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This is a discussion on Linux PDA - Linux ; Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA? Preferences: 1) Quasi-real keyboard 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc) Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000 ...

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Thread: Linux PDA

  1. Linux PDA

    Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?

    Preferences:

    1) Quasi-real keyboard
    2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc
    3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)

    Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.


  2. Re: Linux PDA

    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >
    > Preferences:
    > 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    > 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc
    > 3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >
    > Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    > is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.


    I recommend a 10" netbook.

    Advantages:
    - keyboards that actually are usable;
    - better screen;
    - better CPU;
    - more memory and storage;
    - desktop/laptop software works;
    - better battery life;
    - better price (you can buy a good one for 300€)!

    Disadvantages:
    - size.

    Regards.

  3. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >
    > Preferences:
    >
    > 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    > 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc
    > 3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >
    > Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    > is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.


    Why not go with a T-Mobile G1? Best of both worlds.

    It does have some limitations though. It doesn't record video, doesn't
    have the nifty "multi-touch" features of the iPhone, doesn't have stereo
    bluetooth, but otherwise it's not bad..

  4. Re: Linux PDA

    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >
    > Preferences:
    >
    > 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    > 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc
    > 3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >
    > Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    > is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.



    For what its worth, I've been on the same quest for a few months.
    The choices are the new Linux phones, the old PDAs and Asus EEE.

    The thing that always came out on top is Asus EEE (901 Atom/Linux 20Gb SSD)
    with Ubuntu because it has 8Hr up time, it is small enough to fit a big
    pocket, it has wireless LAN and GPRS modems could be had if greater
    distance was needed. VOIP with Twinkle get you a phone over the GPRS. It
    can also play videos and MP3 collections during long journeys. (A $10 micro
    radio transmitter for MP3 players can relay all that music to your car
    radio.) It can edit anything and everything. It can do documentation. It
    can process your photos and videos with the SD card while you are out in
    the country. The 16Gb SD cards are only 20 pound
    (<$40) and so you could carry a few of those with virtual machines to do
    deep stuff by loading up the vitual machines preloaded with software of
    choice. You can have Open Office presenation running in background to set
    up all your reminders. And when you are winding down and relaxing, that
    feature functions just like a digital photoframe!!

    The other choices just don't cut it in terms of features.

    Over to you if have better ideas!


  5. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 20:04:17 +0000, LusoTec wrote:

    > Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>
    >> Preferences:
    >> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>
    >> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >
    > I recommend a 10" netbook.
    >
    > Advantages:
    > - keyboards that actually are usable; - better screen;
    > - better CPU;
    > - more memory and storage;
    > - desktop/laptop software works;
    > - better battery life;
    > - better price (you can buy a good one for 300€)!
    >
    > Disadvantages:
    > - size.
    >
    > Regards.


    Yeah, that's probably the best bet.

  6. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 15:04:48 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >
    >> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>
    >> Preferences:
    >>
    >> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>
    >> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >
    > Why not go with a T-Mobile G1? Best of both worlds.


    Really? Somehow I just can't see entering more than a few lines of text
    on that piddly-ass little keyboard.


  7. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >
    > Preferences:
    >
    > 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    > 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    > (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >
    > Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    > is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.


    After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have to
    go with the Acer because :

    * the keyboard is nice and usable
    * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    smaller!
    * beautiful touchpad
    * 1024x600 briteview screen
    * good battery life
    * wifi
    * affordable
    * two SD card slots for extra memory

    Downside:
    Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    trying to alter it ?
    Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway




    --
    Linux full time, on the desktop, since August 1997

  8. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 15:36:34 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >
    >> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>
    >> Preferences:
    >>
    >> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>
    >> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >
    > After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have to
    > go with the Acer because :
    >
    > * the keyboard is nice and usable
    > * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    > smaller!
    > * beautiful touchpad
    > * 1024x600 briteview screen
    > * good battery life
    > * wifi
    > * affordable
    > * two SD card slots for extra memory
    >
    > Downside:
    > Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    > trying to alter it ?
    > Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway


    How's the battery and keyboard compare to the Eee? 7's review on the Eee
    suggested it might be a good consideration.


  9. Re: Linux PDA

    Terry Porter writes:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >
    >> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>
    >> Preferences:
    >>
    >> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>
    >> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    >> is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >
    > After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have to
    > go with the Acer because :
    >
    > * the keyboard is nice and usable
    > * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    > smaller!
    > * beautiful touchpad
    > * 1024x600 briteview screen
    > * good battery life
    > * wifi
    > * affordable
    > * two SD card slots for extra memory
    >
    > Downside:
    > Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    > trying to alter it ?


    Why? You mean its another hosed distro? No surprise there then.

    Distro hell rears it's ugly head once more.

    > Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway


    So why don't you boycott them? More hypocrisy? Sure seems like it.



  10. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 12:30:05 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 15:04:48 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>
    >>> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>>
    >>> Preferences:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >>> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >>> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>>
    >>> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >>> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >>
    >> Why not go with a T-Mobile G1? Best of both worlds.

    >
    > Really? Somehow I just can't see entering more than a few lines of text
    > on that piddly-ass little keyboard.


    It's larger than any other mobile keyboard i've seen. You want a PDA but
    you want a full size keyboard?

  11. Re: Linux PDA

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Erik Funkenbusch belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 12:30:05 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>>>
    >>>> Preferences:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >>>> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >>>> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>>>
    >>>> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >>>> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.
    >>>
    >>> Why not go with a T-Mobile G1? Best of both worlds.

    >>
    >> Really? Somehow I just can't see entering more than a few lines of text
    >> on that piddly-ass little keyboard.

    >
    > It's larger than any other mobile keyboard i've seen. You want a PDA but
    > you want a full size keyboard?


    Kelsey's a picky bastard . It looks pretty sweet to me. The Engadget
    review praises it in part, saying "Think of it this way: if it were running
    Windows Mobile, it'd be a footnote in HTC's history."

    I'd look more seriously into it if I weren't already tethered to Cingular
    ("Now part of the new AT&T!!!"). A $179 contract price is reasonable; the
    $399 selling price might be reasonable, but not to my mind.

    By the way, in looking at the Blackberry Bold, it's funny watching the
    iPhone boyz and the Blackberry boyz going at it about their phones.

    --
    apt: !bugs
    !bugs are stupid
    apt: are stupid? what's that?
    dpkg: i don't know
    apt: Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder...
    i already had it that way, dpkg.

  12. Re: Linux PDA

    Hadron wrote:
    > Terry Porter writes:
    >
    >> On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>
    >>> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>>
    >>> Preferences:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >>> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >>> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>>
    >>> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    >>> is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >> After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have to
    >> go with the Acer because :
    >>
    >> * the keyboard is nice and usable
    >> * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    >> smaller!
    >> * beautiful touchpad
    >> * 1024x600 briteview screen
    >> * good battery life
    >> * wifi
    >> * affordable
    >> * two SD card slots for extra memory
    >>
    >> Downside:
    >> Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    >> trying to alter it ?

    >
    > Why? You mean its another hosed distro? No surprise there then.
    >
    > Distro hell rears it's ugly head once more.
    >
    >> Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway

    >
    > So why don't you boycott them? More hypocrisy? Sure seems like it.


    More ad hominem and anti-Linux verbage, attacking the poster and
    Linux rather than address the issues being discussed.

    http://tantek.pbwiki.com/TrollTaxonomy

    Ad hominem troll

    Ad hominem troll at its simplest, will attack people personally,
    rather than the merits of their statements or methodologies.

    The ad hominem troll often has already lost a rational argument
    about a topic, and thus its goal is to change the argument from
    being about a topic, to being about the people opposed to the
    troll (which could mean any/all rational person(s) in the
    discussion), in the hopes of both discrediting people's ideas
    indirectly by discrediting the people, and engendering an
    emotional reaction from the people by attacking their egos /
    self-image. The "getting a reaction out of" goal is common to
    most troll types.

    The simple ad hominem troll is easily detected and dealt with by
    calling them on their ad hominem attacks.

    However, often ad hominem troll will start its discourse with
    seemingly reasonable commentary, perhaps an analogy etc. Using
    rational tone, they may lull you into thinking that they are
    rational in general and thus their entire message should be
    considered rational. Once they have established such an
    impression, then they will then descend into personal attacks
    which may even sound reasonably worded, until you recognize them
    for what they are, nothing more than personal attacks.

    Example: thacker. thacker starts by ignoring the previous comment
    (which itself was a rational challenge to thacker's earlier
    statements), repeating himself (see the section below on
    Repeating themselves), then moves onto an analogy. Afterwards he
    continues with personal attacks, starting subtly worded, then
    increasingly harsh:

    * "some here, yourself included, will not see nor understand
    the parallels"
    * "Your noses are simply buried too deeply into the
    proverbial bark."
    * "Or you lack the courage, will, ability to step away and
    ask the truly difficult questions. That is a shame."
    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  13. Re: Linux PDA

    On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 14:30:29 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 15:36:34 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>
    >>> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>>
    >>> Preferences:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >>> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is
    >>> user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>>
    >>> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >>> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >>
    >> After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have
    >> to go with the Acer because :
    >>
    >> * the keyboard is nice and usable
    >> * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    >> smaller!
    >> * beautiful touchpad
    >> * 1024x600 briteview screen
    >> * good battery life
    >> * wifi
    >> * affordable
    >> * two SD card slots for extra memory
    >>
    >> Downside:
    >> Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    >> trying to alter it ?
    >> Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway

    >
    > How's the battery and keyboard compare to the Eee? 7's review on the
    > Eee suggested it might be a good consideration.


    My EeePC900 has a really small keyboard, it's useless for touch typing.
    This is not a problem for me, as I don't touch type. I'm a 20WPM two
    finger typer.

    The 10" EeePC has a much better keyboard as the whole thing is a lot
    bigger than mine. Mine is almost exactly the same size as the original
    700 series EeePC, but my screen is larger wit a res of 1024x600.

    The batteries are quite different, both small, but the Acer battery is
    *** tiny ***. About the size of a medium size round texta and half as
    long again, and weighs only 6 Oz!. It's a really nice design I think.

    My EeePC is slightly smaller than the Acer, but the Acer just feels small
    and doesn't have the EeePC 'toy' look to it.

    The Acer is a beautiful unit, and Acer have done a good styling job, many
    would say above average for Acer.

    The EeePC900 is well designed, I think it's more solid than the Acer, but
    it just looks like a toy, even tho nothing could be further from the
    truth. I use it with an aftermarket 10.4AH battery, it's very large and
    heavy, compared to the standard 4AH EeePC900 battery.

    You can see in this pic :-
    http://wifi.homelinux.com/docuwiki/lib/exe/detail.php?
    id=eeepc900_external_rear_antenna_connector_mod&cache=cache&media=eeepc_and_sstenna.jpg

    I recommend that you actually check out the real world units, and play
    with the keyboards etc, before buying, if at all possible.






    --
    Linux full time, on the desktop, since August 1997

  14. Re: Linux PDA

    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 20:04:17 +0000, LusoTec wrote:
    >
    >> Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>>
    >>> Preferences:
    >>> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >>> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >>> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>>
    >>> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in
    >>> $1000 is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >>
    >> I recommend a 10" netbook.
    >>
    >> Advantages:
    >> - keyboards that actually are usable; - better screen;
    >> - better CPU;
    >> - more memory and storage;
    >> - desktop/laptop software works;
    >> - better battery life;
    >> - better price (you can buy a good one for 300€)!
    >>
    >> Disadvantages:
    >> - size.
    >>
    >> Regards.

    >
    > Yeah, that's probably the best bet.


    I'm running Ubuntu on an MSI Wind U100 and it is a close to the perfect
    travel computer that I have come across to date. In the office, I hook it
    up to a 22" screen/keyboard/mouse. It is more than powerful enough to do
    word process, spread sheets, presentations, planning (freemind), project
    planning (planner) and programming (Sun Studio 12). The inbuilt camera is
    good for conferencing and calling home to talk to the family.

    The existing wireless card didn't like some networks so I have replaced it
    with an Intel PCIe wireless card.

    I've put a bigger hard drive (320GB) more memory into it as I also use it
    for graphic processing (camera --> Gimp --> presentation). It is a little
    slow, but quite usable.

    Ian

  15. Re: Linux PDA

    Ian Hilliard wrote:

    > I'm running Ubuntu on an MSI Wind U100 and it is a close to the
    > perfect travel computer that I have come across to date. In the
    > office, I hook it up to a 22" screen/keyboard/mouse. It is more than
    > powerful enough to do word process, spread sheets, presentations,
    > planning (freemind), project planning (planner) and programming (Sun
    > Studio 12). The inbuilt camera is good for conferencing and calling
    > home to talk to the family.
    >
    > The existing wireless card didn't like some networks so I have
    > replaced it with an Intel PCIe wireless card.
    >
    > I've put a bigger hard drive (320GB) more memory into it as I also
    > use it for graphic processing (camera --> Gimp --> presentation). It
    > is a little slow, but quite usable.


    Your post is incomplete; it's missing the requisite stupid cola lie about
    Windows\Vista on the U100.




  16. Re: Linux PDA

    On Nov 9, 2:07 pm, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?


    If you really want a PDA the Sharp Zaurus was pretty good in it's
    time.

    These days, the ASUS EEE and the Acer Aspire One are probably more
    practical, and they are only about $300-$350. Since they have fully
    functional USB ports, you can also add a USB cellular modem to get
    internet access where there is no WiFi.

    > Preferences:


    > 1) Quasi-real keyboard


    The Sub-Notebooks are very close to real keyboards, but it does take a
    bit of practice to get them fully functional.

    > 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc

    Open Office on both.

    > 3) Is user-updatable (i.e. can add packages, etc)


    You can even install a different version of Linux if you like.

    > Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    > is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.


    Around $300 to $350.

    Down-side. It's a bit too big for a coat pocket, but fits nicely in a
    book bag or purse.

    Also supports Video monitors. External USB keyboards, and external
    hard drives.


  17. Re: Linux PDA

    DFS wrote:

    > Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >
    >> I'm running Ubuntu on an MSI Wind U100 and it is a close to the
    >> perfect travel computer that I have come across to date. In the
    >> office, I hook it up to a 22" screen/keyboard/mouse. It is more than
    >> powerful enough to do word process, spread sheets, presentations,
    >> planning (freemind), project planning (planner) and programming (Sun
    >> Studio 12). The inbuilt camera is good for conferencing and calling
    >> home to talk to the family.
    >>
    >> The existing wireless card didn't like some networks so I have
    >> replaced it with an Intel PCIe wireless card.
    >>
    >> I've put a bigger hard drive (320GB) more memory into it as I also
    >> use it for graphic processing (camera --> Gimp --> presentation). It
    >> is a little slow, but quite usable.

    >
    > Your post is incomplete; it's missing the requisite stupid cola lie about
    > Windows\Vista on the U100.


    How about the prerequisite warning that Windows should never be used on an
    unprotected network? Even with a virus scanner, firewall and spyware
    scanner, Windows boxes still end up getting some nasty piece of malware,
    which requires a total reinstallation.

    Windows is a poor option for a mobile companion intended for use far away
    from the protection of the corporate network.

    Ian

  18. Re: Linux PDA

    Terry Porter espoused:
    > On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 11:07:08 -0800, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >
    >> Any recommendations on a Linux-based PDA?
    >>
    >> Preferences:
    >>
    >> 1) Quasi-real keyboard
    >> 2) Can actually edit documents (OpenOffice?) etc 3) Is user-updatable
    >> (i.e. can add packages, etc)
    >>
    >> Price is less of a concern than functionality - to a point. As in $1000
    >> is getting a tad ridiculous for a PDA.

    >
    > After buying a Nokia N770, a EeePC900 and a Acer Aspire one, I'd have to
    > go with the Acer because :
    >
    > * the keyboard is nice and usable
    > * small size of the unit. you really cant make something like that much
    > smaller!
    > * beautiful touchpad
    > * 1024x600 briteview screen
    > * good battery life
    > * wifi
    > * affordable
    > * two SD card slots for extra memory
    >
    > Downside:
    > Linpus Linux may drive a Linux expert like yourself nuts, especially
    > trying to alter it ?
    > Acer cashback is like pulling fingernails, here in OZ anyway
    >
    >


    The N810 is worth a look, as it has a built-in keyboard, gnumeric works
    well on my N800 and N770, and there is a port of abiword, although I
    don't know how stable.

    If you want to play a little, you could look at this:
    http://www.maxasia.net/blog/pimp-your-n810-with-debian/

    Which shows how to install debian on an N810, and talks about
    openoffice, gedit and abiword all working. Caveat - I've not done this
    myself!

    The keyboard on the N810 is very small, though, so I don't think that
    you'd be doing any huge jobs on it. If you want something more
    substantial, then Terry's suggestion for the Acer is worth considering -
    you might also consider an N800 with bluetooth keyboard.

    --
    | mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | Open platforms prevent vendor lock-in. Own your Own services! |


  19. Re: Linux PDA

    Ian Hilliard writes:

    > DFS wrote:
    >
    >> Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm running Ubuntu on an MSI Wind U100 and it is a close to the
    >>> perfect travel computer that I have come across to date. In the
    >>> office, I hook it up to a 22" screen/keyboard/mouse. It is more than
    >>> powerful enough to do word process, spread sheets, presentations,
    >>> planning (freemind), project planning (planner) and programming (Sun
    >>> Studio 12). The inbuilt camera is good for conferencing and calling
    >>> home to talk to the family.
    >>>
    >>> The existing wireless card didn't like some networks so I have
    >>> replaced it with an Intel PCIe wireless card.
    >>>
    >>> I've put a bigger hard drive (320GB) more memory into it as I also
    >>> use it for graphic processing (camera --> Gimp --> presentation). It
    >>> is a little slow, but quite usable.

    >>
    >> Your post is incomplete; it's missing the requisite stupid cola lie about
    >> Windows\Vista on the U100.

    >
    > How about the prerequisite warning that Windows should never be used on an
    > unprotected network? Even with a virus scanner, firewall and spyware
    > scanner, Windows boxes still end up getting some nasty piece of malware,
    > which requires a total reinstallation.
    >
    > Windows is a poor option for a mobile companion intended for use far away
    > from the protection of the corporate network.
    >
    > Ian


    And yet more than 99% of laptops out there do just that.

    Strange eh?

  20. Re: Linux PDA

    Hadron wrote:

    > Ian Hilliard writes:
    >
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>
    >>> Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm running Ubuntu on an MSI Wind U100 and it is a close to the
    >>>> perfect travel computer that I have come across to date. In the
    >>>> office, I hook it up to a 22" screen/keyboard/mouse. It is more than
    >>>> powerful enough to do word process, spread sheets, presentations,
    >>>> planning (freemind), project planning (planner) and programming (Sun
    >>>> Studio 12). The inbuilt camera is good for conferencing and calling
    >>>> home to talk to the family.
    >>>>
    >>>> The existing wireless card didn't like some networks so I have
    >>>> replaced it with an Intel PCIe wireless card.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've put a bigger hard drive (320GB) more memory into it as I also
    >>>> use it for graphic processing (camera --> Gimp --> presentation). It
    >>>> is a little slow, but quite usable.
    >>>
    >>> Your post is incomplete; it's missing the requisite stupid cola lie
    >>> about Windows\Vista on the U100.

    >>
    >> How about the prerequisite warning that Windows should never be used on
    >> an unprotected network? Even with a virus scanner, firewall and spyware
    >> scanner, Windows boxes still end up getting some nasty piece of malware,
    >> which requires a total reinstallation.
    >>
    >> Windows is a poor option for a mobile companion intended for use far away
    >> from the protection of the corporate network.
    >>
    >> Ian

    >
    > And yet more than 99% of laptops out there do just that.
    >
    > Strange eh?


    Wrong. When subtracting the Mac laptops, we are already below the 90% mark.
    And strangely enough for a wintroll like Hadron Quark, lots of laptops run
    just fine with linux. Lets be generous and give wintendo laptops a 86% mark
    here.

    As usual, Hadron Quark, the "true linux advocate" and "kernel hacker" is
    vastly exaggerating windows importance. It is far less then his "more than
    99%" figure, and diminishing. When we now take the new netbooks into
    account where the linux figures are at around 30%, one can clearly see that
    this astroturfing shill is off his meds again
    --
    The Day Microsoft makes something that does not suck is probably
    the day they start making vacuum cleaners.


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