?

    >
    > Yes : see above.


    I meant, the Cscope that is embedded in Emacs (not a Cscope browser
    aside). When you split your Emacs (Ctrl-x 1, Ctrl-x 2, Ctrl-x 3) and if
    you use Cscope, it's quite good already.

    > I find it too slow, Much better than etags though.


    I never had to complain about time performance with Cscope... Anyway.

    Regards
    --
    Emmanuel Fleury | Office: 261
    Associate Professor, | Phone: +33 (0)5 40 00 69 34
    LaBRI, Domaine Universitaire | Fax: +33 (0)5 40 00 66 69
    351, Cours de la Libération | email: emmanuel.fleury@labri.fr
    33405 Talence Cedex, France | URL: http://www.labri.fr/~fleury

  7. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron writes:

    > I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in
    > the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work
    > going into ebrowse recently.


    I tried Xrefactory:
    http://www.xref-tech.com/xrefactory/main.html
    and was impressed by it (but do not use it, as I had trouble setting
    up "automatic rebuild" of its database, IIRC).

    I do use id-utils:
    http://www.gnu.org/software/idutils/
    which answers all questions I want to ask ("where is ... referenced") "instantly".

    Cheers,
    --
    In order to understand recursion you must first understand recursion.
    Remove /-nsp/ for email.

  8. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Emmanuel Fleury writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> Emmanuel Fleury writes:
    >>
    >>> Did you ever tried Cscope (http://cscope.sourceforge.net/) ?

    >>
    >> Yes : see above.

    >
    > I meant, the Cscope that is embedded in Emacs (not a Cscope browser
    > aside). When you split your Emacs (Ctrl-x 1, Ctrl-x 2, Ctrl-x 3) and if
    > you use Cscope, it's quite good already.



    Yes. That is the one I use. Sorry, I thought it was clear from the
    context of tools in emacs for c browsing.

    >
    >> I find it too slow, Much better than etags though.

    >
    > I never had to complain about time performance with
    > Cscope... Anyway.


    Did you ever cscope the kernel source?

    >
    > Regards


    --

  9. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Paul Pluzhnikov writes:

    > Hadron writes:
    >
    >> I had used exhuberant-tags, then I played with synaptec and ecb, but in
    >> the end settled on cscope (too slow though). I see there is more work
    >> going into ebrowse recently.

    >
    > I tried Xrefactory:
    > http://www.xref-tech.com/xrefactory/main.html
    > and was impressed by it (but do not use it, as I had trouble setting
    > up "automatic rebuild" of its database, IIRC).
    >
    > I do use id-utils:
    > http://www.gnu.org/software/idutils/
    > which answers all questions I want to ask ("where is ... referenced")
    > "instantly".


    Do you use this from within any editor?
    >
    > Cheers,


    --

  10. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron writes:

    >> I do use id-utils:

    > Do you use this from within any editor?


    Yes, from emacs.
    idutils.el is part of the idutils source distribution.

    Cheers,
    --
    In order to understand recursion you must first understand recursion.
    Remove /-nsp/ for email.

  11. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Here in comp.os.linux.development.apps,
    Hadron spake unto us, saying:

    >Guys,
    >
    >which tools do you primarily use for code navigation?


    Exhuberant ctags + NEdit (mainly under Solaris, tho), with a little bit
    of cscope (via its traditional curses interface) thrown in. And grep
    when I need to find something brute force.

    --
    -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Mableton, GA USA
    Mainframe/Unix bit twiddler by day, OS/2+Linux+DOS hobbyist by night.
    WARNING: I've seen FIELDATA FORTRAN V and I know how to use it!
    The Theorem Theorem: If If, Then Then.

  12. Re: OT : the tools for C/C++ in emacs

    Hadron wrote:
    >
    > Did you ever cscope the kernel source?


    Indeed, and I dropped it... too slow... (Doh !).



    Ok, I agree with you !

    Regards
    --
    Emmanuel Fleury | Office: 261
    Associate Professor, | Phone: +33 (0)5 40 00 69 34
    LaBRI, Domaine Universitaire | Fax: +33 (0)5 40 00 66 69
    351, Cours de la Libération | email: emmanuel.fleury@labri.fr
    33405 Talence Cedex, France | URL: http://www.labri.fr/~fleury

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