So where's all the Linux viruses? - Linux

This is a discussion on So where's all the Linux viruses? - Linux ; Why aren't there many Linux viruses? Some people claim it's because Linux is a "small target". There aren't nearly as many Linux boxes as there are Windows machines, so the virus writers go for the bigger target. If the number ...

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Thread: So where's all the Linux viruses?

  1. So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Why aren't there many Linux viruses? Some people claim it's because
    Linux is a "small target". There aren't nearly as many Linux boxes as
    there are Windows machines, so the virus writers go for the bigger
    target. If the number of Linux machines increased substantially, so
    this wisdom goes, the number of Linux viruses would very quickly rise as
    the virus writers homed in on the next big thing.

    That's a load of old cobblers, say I.

    There are quite a few Linux-haters out there. Just look at the idiots
    we get in here! It's apparent that many of the haters are in the
    computing business, and a fair number are technically proficient. So
    there will be a reasonable number who are good coders, and who are/could
    be reasonable virus writers.

    Its security is one of Linux's major attractions. I love watching
    newbies on Ubuntuforums, expressing delighted shock at the discovery
    that Ubuntu needs antivirus software only to keep other Windows users
    safe. A large, sustained presence of Linux-killing viruses on the
    internet would take away its chief attractions and discredit all those
    experts who have been saying so loudly and for so long that Linux is
    inherently more secure than Windows. So why aren't all the anti-Linux
    coders churning out the Tux-busters?

    Because it is no mean feat to create effective Tux-busters. Linux's
    multi-user heritage, its permissions system and its file structure make
    it a very difficult target. If Linux was as vulnerable as Windows, the
    rabid haters would have blown it away long ago. They haven't because
    they can't. Linux is bullet-proof!!


  2. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Firey Bird wrote:



    Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion, even you.

    > Linux is bullet-proof!!
    >


    Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a hole in your
    head.

    Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as human
    beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be expected that any
    thing we create as human beings will be perfect too, and that's not
    happening in your lifetime.

    Linux is under attack just like the rest. You can make a call to the
    ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.

    http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack

  3. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:

    > Firey Bird wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion, even you.
    >
    >> Linux is bullet-proof!!
    >>

    >
    > Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a hole in your
    > head.
    >
    > Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as human
    > beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be expected that any
    > thing we create as human beings will be perfect too, and that's not
    > happening in your lifetime.
    >
    > Linux is under attack just like the rest.


    But it doesn't succomb to these attacks as easily as the rest.

    > You can make a call to the
    > ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.
    >
    > http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack


    I have a few dozen rather computer-illiterate users who used to contract
    nasties on an almost monthly basis in their Windows days. Not one of these
    people has ever had a security problem using Linux -- and I can tell you
    that several of them are click-happy adolescents who are quite deaf for
    warnings about risks and the likes.

    Face it: Linux is a much more secure OS than Windows. For whatever reason.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

  4. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2008 13:16:15 +0000, Firey Bird wrote:

    > Why aren't there many Linux viruses? Some people claim it's because
    > Linux is a "small target". There aren't nearly as many Linux boxes as
    > there are Windows machines, so the virus writers go for the bigger
    > target. If the number of Linux machines increased substantially, so
    > this wisdom goes, the number of Linux viruses would very quickly rise as
    > the virus writers homed in on the next big thing.
    >
    > That's a load of old cobblers, say I.


    The "Linux is a small target" claim by Wintrolls & ignorant windoze users
    is rubbish. Linux is inherently more secure than windoze, but windoze
    apologists choose to ignore that.
    *If* their claim *was* true, with more of the Internet running on Linux
    servers than on windoze ones (even M$ Ballmer admitted that Linux servers
    account for 60% of the Internet), don't you think that there would have
    been *successful* attacks on them? Oh, there have been attacks, but
    nowhere *near* as successful as those on the windoze servers. So why pick
    a hard target, when you can knock over an easy one?

    Apache has a much larger market share than IIS, & yet IIS has many more
    security problems, exploits, viruses, etc. than Apache.

    The "popularity" argument propounded by wintrolls etc, falls flat on its
    face.

    See:- http://librenix.com/?inode=21

    Also see "Honeypot Project Finds Unpatched Linux PCs Stay Secure Online
    For Months" from 2004. If it applied then, it applies even *more so* today.
    http://www.networkcomputing.com/chan...rvers/56200435


    > There are quite a few Linux-haters out there. Just look at the idiots
    > we get in here! It's apparent that many of the haters are in the
    > computing business, and a fair number are technically proficient. So
    > there will be a reasonable number who are good coders, and who are/could
    > be reasonable virus writers.
    >
    > Its security is one of Linux's major attractions. I love watching
    > newbies on Ubuntuforums, expressing delighted shock at the discovery
    > that Ubuntu needs antivirus software only to keep other Windows users
    > safe. A large, sustained presence of Linux-killing viruses on the
    > internet would take away its chief attractions and discredit all those
    > experts who have been saying so loudly and for so long that Linux is
    > inherently more secure than Windows. So why aren't all the anti-Linux
    > coders churning out the Tux-busters?
    >
    > Because it is no mean feat to create effective Tux-busters. Linux's
    > multi-user heritage, its permissions system and its file structure make
    > it a very difficult target. If Linux was as vulnerable as Windows, the
    > rabid haters would have blown it away long ago. They haven't because
    > they can't. Linux is bullet-proof!!


    Heh, well I wouldn't claim it's "bullet-proof" but it doesn't suffer from
    the crap that windoze does.



  5. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Richard Rasker wrote:
    > MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >
    >> Firey Bird wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion, even you.
    >>
    >>> Linux is bullet-proof!!
    >>>

    >> Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a hole in your
    >> head.
    >>
    >> Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as human
    >> beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be expected that any
    >> thing we create as human beings will be perfect too, and that's not
    >> happening in your lifetime.
    >>
    >> Linux is under attack just like the rest.

    >
    > But it doesn't succomb to these attacks as easily as the rest.
    >
    >> You can make a call to the
    >> ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.
    >>
    >> http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack

    >
    > I have a few dozen rather computer-illiterate users who used to contract
    > nasties on an almost monthly basis in their Windows days. Not one of these
    > people has ever had a security problem using Linux -- and I can tell you
    > that several of them are click-happy adolescents who are quite deaf for
    > warnings about risks and the likes.
    >
    > Face it: Linux is a much more secure OS than Windows. For whatever reason.
    >


    I think that's going to start changing with Vista and subsequent Windows
    based O/S(s), if you bother to read the information in the links.







    But hey, nothing is bullet proof, not even Linux.

    Vista is not an open by default O/S anymore like its predecessors.






  6. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    On 2008-10-13, MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    > Firey Bird wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion, even you.
    >
    >> Linux is bullet-proof!!
    >>

    >
    > Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a hole in your
    > head.
    >
    > Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as human
    > beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be expected that any


    Some human beings are more fallable than others.

    [deletia]

    It helps if the relevant humans are fixating on technical issues
    rather focusing primarily (or entirely) on marketing issues.

    This principle holds up equally well for Detroit vs. Tokyo.

    --

    Unfortunately, the universe will not conform itself to
    your fantasies. You have to manage based on what really happens |||
    rather than what you would like to happen. This is true of personal / | \
    affairs, government and business.


    Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    http://www.usenet.com

  7. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    > Richard Rasker wrote:


    >>> Linux is under attack just like the rest.

    >>
    >> But it doesn't succomb to these attacks as easily as the rest.


    There's no proof of that at all:



    >> Face it: Linux is a much more secure OS than Windows. For whatever
    >> reason.

    >
    > I think that's going to start changing with Vista and subsequent
    > Windows based O/S(s), if you bother to read the information in the
    > links. But hey, nothing is bullet proof, not even Linux.


    All lies by Linux zealots to the contrary.


    > Vista is not an open by default O/S anymore like its predecessors.


    cola lusers are howling mad they can't find lots of reports of successful
    Vista 'in the wild' malware attacks.




  8. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    DFS wrote:
    > MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >> Richard Rasker wrote:

    >
    >>>> Linux is under attack just like the rest.
    >>> But it doesn't succomb to these attacks as easily as the rest.

    >
    > There's no proof of that at all:
    >
    >
    >
    >>> Face it: Linux is a much more secure OS than Windows. For whatever
    >>> reason.

    >> I think that's going to start changing with Vista and subsequent
    >> Windows based O/S(s), if you bother to read the information in the
    >> links. But hey, nothing is bullet proof, not even Linux.

    >
    > All lies by Linux zealots to the contrary.
    >
    >
    >> Vista is not an open by default O/S anymore like its predecessors.

    >
    > cola lusers are howling mad they can't find lots of reports of successful
    > Vista 'in the wild' malware attacks.
    >
    >
    >


    It can and it does happen on Vista no doubt when *clowns* will have done
    this.

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Another poster talking about Symantec's supplemental UAC feature.

    > Leave it to Symantec to "give the people what they want"
    > with no regard for the security implications.


    This is my response.

    ----------------------------------------------------------

    I wouldn't use the thing. It's about as bad as Application Control in
    3rd party personal FW(s) or other such nonsense snake-oil solutions. One
    wants the mouse click on the accept button when it's malware that was
    *accepted* and remembered so that one is not asked about it again.

    It's just below this one. Hey, I turned UAC off, because I have ran this
    way for 25 years from Win 9'x as root admin, and I have ran as
    user/admin on Win NT 4.0, Win 2k, and XP with full admin rights. I am
    good man. I am so good, computer savvy, and it can't happen to me on the
    Internet. Hey, so what if I get some malware that something detected.
    I'll wipe out the machine if it happens.

    But little did I know that a whole boat load of malware has come past my
    little security blanket, planted itself deep and can't be detected by my
    detection security blanket, and it's been this way for a long time. I
    don't even know how to go check things out for myself with other tools
    manually and look around and see what is running on the machine from
    time to time.

    Hey, I am good and my security detection blanket is good too. Everything
    is okay-dokey! :-P




  9. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    > Firey Bird wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion,
    > even you.
    >
    >> Linux is bullet-proof!!

    >
    > Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a
    > hole in your head.
    >
    > Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as
    > human beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be
    > expected that any thing we create as human beings will be
    > perfect too, and that's not happening in your lifetime.
    >
    > Linux is under attack just like the rest. You can make a call
    > to the ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.
    >
    > http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack


    This is old news and the problem has already been fixed by
    applying patches. It only affects those using OpenSSL keys,
    usage of other SSL's are not affected. It took some time to find
    it on the US-Cert website:

    http://www.us-cert.gov/press_room/mo...mary200808.pdf

    Monthly Activity Summary - August 2008

    Security Highlights

    Compromised SSH Keys Used in Attacks Against Linux-based Systems

    US-CERT became aware of active attacks against Linux-based
    computing infrastructures using compromised SSH keys. The attack
    appeared to initially use stolen SSH keys to gain access to a
    system, and then use local kernel exploits to gain root access.
    Once root access has been obtained, a rootkit known as "phalanx2"
    is installed.

    Phalanx2 appears to be a derivative of an older rootkit named
    "phalanx". Phalanx2 and the support scripts within the rootkit
    are configured to systematically steal SSH keys from the
    compromised system. These SSH keys are sent to the attackers who
    then use them to try to compromise other sites and systems of
    interest at the attacked site. US-CERT released a Current
    Activity on the public website (www.us-cert.gov) to detail this
    compromise and provide detection methods and mitigation strategies.
    which leads to:

    http://www.us-cert.gov/press_room/tr...alysisQ308.pdf

    Debian and Ubuntu OpenSSL Random Number Generator Vulnerability

    On May 13, 2008, Debian and Ubuntu released multiple security
    advisories to address a vulnerability in the random number
    generator used by the OpenSSL package included in the Debian
    GNU/Linux operating system and its derivatives. The vulnerability
    causes predictable cryptographic keys to be generated by any
    application that uses the affected versions of the OpenSSL
    package. Exploitation of this vulnerability could allow a remote,
    unauthenticated attacker with minimal knowledge of the vulnerable
    system and the ability to conduct a brute force attack against an
    affected application, to guess secret key material. Secondary
    impacts include authenticated access to the system through the
    affected service or the ability to perform man-in-the-middle attacks.

    Vulnerable keys include the following:
    • SSH keys
    • OpenVPN keys
    • DNSSEC keys
    • Key material used in X.509 certificates
    • Session keys used in SSL/TLS connections

    In addition, Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA) keys generated for
    digital signing and authentication should also be considered
    compromised. Any keys generated using the affected systems on or
    after September 17, 2006, may be vulnerable. Please note that
    keys generated with GnuPG or GNUTLS on the affected systems are
    not vulnerable because these applications use different random
    number generators from the flawed version of OpenSSL.

    US-CERT updated Current Activity on the website (www.us-cert.gov)
    and recommended that users apply the patch from the vendor and
    regenerate key material. More information regarding this
    vulnerability can be found in US-CERT Vulnerability Note,
    VU#925211. Additional instructions for generating new keys can be
    found at http://www.debian.org/security/key-rollover/.
    which is identified in:

    http://www.kb.cert.org/vuls/id/925211

    Vulnerability Note VU#925211
    Debian and Ubuntu OpenSSL packages contain a predictable random
    number generator

    Credit

    Thanks to Florian Weimer of the Debian security team for
    reporting this vulnerability. Debian, in turn, credits Luciano
    Bello with discovering this issue.

    Other Information
    Date Public: 2008-05-13
    Date First Published: 2008-05-15
    Date Last Updated: 2008-06-03
    It was the Debian Security Team who reported the vulnerability
    and subsequent patch was issued to correct the problem, which not
    yet had an opportunity to propogate in the wild.

    Thus, so much for the article link by the OP.

    Out of curiosity, I did a further search on US-Cert website using
    article key words, "linux", "customized", "ssh", "keys". Result is:

    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/body/bull...ultipleOS.html

    National Cyber Alert System
    Cyber Security Bulletin 2004 Summary

    Multiple Operating System Vulnerabilities

    The table below summarizes Multiple Operating System
    vulnerabilities that were identified during 2004. If further
    information is required, links are provided to the US-CERT Cyber
    Security Bulletin; however, the first three issues were produced
    as a CyberNotes document and they are not linked to the US-CERT
    web page.
    Following entries are related to SSH:

    Multiple Operating Systems - Windows / UNIX / Linux / Other

    [1] Vendor & Software Name
    [2] Common Name
    [3] Risk
    [4] Bulletin Issue

    [1] Juniper, Juniper Networks NetScreen firewalls with SSHv1
    enabled - ScreenOS prior to 5.0.0r8
    [2] NetScreen Firewalls ScreenOS Can Be Crashed By Remote Users
    Due to an SSHv1 Implementation Bug
    [3] Low
    [4] SB04-231

    [1] Matt Johnston, Dropbear SSH Server 0.42
    [2] Dropbear SSH Server DSS Verification Vulnerability
    [3] High
    [4] SB04-231, SB04-217

    [1] Multiple Vendors, Simon Tatham PuTTY 0.48- 0.55; TortoiseCVS
    TortoiseCVS 1.8
    [2] PuTTY Remote SSH2_MSG_DEBUG Remote Buffer Overflow
    [3] High
    [4] SB04-308
    Apparently this troll heard little about this Linux win:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03...left_standing/

    Only Ubuntu left standing, as Flash vuln fells Vista in Pwn2Own
    hacking contest

    Contestant overcomes bout of 'hacktile dysfunction'
    By Dan Goodin in Vancouver → More by this author
    Published Saturday 29th March 2008 21:27 GMT

    CanSecWest A laptop running a fully patched version of
    Microsoft's Vista operating system was the second and final
    machine to fall in a hacking contest that pitted the security of
    Windows, OS X and Ubuntu Linux. With both a Windows and Mac
    machine felled, only the Linux box remained standing following
    the three-day competition.
    OSX and Vista pwned by Ubuntu! Debian security unsurpassed.

    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  10. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    High Plains Thumper writes:

    > MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >> Firey Bird wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion,
    >> even you.
    >>
    >>> Linux is bullet-proof!!

    >>
    >> Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a
    >> hole in your head.
    >>
    >> Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as
    >> human beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be
    >> expected that any thing we create as human beings will be
    >> perfect too, and that's not happening in your lifetime.
    >>
    >> Linux is under attack just like the rest. You can make a call
    >> to the ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.
    >>
    >> http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack

    >
    > This is old news and the problem has already been fixed by applying
    > patches. It only affects those using OpenSSL keys, usage of other


    But it was still news. And your views on it taking the Debian crowd so
    long to notice their ssh key fallibility while you were here waving your
    penguin panties around on a stick telling us how perfect all Linux
    systems are?

    And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your own?

    *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear informed*


  11. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    High Plains Thumper wrote:
    > MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >> Firey Bird wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an opinion,
    >> even you.
    >>
    >>> Linux is bullet-proof!!

    >>
    >> Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a
    >> hole in your head.
    >>
    >> Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When we as
    >> human beings become infallible and perfect, then it can be
    >> expected that any thing we create as human beings will be
    >> perfect too, and that's not happening in your lifetime.
    >>
    >> Linux is under attack just like the rest. You can make a call
    >> to the ignorant masses and see if they will come and join in.
    >>
    >> http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack

    >
    > This is old news and the problem has already been fixed by applying
    > patches. It only affects those using OpenSSL keys, usage of other SSL's
    > are not affected. It took some time to find it on the US-Cert website:




    I don't care if it's old new. The fact remains that it happened.

    It's not going to be the last of it as Linux is NOT bullet proof.



    It's a moot point an it's worthless to me.

    >
    > Apparently this troll heard little about this Linux win:
    >


    You think it's about some kind of a God Damn contest you moron?

    I have not been hacked on Vista. It's all based on who is sitting behind
    the wheel and is doing the driving, nor was I hacked on Win XP too.

    I did get hacked back in 1999, as I ignorantly put a machine running IIS
    on Win 2K on the Internet without a firewall and not knowing how to
    protect IIS, the registry, the file system, and user accounts for a
    machine that faced the public Internet.

    I learned very quickly what I had to do to protect the machine.


  12. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Hadron wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper
    > writes:
    >
    >> MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >>> Firey Bird wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Opinions are a dime a dozen, and everyone has got an
    >>> opinion, even you.
    >>>
    >>>> Linux is bullet-proof!!
    >>> Yeah right, Linux is about a bullet-proof, like you have a
    >>> hole in your head.
    >>>
    >>> Linux is written and used by fallible human beings. When
    >>> we as human beings become infallible and perfect, then it
    >>> can be expected that any thing we create as human beings
    >>> will be perfect too, and that's not happening in your
    >>> lifetime.
    >>>
    >>> Linux is under attack just like the rest. You can make a
    >>> call to the ignorant masses and see if they will come and
    >>> join in.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.maximumpc.com/article/new...x_under_attack

    >> This is old news and the problem has already been fixed by
    >> applying patches. It only affects those using OpenSSL keys,
    >> usage of other

    >
    > But it was still news. And your views on it taking the Debian
    > crowd so long to notice their ssh key fallibility while you
    > were here waving your penguin panties around on a stick
    > telling us how perfect all Linux systems are?
    >
    > And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your own?
    >
    > *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear
    > informed*


    I post the truth from the US-Cert website on a fixed Linux
    security issue and Hadron rants are up.

    Indeed, way to go "Linux security magnate", "software QA
    consultant", "Usenet etiquette provocateur", "true Linux
    advocate", "Debian distro governor", "kernel hacker", "emacs
    user", "swapfile expert", "X specialist", "CUPS guru", "USB-disk
    server admin", "defragger professional", "newsreader magician",
    "hardware maven", "time coordinator", "email sage" and "OSS
    culling committee chairman" Hadron Quark, aka Hans Schneider, aka
    Richard, aka Damian O'Leary.

    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  13. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Hadron wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper writes:
    >
    >
    > But it was still news. And your views on it taking the Debian crowd so
    > long to notice their ssh key fallibility while you were here waving your
    > penguin panties around on a stick telling us how perfect all Linux
    > systems are?
    >
    > And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your own?
    >
    > *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear informed*
    >


    The person is some kind of a *clown*. This NG is so full of ****, and
    the people in the NG are so full of **** that there is not enough toilet
    paper and leaves in the world for them.

  14. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    DFS wrote:
    >
    > cola lusers are howling mad they can't find lots of reports of successful
    > Vista 'in the wild' malware attacks.


    Targeting the OS is now so old fashioned. Why bother with binaries,
    system calls, memory corruption when MS provides so many virus writer
    playground facilities?
    It is much easier to write an IE virus or a Word virus.
    What the heck the most succesful virus ever "i love you" was written in
    VBScript. It wasn't coded to do any system circumvention. It didn't need
    to, the door was right open.
    Just standard code. Infect, propagate, destroy host.

  15. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    DFS wrote:

    > MontGumDropped1 Paul wrote:
    >> Richard Rasker wrote:

    >
    >>>> Linux is under attack just like the rest.
    >>>
    >>> But it doesn't succomb to these attacks as easily as the rest.

    >
    > There's no proof of that at all:
    >
    >>> Face it: Linux is a much more secure OS than Windows. For whatever
    >>> reason.

    >>
    >> I think that's going to start changing with Vista and subsequent
    >> Windows based O/S(s), if you bother to read the information in the
    >> links. But hey, nothing is bullet proof, not even Linux.

    >
    > All lies by Linux zealots to the contrary.


    Sure DooFuS, Linux is much less secure than Windows. That's why half of all
    Windows desktop users have infected/hacked/hijacked machines, while the
    first infected/hacked/hijacked Linux desktop user still hasn't
    materialized, for all intents and purposes.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

  16. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    High Plains Thumper writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >>
    >> And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your own?
    >>
    >> *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear
    >> informed*

    >
    > I post the truth from the US-Cert website on a fixed Linux security
    > issue and Hadron rants are up.


    Why not post a link?


  17. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    Hadron wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper writes:
    >> Hadron wrote:
    >>
    >>> And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your
    >>> own?
    >>>
    >>> *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear
    >>> informed*
    >>>
    >>> [snippage restored] This is old news and the problem has
    >>> already been fixed by applying patches. It only affects
    >>> those using OpenSSL keys, usage of other SSL's are not
    >>> affected. It took some time to find it on the US-Cert
    >>> website:
    >>>
    >>> [snip]
    >>>
    >>> http://www.us-cert.gov/press_room/tr...alysisQ308.pdf
    >>>
    >>>
    Debian and Ubuntu OpenSSL Random Number Generator
    >>> Vulnerability
    >>>
    >>> On May 13, 2008, Debian and Ubuntu released multiple
    >>> security advisories to address a vulnerability in the
    >>> random number generator used by the OpenSSL package
    >>> included in the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and its
    >>> derivatives. The vulnerability causes predictable
    >>> cryptographic keys to be generated by any application that
    >>> uses the affected versions of the OpenSSL package. [snip]
    >>>
    >>> US-CERT updated Current Activity on the website
    >>> (www.us-cert.gov) and recommended that users apply the
    >>> patch from the vendor and regenerate key material. More
    >>> information regarding this vulnerability can be found in
    >>> US-CERT Vulnerability Note, VU#925211. Additional
    >>> instructions for generating new keys can be found at
    >>> http://www.debian.org/security/key-rollover/.

    >>
    >> I post the truth from the US-Cert website on a fixed Linux
    >> security issue and Hadron rants are up.

    >
    > Why not post a link?


    This is an example of:

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ark-troll.html

    Name: Hadron Quark (aka: Hadron, Damian O'Leary, Hans Schneider)

    Traits:

    * Homophobe (another closet gay wintroll?)
    * Often changes previous posters text in followups (see below)
    * Microsoft apologist
    * Habitual liar
    * [snip]
    * Exhibits serious reading comprehension difficulties
    * Quark is too stupid to understand when the point above is
    explained to him over and over again
    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  18. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2008 10:04:31 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> High Plains Thumper writes:
    >>> Hadron wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> And why do you keep posting other peoples work as your
    >>>> own?
    >>>>
    >>>> *snip High Plains Hypocrite's ludicrous attempt to appear
    >>>> informed*
    >>>>
    >>>> [snippage restored] This is old news and the problem has
    >>>> already been fixed by applying patches. It only affects
    >>>> those using OpenSSL keys, usage of other SSL's are not
    >>>> affected. It took some time to find it on the US-Cert
    >>>> website:
    >>>>
    >>>> [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.us-cert.gov/press_room/tr...alysisQ308.pdf
    >>>>
    >>>>
    Debian and Ubuntu OpenSSL Random Number Generator
    >>>> Vulnerability
    >>>>
    >>>> On May 13, 2008, Debian and Ubuntu released multiple
    >>>> security advisories to address a vulnerability in the
    >>>> random number generator used by the OpenSSL package
    >>>> included in the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and its
    >>>> derivatives. The vulnerability causes predictable
    >>>> cryptographic keys to be generated by any application that
    >>>> uses the affected versions of the OpenSSL package. [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>> US-CERT updated Current Activity on the website
    >>>> (www.us-cert.gov) and recommended that users apply the
    >>>> patch from the vendor and regenerate key material. More
    >>>> information regarding this vulnerability can be found in
    >>>> US-CERT Vulnerability Note, VU#925211. Additional
    >>>> instructions for generating new keys can be found at
    >>>> http://www.debian.org/security/key-rollover/.
    >>>
    >>> I post the truth from the US-Cert website on a fixed Linux
    >>> security issue and Hadron rants are up.

    >>
    >> Why not post a link?


    Just like Hardon Quack does, when he tells people to "google for it".

    > This is an example of:
    >
    > http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ark-troll.html
    >
    > Name: Hadron Quark (aka: Hadron, Damian O'Leary, Hans Schneider)
    >
    >
    > Traits:
    >
    > * Homophobe (another closet gay wintroll?)
    > * Often changes previous posters text in followups (see below)
    > * Microsoft apologist
    > * Habitual liar
    > * [snip]
    > * Exhibits serious reading comprehension difficulties
    > * Quark is too stupid to understand when the point above is
    > explained to him over and over again
    >



  19. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    High Plains Thumper wrote:



    You, you ass-wipe you are trying to pass judgment on someone?

    I liked the way you dropped your dirty tire-tracked stained drawers in
    vista.general, you ass-wipe, a personal visit from you.

  20. Re: So where's all the Linux viruses?

    William Poaster wrote:



    And here is the ass-hole on another fly-by.

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