[News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks - Linux ; -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 The netbook newbie's guide to Linux ,----[ Quote ] | This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind | ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. The ...

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Thread: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

  1. [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

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    The netbook newbie's guide to Linux

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind
    | ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. The personal computer
    | is a machine you work on. Netbooks are essentially machines you work through,
    | out into the Cloud.
    `----

    http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/10...linux_guide_2/

    Linux Journal Live! - Netbook Showdown

    http://www.linuxjournal.com/video/li...tbook-showdown

    How to sell Linux netbooks to the world

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | By contrast, Windows comes at a price - and what's more, we're only talking
    | Windows XP here. A cheap netbook with its pithy disk space and RAM will choke
    | on Vista with its far heavier hardware requirements.
    |
    | This is the advertising campaign for the next breed of Linux netbooks: a
    | compact web browser in the palm of your hand. Nothing more need be said.
    | That's the expectation to set, and one that will meet the needs of much of
    | the modern world.
    `----

    http://www.itwire.com/content/view/21392/1143/1/2/


    Recent:

    Linux Carried Along on Netbooks Wave

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Morvay revealed to Linux Magazine Online that there were no specific figures
    | for Linux netbook sales, but that it lay somewhere in the 40th percentile.
    | Even though this figure seems a little high, it is known that many of the
    | world's netbooks have Linux on board since their first inception 18 months
    | ago.
    |
    | For example, notebooks with Linux make up about 5.5% of the notebook market
    | in Germany...
    `----

    http://www.linuxpromagazine.com/onli..._netbooks_wave
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  2. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    Roy Schestowitz wrote:

    > The netbook newbie's guide to Linux
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    > | This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind
    > | ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. The personal
    > | computer is a machine you work on. Netbooks are essentially machines you
    > | work through, out into the Cloud.
    > `----
    >
    > http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/10...linux_guide_2/
    >


    This is not actually true.

    I've just come back from another business trip, where all that I had was an
    MSI Wind U100 with Ubuntu 8.04 loaded.

    Apart from the things like e-mail, telephoning, etc.. the machine spent a
    lot of time hooked up to projectors in meetings. Here programs like
    freemind and planner came to the fore. I also produced a number of
    presentations which were as smooth as silk on the little machine.

    The four to five hours of battery life and the small size make the Wind
    perfect for working on planes and in airports. The light weight makes it
    great for carrying.

    After just about every meeting I had people coming up and asking about the
    great little laptop. They realized that the desktop was a little different,
    but when they saw the familiar Windows application running, they were
    convinced that it was Windows after all. When asked, I would explain that
    Linux kept the machine secure and Crossover Office let me run the Windows
    applications that they had seen.

    The only weakness with this little laptop is the screen resolution. A 12"
    screen with 1280x800 would make it just about perfect. This would preclude
    the use of Windows XP, but the use of Crossover office should fill the gap.
    I think that these mini-laptops running Linux are destined to be a popular
    business traveller's accessory.

    Ian

  3. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    Ian Hilliard wrote:

    > I've just come back from another business trip, where all that I had
    > was an MSI Wind U100 with Ubuntu 8.04 loaded.


    I bet it's never randomly locked up or frozen on you...


    > Apart from the things like e-mail, telephoning, etc.. the machine
    > spent a lot of time hooked up to projectors in meetings. Here
    > programs like freemind and planner came to the fore. I also produced
    > a number of presentations which were as smooth as silk on the little
    > machine.


    Gnome planner vs MS Project... hmmm...let me think.


    > After just about every meeting I had people coming up and asking
    > about the great little laptop. They realized that the desktop was a
    > little different, but when they saw the familiar Windows application
    > running, they were convinced that it was Windows after all.


    You should have shown them a terminal and some arcane commands and explained
    this is what's in store for them if they purchase a Linux version of a
    'netbook'.


    >When
    > asked, I would explain that Linux kept the machine secure and
    > Crossover Office let me run the Windows applications that they had
    > seen.


    The top selling point for Linux crapware: you might be able to run some
    Windows apps.



    > The only weakness with this little laptop is the screen resolution. A
    > 12" screen with 1280x800 would make it just about perfect. This would
    > preclude the use of Windows XP,


    huh?


    > but the use of Crossover office
    > should fill the gap. I think that these mini-laptops running Linux
    > are destined to be a popular business traveller's accessory.


    Not if they're available with Windows.




  4. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    DFS wrote:

    > Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >
    >> I've just come back from another business trip, where all that I had
    >> was an MSI Wind U100 with Ubuntu 8.04 loaded.

    >
    > I bet it's never randomly locked up or frozen on you...


    No never!!!

    It is as stable as a rock and that despite connecting up to numerous
    different networks, some with direct exposure to the Internet (i.e.
    unfiltered public IP).

    >
    >
    >> Apart from the things like e-mail, telephoning, etc.. the machine
    >> spent a lot of time hooked up to projectors in meetings. Here
    >> programs like freemind and planner came to the fore. I also produced
    >> a number of presentations which were as smooth as silk on the little
    >> machine.

    >
    > Gnome planner vs MS Project... hmmm...let me think.


    Gnome planner is more than enough to work out a project plan and costs a LOT
    less, i.e. nothing. The resulting project plan can then be exported as HTML
    so that it can be put onto a corporate Intranet.

    >
    >
    >> After just about every meeting I had people coming up and asking
    >> about the great little laptop. They realized that the desktop was a
    >> little different, but when they saw the familiar Windows application
    >> running, they were convinced that it was Windows after all.

    >
    > You should have shown them a terminal and some arcane commands and
    > explained this is what's in store for them if they purchase a Linux
    > version of a 'netbook'.


    Why would they want a terminal any more than Windows? But, I guess that you
    also don't really understand Windows and as such never use the command line
    applications. As such, you are strongly limiting yourself.


    >
    >
    >>When
    >> asked, I would explain that Linux kept the machine secure and
    >> Crossover Office let me run the Windows applications that they had
    >> seen.

    >
    > The top selling point for Linux crapware: you might be able to run some
    > Windows apps.


    The top selling point for Linux is that it is secure. There is no need for a
    corporate network to protect it. There is a lot of free software that comes
    with Linux and if necessary those Windows applications that you need can
    also run.

    >
    >
    >
    >> The only weakness with this little laptop is the screen resolution. A
    >> 12" screen with 1280x800 would make it just about perfect. This would
    >> preclude the use of Windows XP,

    >
    > huh?
    >


    It looks like you failed that piece of your Troll Training course. It is not
    permitted to put XP onto a computer with a screen larger than 10.2" and it
    is not permitted to be a touch screen. The alternative is that you install
    XP as an upgrade on Vista Pro. The resultant cost increase would make a
    netbook inviable.

    >
    >> but the use of Crossover office
    >> should fill the gap. I think that these mini-laptops running Linux
    >> are destined to be a popular business traveller's accessory.

    >
    > Not if they're available with Windows.


    Windows was designed to form an incestual unit within a corporate network.
    The security is to be provided by firewalls and routers on the edge of the
    network. It is very dangerous to permit Windows boxes to roam the world
    using unprotected networks and then permit these boxes back inside the
    network. It happens all the time and it is the most common cause of
    infections within corporate networks. It is for this reason that a number
    of companies are giving their mobile staff Macbooks. The use of a Linux
    netbooks would be a much cheaper alternative.

    Ian

  5. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Ian Hilliard belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > DFS wrote:
    >
    >> Gnome planner vs MS Project... hmmm...let me think.

    >
    > Gnome planner is more than enough to work out a project plan and costs a LOT
    > less, i.e. nothing. The resulting project plan can then be exported as HTML
    > so that it can be put onto a corporate Intranet.


    I hope it has a better user interface than Microsoft Project. That one's
    even more stilted and klunky than Visio.

    I really prefer TaskJuggler's approach, though that project seems to be
    taking a fork in the road.

    --
    Forty two.

  6. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 14:11:11 +0900, Ian Hilliard wrote:

    > Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >> The netbook newbie's guide to Linux
    >>
    >> ,----[ Quote ]
    >> | This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to
    >> remind | ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. The
    >> personal | computer is a machine you work on. Netbooks are essentially
    >> machines you | work through, out into the Cloud.
    >> `----
    >>
    >> http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/10...linux_guide_2/
    >>
    >>

    > This is not actually true.
    >
    > I've just come back from another business trip, where all that I had was
    > an MSI Wind U100 with Ubuntu 8.04 loaded.
    >
    > Apart from the things like e-mail, telephoning, etc.. the machine spent
    > a lot of time hooked up to projectors in meetings. Here programs like
    > freemind and planner came to the fore. I also produced a number of
    > presentations which were as smooth as silk on the little machine.
    >
    > The four to five hours of battery life and the small size make the Wind
    > perfect for working on planes and in airports. The light weight makes it
    > great for carrying.
    >
    > After just about every meeting I had people coming up and asking about
    > the great little laptop. They realized that the desktop was a little
    > different, but when they saw the familiar Windows application running,
    > they were convinced that it was Windows after all. When asked, I would
    > explain that Linux kept the machine secure and Crossover Office let me
    > run the Windows applications that they had seen.
    >
    > The only weakness with this little laptop is the screen resolution. A
    > 12" screen with 1280x800 would make it just about perfect. This would
    > preclude the use of Windows XP, but the use of Crossover office should
    > fill the gap. I think that these mini-laptops running Linux are destined
    > to be a popular business traveller's accessory.
    >
    > Ian


    Great post Ian!

    I totally agree with you.

    I use my Linux EeePC900 (similar to the Acer Aspire One) for all kind of
    things.

    My unit is the subject of my article:
    http://wifi.homelinux.com/docuwiki/doku.php?
    id=eeepc900_external_rear_antenna_connector_mod

    Just last night I used it to give my X10 presentation at my local Linux
    User Group:-
    http://wifi.homelinux.com/docuwiki/d...ome_automation

    I used it connected to a LCD projector, where it used the full res of the
    projector automatically, and also displayed Firefox on its small 1024x600
    screen.

    I controlled the presentation with a Genius USB remote laser hand
    controller, moving up and down threu the pages of mt presentation while
    sitting back in the audience.

    After the presentation, I connected the X10 gear to the EeePC and
    remotely controlled some lamps at the LUG.

    The whole meeting went for about 4 hrs and my Eeepc was on the whole
    time, running only from its battery. I don't even bother taking the Eeepc
    mains power pack anywhere these days.

    As usual, the older laptop owners were looking for their powerpacks after
    a couple of hours.

    Oh, one more thing. My EeeePC900 was also running Kismet with flite the
    whole time, and every time someone in the meeting connected to the local
    Wlan during my presentation, my Eeepc would speak the ESSID and other
    details of the new wifi client out loudly!

    Cheers
    Terry


    --
    Linux full time, on the desktop, since August 1997

  7. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    Verily I say unto thee, that Ian Hilliard spake thusly:

    > Windows was designed to form an incestual unit within a corporate
    > network.


    Actually that was NT. Vanilla Windows had even less security (in fact,
    none at all). The hybrids from 2K onwards seem to have inherited all of
    the weaknesses of Vanilla Windows (e.g. gaping holes like ActiveX), with
    some band-aid security plastered on top (e.g. SFC, UAC, etc.). In *all*
    cases, Windows networking is a joke (e.g. Vista: 1500 packets just to
    delete a file), and the back office garbage they connect to is just as
    bad, if not worse (e.g. Exchange).

    AFAICT the only reason corporates continue to embrace Windows solutions,
    is because of buzzword-junky; clueless; pointy-hairs who think "Lenux"
    is for terrorists.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "At the time, I thought C was the most elegant language and Java
    | the most practical one. That point of view lasted for maybe two
    | weeks after initial exposure to Lisp." ~ Constantine Vetoshev
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.25.11-60.fc8
    21:10:35 up 21 days, 7:06, 3 users, load average: 0.19, 0.12, 0.13

  8. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

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    ____/ Homer on Friday 31 October 2008 21:10 : \____

    > Verily I say unto thee, that Ian Hilliard spake thusly:
    >
    >> Windows was designed to form an incestual unit within a corporate
    >> network.

    >
    > Actually that was NT. Vanilla Windows had even less security (in fact,
    > none at all). The hybrids from 2K onwards seem to have inherited all of
    > the weaknesses of Vanilla Windows (e.g. gaping holes like ActiveX), with
    > some band-aid security plastered on top (e.g. SFC, UAC, etc.). In *all*
    > cases, Windows networking is a joke (e.g. Vista: 1500 packets just to
    > delete a file), and the back office garbage they connect to is just as
    > bad, if not worse (e.g. Exchange).
    >
    > AFAICT the only reason corporates continue to embrace Windows solutions,
    > is because of buzzword-junky; clueless; pointy-hairs who think "Lenux"
    > is for terrorists.


    Someone (or someones) is preaching it to them. There are meetings and
    conferences occurring annually. People's hallway chit-chat is no formal
    presentation, so you want see this in the Wintel press.

    Spotted 3 hours ago:


    Blacklisted by Microsoft!

    "I guess it was inevitable. After taking Microsoft to task for its many Vista
    foibles, and after very publicly excoriating the company over its mistreatment
    of enterprise desktop customers, the Redmond empire finally struck back.

    "Basically, they blacklisted me from certain super-secret (i.e. pre-conference,
    NDA, off-the books) sessions at their Professional Developer Conference
    (PDC) –- this after formally inviting me to attend those sessions as
    an "esteemed reviewer" representing InfoWorld."

    [...]

    "Oct. 9, 2008 -- A short while later, I get my first hit. It seems that the
    whole mess started when the Windows Server team made the mistake of inviting
    yours truly to an event hosted by the Windows Client team. Apparently, the
    folks on the Server team were unaware of my decidedly negative views towards
    Vista, and when the Client folks found out they had invited Randall C.
    Kennedy -– a.k.a. Vista's most vocal and effective critic -– to their
    special, "for fanbois only" (nice photos, Paul) shindig, they went ballistic.

    "First, it appears that someone high up on the Client Team (Steve?) really
    doesn't like me. I mean, really, truly loathes me. And it's not just your
    run-of-the-mill frustration with a journalist who picks on them. This thing is
    personal, and the executive in question is allowing his or her personal
    feelings to spill over into the company's handling of formal press relations
    with InfoWorld.

    "But it doesn't stop there. The "official" explanation for my blacklisting and
    subsequent "dis-invitation" is that I somehow "violated the non-disclosure
    agreement" for Windows Vista Service Pack 1 Beta by publishing benchmark
    results before the update was released."

    http://weblog.infoworld.com/enterpri...listed_by.html



    - --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Reversi for free: http://othellomaster.com
    http://Schestowitz.com | Open Prospects | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Tasks: 140 total, 1 running, 139 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie
    http://iuron.com - knowledge engine, not a search engine
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  9. Re: [News] New Guide to GNU/Linux Sub-notebooks

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Roy Schestowitz belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    > Blacklisted by Microsoft!
    >
    > [...]


    Oct. 8, 2008 -- I receive a mysterious "recall" notice in my Outlook
    Inbox from this same Julie McCormick. Apparently, she's trying to
    "unsend" the aforementioned invitation e-mail. Fortunately, I don't use
    Exchange Server (makes it harder for my sources to recant when they get
    cold feet), so this rather clumsy attempt at "evidence elimination"
    fails miserably. However, I'm concerned that such attempt was made in the
    first place. Why try to "undo" my invitation e-mail? Was I now being
    uninvited to the super-secret workshop?

    Panicking, I quickly hit reply to inquire as to the status of my
    invitation. At this point I'm thinking it must be a mistake, but since
    I've already booked my plane ticket (and can't change it without
    incurring all sorts of nasty penalties), I want to be sure.
    McCormick replies that she had "overstepped her boundaries" by inviting
    me and that the event in question was now at capacity.

    > "Oct. 9, 2008 -- A short while later, I get my first hit. It seems that the
    > whole mess started when the Windows Server team made the mistake of inviting
    > yours truly to an event hosted by the Windows Client team. Apparently, the
    > folks on the Server team were unaware of my decidedly negative views towards
    > Vista, and when the Client folks found out they had invited Randall C.
    > Kennedy -? a.k.a. Vista's most vocal and effective critic -? to their
    > special, "for fanbois only" (nice photos, Paul) shindig, they went ballistic.
    >
    > "First, it appears that someone high up on the Client Team (Steve?) really
    > doesn't like me. I mean, really, truly loathes me. And it's not just your
    > run-of-the-mill frustration with a journalist who picks on them. This thing is
    > personal, and the executive in question is allowing his or her personal
    > feelings to spill over into the company's handling of formal press relations
    > with InfoWorld.
    >
    > "But it doesn't stop there. The "official" explanation for my blacklisting and
    > subsequent "dis-invitation" is that I somehow "violated the non-disclosure
    > agreement" for Windows Vista Service Pack 1 Beta by publishing benchmark
    > results before the update was released."
    >
    > http://weblog.infoworld.com/enterpri...listed_by.html


    Whining business-ass-kissing fanboi comment:

    George 10/27/2008 08:09:06 PM

    That was probably one of the most immature articles I have
    ever read. I felt like I was reading my sister's diary after
    she got dumped by her boyfriend. Maybe if you showed some
    professionalism, big business might let you tag along.

    "Tag along". Heh.

    --
    * Knghtbrd notes he has mashed potatoes for brains tonight
    yum, can I have some?
    um ...
    * Knghtbrd hides from Valkyrie

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