15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them) - Linux

This is a discussion on 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them) - Linux ; http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline, freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos....

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Thread: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

  1. 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html

    Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline,
    freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.



  2. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn'tone of them)

    On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    > http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >
    > Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline,
    > freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.


    Memristor: OS independant.
    Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    USB 3.0: OS independant.
    Wireless power: OS independant.
    64-bit computing: OS independant.
    Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?
    Google OS: Not Windows.
    Gesture-based RC: OS independant.
    Tru2way: Nothing do do with Windows.
    The end of DRM: proprietary issue anyway.
    Mobile phones stuff: Nothing to do with Windows.
    Multitouch: Not Windows specific.
    Paperless office: Nothing to do with Windows.
    LBS: Nothing to do with Windows.

    --
    tommy@mordor:~$ telnet mordor
    telnet: could not resolve mordor/telnet: One does not simply telnet
    into mordor!

  3. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn'tone of them)

    DFS wrote:
    > http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >
    > Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline,
    > freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.
    >
    >


    Note that the article's title says *new* technologies.

    Linux isn't new. It's still under constant development, but it's far
    from new. So I don't see the relevance.

    Oh wait, you took the word "new" out of your thread title. Heh... Makes
    sense...

  4. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    On Tue, 04 Nov 2008 11:38:47 +0000, TomB wrote:

    > On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >> http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>
    >> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline,
    >> freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.


    Talking of freeze-o-matic, here's Vista crapware:

    Vista random freezes:
    http://forums.microsoft.com/TechNet/...2596&SiteID=17


    Windows vista freezes crashes becomes unresponsive:
    http://www.technologyquestions.com/t...esponsive.html


    Vista freezes:
    http://www.vistaheads.com/forums/mic...a-freezes.html

    Vista freezes oftern:
    http://www.vistaheads.com/forums/mic...zes-often.html

    Vista freezes for about 10 minutes
    http://www.vistaheads.com/forums/mic...0-minutes.html

    Vista freezes after 40 minutes of use!
    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/...tes-what-wrong

    As for M$ crapware:-
    Darren Brown, data centre lead at consulting firm Avanade
    "Within the Microsoft environment, we have struggled for years with
    applications that are written so poorly that they will not work with
    others. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7540282.stm


    > Memristor: OS independant.
    > Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    > Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    > USB 3.0: OS independant.
    > Wireless power: OS independant.
    > 64-bit computing: OS independant.
    > Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?
    > Google OS: Not Windows.
    > Gesture-based RC: OS independant.
    > Tru2way: Nothing do do with Windows.
    > The end of DRM: proprietary issue anyway.
    > Mobile phones stuff: Nothing to do with Windows.
    > Multitouch: Not Windows specific.
    > Paperless office: Nothing to do with Windows.
    > LBS: Nothing to do with Windows.


    --
    Most people are sheep. *
    Microsoft is very effective
    at fleecing the flockers.



  5. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    TomB wrote:

    > On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >>

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>
    >> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the flatline,
    >> freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.


    > Memristor: OS independant.
    > Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    > Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    > USB 3.0: OS independant.
    > Wireless power: OS independant.
    > 64-bit computing: OS independant.


    Interesting that this point is all about Windows, including the fact that
    Microsoft was (of course) the last to implement a 64-bit version,
    and "still won't commit to an all-64-bit Windows".
    No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications. I wonder howcome ...

    > Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?


    One word: Vapourware. Chances are that it will be about as hot as Vista and
    as new as Windows Me III. In other words: the same old crap, painted over
    once more, perhaps with a few appendages lopped off to make it lose weight
    in comparison to Vista.

    > Google OS: Not Windows0.
    > Gesture-based RC: OS independant.
    > Tru2way: Nothing do do with Windows.
    > The end of DRM: proprietary issue anyway.
    > Mobile phones stuff: Nothing to do with Windows.
    > Multitouch: Not Windows specific.
    > Paperless office: Nothing to do with Windows.


    Hahahaha! Not that old chestnut again! Man, whoever wrote this, should do a
    bit of research first next time. The "paperless office" was already
    predicted as early as 1975; and it's been "just around the corner"
    countless times between about 1980 and 2000, when the industry appears to
    have given up on it in the light of the fact that paper use in the office
    actually more than doubled during that period.

    > LBS: Nothing to do with Windows.


    If history shows us one thing, it's that predictions like these are useless.
    Lots of new technologies dezerving the qualifications "hot, new & changing
    things" weren't predicted at all, like text messaging, netbooks, and
    YouTube, to name just a few.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

  6. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    Richard Rasker wrote:
    > TomB wrote:
    >
    >> On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >>>

    > http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>>
    >>> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the
    >>> flatline, freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.

    >
    >> Memristor: OS independant.
    >> Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    >> Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    >> USB 3.0: OS independant.
    >> Wireless power: OS independant.
    >> 64-bit computing: OS independant.

    >
    > Interesting that this point is all about Windows, including the fact
    > that Microsoft was (of course) the last to implement a 64-bit version,
    > and "still won't commit to an all-64-bit Windows".
    > No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    > delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications.


    That's the lie you wacks tell yourselves. The reality is a 64-bit Windows
    NT was available in 1993.



    >> Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?

    >
    > One word: Vapourware.


    Just like you don't know what price gouging is, you also have no idea what
    vaporware means.


    > Chances are that it will be about as hot as
    > Vista and as new as Windows Me III. In other words: the same old
    > crap, painted over once more, perhaps with a few appendages lopped
    > off to make it lose weight in comparison to Vista.


    No matter what, it will be miles and miles ahead of Linux crapware.




  7. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    On 2008-11-04, DFS wrote:
    > Richard Rasker wrote:
    >> TomB wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >>>>

    >> http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the
    >>>> flatline, freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.

    >>
    >>> Memristor: OS independant.
    >>> Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    >>> Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    >>> USB 3.0: OS independant.
    >>> Wireless power: OS independant.
    >>> 64-bit computing: OS independant.

    >>
    >> Interesting that this point is all about Windows, including the fact
    >> that Microsoft was (of course) the last to implement a 64-bit version,
    >> and "still won't commit to an all-64-bit Windows".
    >> No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    >> delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications.

    >
    > That's the lie you wacks tell yourselves. The reality is a 64-bit Windows
    > NT was available in 1993.


    ...a sort of red-headed stepchild sort of 64-bit windows.

    It's a lot like crowing about the 2.51 verson of Solaris x86.

    >
    >
    >
    >>> Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?

    >>
    >> One word: Vapourware.

    >
    > Just like you don't know what price gouging is, you also have no idea what
    > vaporware means.


    It's not really meaningful until a consumer can use it without turning
    themselves into a digital mennonite. Now I as a Linux user can recompile
    just about anything I need. The average NT user isn't as fortunate.

    [deletia]


    --
    Apple: because TRANS.TBL is an mp3 file. It really is! |||
    / | \

    Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    http://www.usenet.com

  8. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn'tone of them)

    Richard Rasker wrote:

    >> Paperless office: Nothing to do with Windows.

    >
    > Hahahaha! Not that old chestnut again! Man, whoever wrote this, should do a
    > bit of research first next time. The "paperless office" was already
    > predicted as early as 1975; and it's been "just around the corner"
    > countless times between about 1980 and 2000, when the industry appears to
    > have given up on it in the light of the fact that paper use in the office
    > actually more than doubled during that period.


    IME, that's down to lazy arseholes printing off emails because it's too
    much effort to read it off a screen.

    Remove their printers, problem solved.

  9. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    DFS wrote:

    > Richard Rasker wrote:
    >> TomB wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >>>>

    >>

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the
    >>>> flatline, freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.

    >>
    >>> Memristor: OS independant.
    >>> Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    >>> Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    >>> USB 3.0: OS independant.
    >>> Wireless power: OS independant.
    >>> 64-bit computing: OS independant.

    >>
    >> Interesting that this point is all about Windows, including the fact
    >> that Microsoft was (of course) the last to implement a 64-bit version,
    >> and "still won't commit to an all-64-bit Windows".
    >> No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    >> delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications.

    >
    > That's the lie you wacks tell yourselves. The reality is a 64-bit Windows
    > NT was available in 1993.
    >


    Bull****. It ran in 32bit-mode on that 64bit processor
    You wintendo fanbois strangely can't get even those simple facts correctly.
    And the fact that the Alpha processor was 64bit does not mean that windows
    made any use of it. It didn't

    >
    >>> Windows 7: Hey, Windows. 7. Will it change the world?

    >>
    >> One word: Vapourware.

    >
    > Just like you don't know what price gouging is, you also have no idea what
    > vaporware means.


    It means MS "announcements" of teh all new hyper duper super app

    >
    >> Chances are that it will be about as hot as
    >> Vista and as new as Windows Me III. In other words: the same old
    >> crap, painted over once more, perhaps with a few appendages lopped
    >> off to make it lose weight in comparison to Vista.

    >
    > No matter what, it will be miles and miles ahead of Linux crapware.


    Certainly. After all, your world is flat, too
    --
    Microsoft software doesn't get released - it escapes, leaving
    a trail of destruction behind it.


  10. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    DFS wrote:

    > Richard Rasker wrote:
    >> TomB wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-11-04, DFS was urged to write the following:
    >>>>

    >>

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/15268...verything.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Good bit of talk about Windows, but the only mention of the
    >>>> flatline, freeze-o-matic Linux crapware is a link to thinkgos.

    >>
    >>> Memristor: OS independant.
    >>> Multi-core CPUs: OS independant.
    >>> Nehalem/Swift chips: OS independant.
    >>> USB 3.0: OS independant.
    >>> Wireless power: OS independant.
    >>> 64-bit computing: OS independant.

    >>
    >> Interesting that this point is all about Windows, including the fact
    >> that Microsoft was (of course) the last to implement a 64-bit version,
    >> and "still won't commit to an all-64-bit Windows".
    >> No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    >> delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications.

    >
    > That's the lie you wacks tell yourselves. The reality is a 64-bit Windows
    > NT was available in 1993.


    Please get your facts straight before making a fool of yourself. Yes,
    Windows NT could run on some 64-bit CPU's -- but the code was plain 32-bit,
    not 64-bit. So NT was by no means a 64-bit OS.


    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

  11. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Peter Köhlmann belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > DFS wrote:
    >
    >>> No mention whatsoever is made that Linux was years ahead of Windows in
    >>> delivering both a 64-bit OS and 64-bit applications.

    >>
    >> That's the lie you wacks tell yourselves. The reality is a 64-bit Windows
    >> NT was available in 1993.

    >
    > Bull****. It ran in 32bit-mode on that 64bit processor
    > You wintendo fanbois strangely can't get even those simple facts correctly.
    > And the fact that the Alpha processor was 64bit does not mean that windows
    > made any use of it. It didn't


    DFS keeps repeating that lie. What a liar.

    >> No matter what, it will be miles and miles ahead of Linux crapware.

    >
    > Certainly. After all, your world is flat, too


    So's his head.

    --
    Save energy: be apathetic.

  12. Re: 15 Technologies That Will Change Everything (hint: Linux isn't one of them)

    Richard Rasker wrote:

    > Please get your facts straight before making a fool of yourself. Yes,
    > Windows NT could run on some 64-bit CPU's -- but the code was plain
    > 32-bit, not 64-bit. So NT was by no means a 64-bit OS.


    You're right.





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