The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux - Linux

This is a discussion on The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux - Linux ; Hi All, Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :- "A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall under this category as well." What ...

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Thread: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

  1. The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    Hi All,

    Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-

    "A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    under this category as well."

    What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.

    I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    OSes.

    I did it this way because even at that time it was obvious that Windows
    didn't like to play with alternate OSes and I'm the cautious type who
    doesn't like to lose data or do things twice.

    Eventually as I grew more competent with Linux, and replaced Windows
    application with Linux ones, naturally I began to use Windows less and
    less.

    So what defining moment marked the last time I used Windows ?

    It was a new motherboard, and the date was August 1997.

    I had bought a new motherboard and cpu, ram etc, (the usual upgrade
    cycle) and fitted it in the same pc.

    Everything just continued to work fine when I powered the machine up as
    it was using the Linux hard drive and *nothing* changed for me, except
    the machine was a bit faster.

    Then, about 2 weeks later I switched over to the Windows hard disk to do
    something, (as I had been doing for the last couple of years) only to be
    greeted by "warning, new hardware detected, Windows has gone into "safe"
    mode" blah blah.

    All my 8 million Desktop icons were crunched into a tiny horrible,
    640x480, 16 color "Toys-r-Us" display.

    I thought "YOU MUST BE FRACKING JOKING, YOU GREAT BIG STEAMING
    POS !!!!!", and that was the last time I had Windows on my PC.

    The Windows hard drive was scoured for data, and then formatted with EXT2
    and a new and larger /home directory appeared on my single boot Linux PC.

    I sold my Windows 95 CD for $50 as the BSAA were having a Blitzkreig and
    business everywhere were trying to buy up legit licensed Windows CDs like
    mine.



    What was your defining moment for switching to Linux ?







    --
    Linux full time, on the desktop, since August 1997

  2. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Terry Porter belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > So what defining moment marked the last time I used Windows ?
    >
    > It was a new motherboard, and the date was August 1997.
    >
    >
    >
    > I sold my Windows 95 CD for $50 as the BSAA were having a Blitzkreig and
    > business everywhere were trying to buy up legit licensed Windows CDs like
    > mine.


    I keep all my CDs. Never know when you might need them, even the old hoary
    Win 98 (decade!) CD.

    > What was your defining moment for switching to Linux ?


    No defining moment. Just noted I hadn't booted to Windows (NT 4) in months
    (at home).

    --
    Cheit's Lament:
    If you help a friend in need, he is sure to remember you--
    the next time he's in need.

  3. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    Chris Ahlstrom espoused:
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, Terry Porter belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >> So what defining moment marked the last time I used Windows ?
    >>
    >> It was a new motherboard, and the date was August 1997.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I sold my Windows 95 CD for $50 as the BSAA were having a Blitzkreig and
    >> business everywhere were trying to buy up legit licensed Windows CDs like
    >> mine.

    >
    > I keep all my CDs. Never know when you might need them, even the old hoary
    > Win 98 (decade!) CD.
    >


    I've got a floppy-set for WFW3.11 somewhere - wonder if it's worth
    anything? :-)

    --
    | mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | Open platforms prevent vendor lock-in. Own your Own services! |


  4. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:
    >Hi All,


    >Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-


    >"A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    >software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    >under this category as well."


    >What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.


    >I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    >drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    >swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    >OSes.


    I discovered back in the late 90's that dual booting invites microsoft OSs
    to corrupt foreign partitions. My OS/2 install became far more stable when
    I quit running windows 95.

    Nowadays, if I must run a windows app, I do it in a vmware session. I don't let
    it save any work so that when it corrupts it self, I can simply revert to a
    snapshot. All my work is saved on the linux side via samba.


  5. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    AZ Nomad writes:

    > On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:
    >>Hi All,

    >
    >>Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-

    >
    >>"A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    >>software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    >>under this category as well."

    >
    >>What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.

    >
    >>I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    >>drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    >>swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    >>OSes.

    >
    > I discovered back in the late 90's that dual booting invites microsoft OSs
    > to corrupt foreign partitions. My OS/2 install became far more stable when
    > I quit running windows 95.


    That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? My company used
    dual boot for years and that never ever happened.

    >
    > Nowadays, if I must run a windows app, I do it in a vmware session. I don't let
    > it save any work so that when it corrupts it self, I can simply revert to a
    > snapshot. All my work is saved on the linux side via samba.


  6. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, AZ Nomad belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > Nowadays, if I must run a windows app, I do it in a vmware session. I don't let
    > it save any work so that when it corrupts it self, I can simply revert to a
    > snapshot. All my work is saved on the linux side via samba.


    Similar here.

    --
    You are confused; but this is your normal state.

  7. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux


    "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    news:gMDQk.62796$vX2.16748@bignews6.bellsouth.net. ..
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, AZ Nomad belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >> Nowadays, if I must run a windows app, I do it in a vmware session. I
    >> don't let
    >> it save any work so that when it corrupts it self, I can simply revert to
    >> a
    >> snapshot. All my work is saved on the linux side via samba.

    >
    > Similar here.


    VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.



  8. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    > from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    > running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.


    What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    latter now)?

    --
    "Hey! Who took the cork off my lunch??!"
    -- W. C. Fields

  9. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux


    "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    news3FQk.52714$IB6.33847@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >> VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    >> from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    >> running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.

    >
    > What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    > latter now)?


    There's lots of info on the differences out on the web an VMWares website.
    The main difference is that ESXi server is a "bare metal" hypervisor that
    has a foot print of something like 64-megs. VMWare server needs to run
    within a guest OS like Linux or Windows. ESXi comes with it's own minimal OS
    (linux based) that it uses to run the hypervisor. It doesn't need
    Linux/Windows/etc and it's faster, uses less memory and on my system can
    cold boot in just under 20 seconds. And it's FREE!

    The "local console" (on the machine where ESXi gets installed) is nicely
    done but intentionally very basic. You do all of the administration remotely
    via the management console (VIC) "Virtual Infrastructure Client" which is a
    Windows app. From there you can create VM's, take snapshots, allocate
    resources, create resource pools, start/stop the VM's, monitor everything
    and etc.



    > --
    > "Hey! Who took the cork off my lunch??!"
    > -- W. C. Fields




  10. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    On Thu, 6 Nov 2008 11:40:28 -0500, Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    >After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:


    >> VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    >> from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    >> running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.


    >What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    >latter now)?


    I think vmware server uses a hypervisor so that linux and windows get
    equal access to the cpu. vmware workstation doesn't use a hypervisor so
    what you have is a guest simulating a virtual machine running on the
    host machine. IE: my linux machine is the host, and windows runs in
    guest sessions.

  11. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    ____/ Chris Ahlstrom on Thursday 06 November 2008 12:21 : \____

    > I keep all my CDs. *Never know when you might need them, even the old hoary
    > Win 98 (decade!) CD.


    Same here. I have Warty CDs too.

    I actually have /two/ copies of Windows 98 (it was a very old laptop).

    - --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Oracle: Linux adoption to accelerate
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    run-level 5 Oct 15 15:52 last=S
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine
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  12. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    >
    > "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    > news3FQk.52714$IB6.33847@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    >> After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    >> this bit o' wisdom:
    >>
    >>> VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    >>> from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    >>> running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.

    >>
    >> What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    >> latter now)?

    >
    > There's lots of info on the differences out on the web an VMWares website.
    > The main difference is that ESXi server is a "bare metal" hypervisor that
    > has a foot print of something like 64-megs. VMWare server needs to run
    > within a guest OS like Linux or Windows. ESXi comes with it's own minimal OS
    > (linux based) that it uses to run the hypervisor. It doesn't need
    > Linux/Windows/etc and it's faster, uses less memory and on my system can
    > cold boot in just under 20 seconds. And it's FREE!
    >
    > The "local console" (on the machine where ESXi gets installed) is nicely
    > done but intentionally very basic. You do all of the administration remotely
    > via the management console (VIC) "Virtual Infrastructure Client" which is a
    > Windows app. From there you can create VM's, take snapshots, allocate
    > resources, create resource pools, start/stop the VM's, monitor everything
    > and etc.


    Thanks for the info, Zeke!

    --
    Brisk talkers are usually slow thinkers. There is, indeed, no wild beast
    more to be dreaded than a communicative man having nothing to communicate.
    If you are civil to the voluble, they will abuse your patience; if
    brusque, your character.
    -- Jonathan Swift

  13. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    On 2008-11-06, Terry Porter was urged to write the following:

    > So what defining moment marked the last time I used Windows ?
    >
    > It was a new motherboard, and the date was August 1997.
    >
    > I had bought a new motherboard and cpu, ram etc, (the usual upgrade
    > cycle) and fitted it in the same pc.
    >
    > Everything just continued to work fine when I powered the machine up as
    > it was using the Linux hard drive and *nothing* changed for me, except
    > the machine was a bit faster.


    That's a great feature of a GNU/Linux system. You can plug the drive
    in any box and have a solid chance of things continue to work right
    away. I now carry a 2GB USB stick around with Debian Lenny installed,
    and I have yet to encounter the first computer on which I cannot boot
    into a fully working X session.

    I decided to drop my Windows partition after I discovered that I
    gracefully converted to OSS software only on my Windows 2000
    installation.

    ~ Tommy
    --
    Maurice, potteke pis, potteke kak, almanak.
    ~ Urbanus

  14. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux


    "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    news:8nGQk.84959$XB4.6373@bignews9.bellsouth.net.. .
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >>
    >> "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    >> news3FQk.52714$IB6.33847@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    >>> After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    >>> this bit o' wisdom:
    >>>
    >>>> VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server
    >>>> (free)
    >>>> from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    >>>> running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.
    >>>
    >>> What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    >>> latter now)?

    >>
    >> There's lots of info on the differences out on the web an VMWares
    >> website.
    >> The main difference is that ESXi server is a "bare metal" hypervisor that
    >> has a foot print of something like 64-megs. VMWare server needs to run
    >> within a guest OS like Linux or Windows. ESXi comes with it's own minimal
    >> OS
    >> (linux based) that it uses to run the hypervisor. It doesn't need
    >> Linux/Windows/etc and it's faster, uses less memory and on my system can
    >> cold boot in just under 20 seconds. And it's FREE!
    >>
    >> The "local console" (on the machine where ESXi gets installed) is nicely
    >> done but intentionally very basic. You do all of the administration
    >> remotely
    >> via the management console (VIC) "Virtual Infrastructure Client" which is
    >> a
    >> Windows app. From there you can create VM's, take snapshots, allocate
    >> resources, create resource pools, start/stop the VM's, monitor everything
    >> and etc.

    >
    > Thanks for the info, Zeke!


    Like... it's no problem dude.

    Just a few thoughts/comments/opinions on ESXi server. VMWare made it "free"
    a few months ago. It used to cost big-bucks before this but now they give
    this away for free and hope that users will buy the add-on tools from them.

    The add-on tools are pretty awesome if you're a company. For example... hot
    backups of live/running virtual machines and you can even move a
    live/running virtual machine from one ESXi host to another while it's
    powered up without ever "missing a beat."

    But for home users you can get buy without any of this stuff and the tools
    that they give you are more than adequte. It's actually the tools (VIC)
    "Virtual Infrastructure Client" that make this product. There is soooo much
    you can do with the management console to ESXi. For example, after ESXi
    starts up you can configure what VM's will be powered on, in what order and
    how much of a delay before starting the guest VM.

    One really important thing is performance. I booted a live Linux CD (Ubuntu
    8.04 desktop) and a live Windows CD (a customzed Bart-PE I have) and tested
    performance of the OS running directly against the hardware and the
    performance of virtualizing the OS. The difference was negligible. In some
    tests the performance of running virtualized was actually *faster* than
    running natively. (Disk I/O comes to mind.)

    Beware that there are limitations. I don't know how these limitations
    compare with VM-Server (don't use it) but compared to VMWare Workstation the
    guest OS cannot access USB ports, serial/parallele ports and a guest VM can
    not mount a disk natively.

    But it's good, real good, real easy to manage/configure and it's very, very
    fast. With only a 64-Meg footprint and no underlying host-OS there isn't
    much to get in the way.




  15. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    > this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >>
    >> "Chris Ahlstrom" wrote in message
    >> news3FQk.52714$IB6.33847@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    >>> After takin' a swig o' grog, Ezekiel belched out
    >>> this bit o' wisdom:
    >>>
    >>>> VMWare workstation is awesome. Take a look sometime at ESXi server (free)
    >>>> from VMWare. I'm converting a lot of older physical machines into VM's
    >>>> running on ESXi server and it's good stuff.
    >>>
    >>> What the main difference between that and VMWare Server (I'm using the
    >>> latter now)?

    >>
    >> There's lots of info on the differences out on the web an VMWares website.
    >> The main difference is that ESXi server is a "bare metal" hypervisor that
    >> has a foot print of something like 64-megs. VMWare server needs to run
    >> within a guest OS like Linux or Windows. ESXi comes with it's own minimal OS
    >> (linux based) that it uses to run the hypervisor. It doesn't need
    >> Linux/Windows/etc and it's faster, uses less memory and on my system can
    >> cold boot in just under 20 seconds. And it's FREE!
    >>
    >> The "local console" (on the machine where ESXi gets installed) is nicely
    >> done but intentionally very basic. You do all of the administration remotely
    >> via the management console (VIC) "Virtual Infrastructure Client" which is a
    >> Windows app. From there you can create VM's, take snapshots, allocate
    >> resources, create resource pools, start/stop the VM's, monitor everything
    >> and etc.

    >
    > Thanks for the info, Zeke!
    >


    More goodness from Workstation 6.5:

    https://www.vmware.com/support/ws65/....html#majornew


    # Unity mode ??? Integrate your favorite guest applications with your
    host. Open the application window, enter Unity mode, and the Workstation
    window is automatically minimized. The guest application windows look
    just like host application windows, but with color-coded borders. You
    can
    access the virtual machine's Start menu (for Windows virtual machines)
    or Applications menu (for Linux virtual machines) by placing the
    mouse pointer over the host's Start or Applications menu, or by using
    a key combination. Note: Unity mode is supported only experimentally
    for Linux guests.

    # Accelerated 3-D graphics on Windows XP guests ???
    Workstation 6.5 virtual machines now work with applications that use
    DirectX 9 accelerated graphics with shaders up through Shader Model 2.0
    on Windows XP guests. Hosts can be running Windows 2000, Windows XP,
    Windows Vista, or Linux.


    I tested this upgrade today on a Feisty install. It feels a little less
    responsive than 6.0 under a Dapper install on the same machine, but that
    may be due to the compiz stuff that I have running on the Feisty system.

    The Unity thingy is cool. Kinda freaky having an XP DOS window floating
    on my desktop. Put the mouse on the upper left corner of the desktop
    and you get the start menu for XP.

    Now I'll have to find a Windows game to test the DirectX 9 / Shader
    Model 2.0 stuff (whatever that is). Anybody know of a cheapo 3D game
    spec'ed out that way?


  16. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, owl belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > More goodness from Workstation 6.5:
    >
    > https://www.vmware.com/support/ws65/....html#majornew
    >
    >
    > # Unity mode ??? Integrate your favorite guest applications with your
    > host. Open the application window, enter Unity mode, and the Workstation
    > window is automatically minimized. The guest application windows look
    > just like host application windows, but with color-coded borders. You
    > can access the virtual machine's Start menu (for Windows virtual machines)
    > or Applications menu (for Linux virtual machines) by placing the
    > mouse pointer over the host's Start or Applications menu, or by using
    > a key combination. Note: Unity mode is supported only experimentally
    > for Linux guests.
    >
    > # Accelerated 3-D graphics on Windows XP guests ???
    > Workstation 6.5 virtual machines now work with applications that use
    > DirectX 9 accelerated graphics with shaders up through Shader Model 2.0
    > on Windows XP guests. Hosts can be running Windows 2000, Windows XP,
    > Windows Vista, or Linux.
    >

    >
    > The Unity thingy is cool. Kinda freaky having an XP DOS window floating
    > on my desktop. Put the mouse on the upper left corner of the desktop
    > and you get the start menu for XP.


    Fsck that! I'll keep Windows in its own little sandbox, shank you very
    much!

    --
    All your people must learn before you can reach for the stars.
    -- Kirk, "The Gamesters of Triskelion", stardate 3259.2

  17. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    On Nov 6, 7:05 am, Steve Townsend wrote:
    > AZ Nomad writes:
    > > On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:
    > >>Hi All,

    >
    > >>Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-

    >
    > >>"A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    > >>software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    > >>under this category as well."

    >
    > >>What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.

    >
    > >>I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    > >>drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    > >>swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    > >>OSes.

    >
    > > I discovered back in the late 90's that dual booting invites microsoft OSs
    > > to corrupt foreign partitions. My OS/2 install became far more stable when
    > > I quit running windows 95.

    >
    > That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? My company used
    > dual boot for years and that never ever happened.


    Did your company dual boot with Win 95? Sounds like that's what he's
    talking about.

  18. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go toLinux

    On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 16:05:12 +0100, Steve Townsend wrote:

    > AZ Nomad writes:
    >
    >> On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter
    >> wrote:
    >>>Hi All,

    >>
    >>>Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-

    >>
    >>>"A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    >>>software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    >>>under this category as well."

    >>
    >>>What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.

    >>
    >>>I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    >>>drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    >>>swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    >>>OSes.

    >>
    >> I discovered back in the late 90's that dual booting invites microsoft
    >> OSs to corrupt foreign partitions. My OS/2 install became far more
    >> stable when I quit running windows 95.

    >
    > That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? My company used
    > dual boot for years and that never ever happened.
    >


    That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? In my experience
    Windows OSes are the classic data corrupter.





    --
    Linux full time, on the desktop, since August 1997

  19. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go toLinux

    On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > What was your defining moment for switching to Linux ?


    Bought a Slackware disk at Microcenter in Virginia in 1994 and thought
    that it was cool. I kept dual booting for several years. By 2002 I was
    running Linux full time in a VM both home and work. I did that
    for several years until some time in between 2006 and 2007 it dawned
    on me that I spent most of my time in Linux in the VM and only played
    games on the host. So I used Acronis TrueImage to turn the tables. I
    installed Linux as the host (SuSE for months but finally switched
    to Ubuntu in Aug 2007 me and my wife) and then put the other OS into
    the VM using the TrueImage image and now just start it if and when I
    need it which at home is rarely, very rarely. In fact, need is too
    strong, more like when I am curious to compare something.

    For a developer, all one needs is Ubuntu (or your favorite Linux)
    and a copy of Eclipse. You can do C/C++ with CDT (C++ Developer
    Tools), PHP, Ruby, and don't forget Java all with the plug-in(s) for
    your language(s) of choice.

    Oh and Id solved the games thing, no longer play Battlefield 1942, 2 or
    2142. Now I play Enemy Territory Quake Wars thank you very much Id, also
    Epic for Unreal Tournament 2004 and UT3 release is promised.

    Thanks to Terry for some great posts, like shining a welcoming light
    in this group. :-)

    --
    // This is my opinion.

  20. Re: The incident that caused me to stop dual booting and go to Linux

    Terry Porter writes:

    > On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 16:05:12 +0100, Steve Townsend wrote:
    >
    >> AZ Nomad writes:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 06 Nov 2008 02:33:56 -0600, Terry Porter
    >>> wrote:
    >>>>Hi All,
    >>>
    >>>>Roy Schestowitz recently wrote the following on COLA :-
    >>>
    >>>>"A lot of people keep dual-booting for many years until a generation of
    >>>>software 'fades' and the user conveniently goes GNU/Linux-only. I fall
    >>>>under this category as well."
    >>>
    >>>>What Roy says was certainly very true in my case.
    >>>
    >>>>I had installed Linux on my pc around 1995 - 1996 on a separate hard
    >>>>drive to my Windows 95 install, and I used to just turn off the PC and
    >>>>swap the IDE cable from one hard disk to the other, to switch between
    >>>>OSes.
    >>>
    >>> I discovered back in the late 90's that dual booting invites microsoft
    >>> OSs to corrupt foreign partitions. My OS/2 install became far more
    >>> stable when I quit running windows 95.

    >>
    >> That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? My company used
    >> dual boot for years and that never ever happened.
    >>

    >
    > That is a complete fabrication. Do you have any proof? In my experience
    > Windows OSes are the classic data corrupter.


    You have no experience. If you had you know that the claim above is a
    lie. If he had OS/2 and windows on the same partition, maybe, but
    otherwise no way.

    And, before you start showing off and talking rubbish again note that he
    DID say that they were on foreign partitions.

    If the OS can not see it then it can not corrupt it.

    I suspect it was more a case of (a) a complete lie or (b) someone like
    Chris Ahlstrom or you hosed it.


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