The awesome hardware support of Linux - Linux

This is a discussion on The awesome hardware support of Linux - Linux ; http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/10...re-device.html To be fair there's two major classes of devices that we did find that have limited support. One is the video camera webcam type things and with the latest kernel, we've done a lot of work there and there ...

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  1. The awesome hardware support of Linux

    http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/10...re-device.html

    To be fair there's two major classes of devices that we did find that
    have limited support. One is the video camera webcam type things and with
    the latest kernel, we've done a lot of work there and there is a lot more
    device support. I think the next kernel that's going to come out supports
    almost everything that we know about it, so those developers have gotten
    it together and are doing great strides. If it doesn't work, contact
    them; they'll get it to work. They're doing really good on that. After
    that there is wireless devices. About a year ago wireless wasn't doing so
    well. We got a bunch of people working on that now and everything is
    supported now. Atheros now has open source drivers. Intel--everything is
    supported; Marvell is supported. The one hold-out is Broadcom but even
    they have Linux drivers, they're just closed source. There is Linux
    support out there if you have hardware. I really don't know of any major
    device out there that we don't support.

    --
    A man's gotta know his limitations.
    -- Clint Eastwood, "Dirty Harry"

  2. Re: The awesome hardware support of Linux

    Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    > http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/10...re-device.html
    >
    > To be fair there's two major classes of devices that we did find that
    > have limited support. One is the video camera webcam type things and with
    > the latest kernel, we've done a lot of work there and there is a lot more
    > device support. I think the next kernel that's going to come out supports
    > almost everything that we know about it, so those developers have gotten
    > it together and are doing great strides. If it doesn't work, contact
    > them; they'll get it to work. They're doing really good on that. After
    > that there is wireless devices. About a year ago wireless wasn't doing so
    > well. We got a bunch of people working on that now and everything is
    > supported now. Atheros now has open source drivers. Intel--everything is
    > supported; Marvell is supported. The one hold-out is Broadcom but even
    > they have Linux drivers, they're just closed source. There is Linux
    > support out there if you have hardware. I really don't know of any major
    > device out there that we don't support.
    >


    I've seen the occasional hiccup in getting Wireless working on recent
    kernels, but you're right, the wireless support on Linux has increased
    dramatically in the last year or so.

    Compare that to sticking a CD in for each individual device on Windows
    and installing the drivers from that. At least with a Linux machine, the
    drivers come with the default kernel in most cases.

  3. Re: The awesome hardware support of Linux

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    ____/ Ben on Wednesday 05 November 2008 15:01 : \____

    > Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    >> http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/10...re-device.html
    >>
    >> To be fair there's two major classes of devices that we did find that
    >> have limited support. One is the video camera webcam type things and with
    >> the latest kernel, we've done a lot of work there and there is a lot more
    >> device support. I think the next kernel that's going to come out supports
    >> almost everything that we know about it, so those developers have gotten
    >> it together and are doing great strides. If it doesn't work, contact
    >> them; they'll get it to work. They're doing really good on that. After
    >> that there is wireless devices. About a year ago wireless wasn't doing so
    >> well. We got a bunch of people working on that now and everything is
    >> supported now. Atheros now has open source drivers. Intel--everything is
    >> supported; Marvell is supported. The one hold-out is Broadcom but even
    >> they have Linux drivers, they're just closed source. There is Linux
    >> support out there if you have hardware. I really don't know of any major
    >> device out there that we don't support.
    >>

    >
    > I've seen the occasional hiccup in getting Wireless working on recent
    > kernels, but you're right, the wireless support on Linux has increased
    > dramatically in the last year or so.
    >
    > Compare that to sticking a CD in for each individual device on Windows
    > and installing the drivers from that. At least with a Linux machine, the
    > drivers come with the default kernel in most cases.


    ....And if anything goes wrong, you don't depend on the company with 'trade
    secrets' to fix it. :-)

    Not sure what to buy for Wireless? Buy Atheros

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Atheros has now stepped up to the plate and delivered a home run on
    | Open-Licensed support for their wireless drivers, and not just any any
    | wireless drivers. The code for their latest 802.11n cards is already online :
    | http://wireless.kernel.org/en/users/Drivers/ath9k
    |
    | According to Mad Wifi, Atheros has hired Luis Rodriguez and Jouni Malinen,
    | who are going to continue to work on the driver. That means this release
    | isn't a simple code dump to look good on paper. Nor is the release
    | semi-opened up, it's under the ISC License, which is what the radically
    | open-licensed OpenBSD developers are using.
    `----

    http://zerias.blogspot.com/2008/07/n...eless-buy.html

    - --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Othello for Win32/Linux: http://othellomaster.com
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    16:05:01 up 21 days, 23 min, 1 user, load average: 4.10, 4.13, 4.05
    http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project
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  4. Re: The awesome hardware support of Linux

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Roy Schestowitz belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > Not sure what to buy for Wireless? Buy Atheros
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    >| Atheros has now stepped up to the plate and delivered a home run on
    >| Open-Licensed support for their wireless drivers, and not just any any
    >| wireless drivers. The code for their latest 802.11n cards is already online :
    >| http://wireless.kernel.org/en/users/Drivers/ath9k
    >|
    >| According to Mad Wifi, Atheros has hired Luis Rodriguez and Jouni Malinen,
    >| who are going to continue to work on the driver. That means this release
    >| isn't a simple code dump to look good on paper. Nor is the release
    >| semi-opened up, it's under the ISC License, which is what the radically
    >| open-licensed OpenBSD developers are using.
    > `----
    >
    > http://zerias.blogspot.com/2008/07/n...eless-buy.html


    When I bought an el cheapo Ativa wireless from Office Depot, I had to google
    the FCC ID on the thing to find out it was atheros-based. Works great!

    --
    The San Diego Freeway. Official Parking Lot of the 1984 Olympics!

  5. Re: The awesome hardware support of Linux

    Verily I say unto thee, that Roy Schestowitz spake thusly:
    > ____/ Ben on Wednesday 05 November 2008 15:01 : \____


    >> Compare that to sticking a CD in for each individual device on
    >> Windows and installing the drivers from that. At least with a Linux
    >> machine, the drivers come with the default kernel in most cases.

    >
    > ...And if anything goes wrong, you don't depend on the company with
    > 'trade secrets' to fix it. :-)


    A guy I know recently asked me the ominous and leading question: "Do you
    know anything about computers?" Naturally he was having problems, in his
    case his laptop was going BSOD every time he activated the WiFi. When he
    asked me what was wrong, I just told him there was no way to know - it's
    Windows. I could have given him the scripted reply about drivers, but is
    it fair to lead people on wild goose chases based on hunches? And that's
    the thing about proprietary software (especially when it's substandard),
    if it doesn't work then there's absolutely nothing you can do, and it's
    likely no one else can either, outside of the vendors who sold you that
    software. If the vendor is unwilling or unable to help, then you have no
    further recourse, except possibly expensive civil litigation.

    Fortunately for him, his laptop is still under warranty with PC World,
    but all their monkeys will do is ... Wipe'N'Reinstall as usual. They
    won't actually /fix/ the problem, so the same set of circumstances that
    caused the problem to begin with, will likely manifest again some time
    in the near future. And round and round it goes.

    What a mess ... and for what? So a bunch of paranoid megalomaniacs can
    hoard "Intellectual Property" (i.e. "knowledge") and sell it, rather
    than sell services based on Free Software.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "At the time, I thought C was the most elegant language and Java
    | the most practical one. That point of view lasted for maybe two
    | weeks after initial exposure to Lisp." ~ Constantine Vetoshev
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.25.11-60.fc8
    23:40:10 up 7:23, 3 users, load average: 0.04, 0.19, 0.17

  6. Re: The awesome hardware support of Linux

    Homer wrote:

    > Fortunately for him, his laptop is still under warranty with PC World,
    > but all their monkeys will do is ... Wipe'N'Reinstall as usual. They
    > won't actually /fix/ the problem, so the same set of circumstances that
    > caused the problem to begin with, will likely manifest again some time
    > in the near future. And round and round it goes.


    The "wipe'n'reinstall" policy a lot of vendors seem to have really does
    need to change. I don't pay for a computer, with warranty and insurance,
    for it to have all of its data wiped whenever something goes wrong.
    That's not repairing it at all, and the people who the companies employ
    to do it really aren't computer specialists, they're just salespeople.
    If you want the job done properly, get a real technician who understands
    the issues, or to rephrase that, someone who *can* understand the
    issues. As you said, it's hard if not impossible to do that on most
    proprietary software without someone reverse engineering it (which is of
    questionable legality, anyway).

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