Leaving the (MS) Office - Linux

This is a discussion on Leaving the (MS) Office - Linux ; I've used MS Office since the late, lamented WordPerfect DOS bit the dust in the late nineties. In 2003, I decided to write a 300-page book in OpenOffice because I'd suffered too many crashes and scary file manglings with MS ...

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Thread: Leaving the (MS) Office

  1. Leaving the (MS) Office


    I've used MS Office since the late, lamented WordPerfect DOS bit the
    dust in the late nineties. In 2003, I decided to write a 300-page book
    in OpenOffice because I'd suffered too many crashes and scary file
    manglings with MS Word. I have to say, OpenOffice Writer is MUCH
    better than MS Word 2007. Sure, you can find matching features in both
    programs, but OpenOffice is far more STABLE. I first used MS Word in
    the late 1980s. Twenty years later, it's still got a ton of bugs, not
    to mention features that Word users have complained about during all
    that time. (Bulleted lists!) It's as simple as this: OpenOffice
    developers listen to their customers; MS doesn't.


    http://blogs.computerworld.com/five_...ncial_meltdown

  2. Re: Leaving the (MS) Office

    After takin' a swig o' grog, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    >
    > I've used MS Office since the late, lamented WordPerfect DOS bit the
    > dust in the late nineties. In 2003, I decided to write a 300-page book
    > in OpenOffice because I'd suffered too many crashes and scary file
    > manglings with MS Word. I have to say, OpenOffice Writer is MUCH
    > better than MS Word 2007. Sure, you can find matching features in both
    > programs, but OpenOffice is far more STABLE. I first used MS Word in
    > the late 1980s. Twenty years later, it's still got a ton of bugs, not
    > to mention features that Word users have complained about during all
    > that time. (Bulleted lists!) It's as simple as this: OpenOffice
    > developers listen to their customers; MS doesn't.
    >

    >
    > http://blogs.computerworld.com/five_...ncial_meltdown


    More interesting:

    4) SharePoint: Alfresco. Microsoft SharePoint Server, to give it its
    due, does a fine job of organizing users' information so that you can
    easily get to it from a Web-based interface. There are just two
    things. One, it's proprietary, and, two; there's nothing SharePoint
    can do that Alfresco can't do. I mean that quite literally. When
    Microsoft was forced by the European Union to cough up its
    proprietary network protocols, it had to open up the SharePoint
    Protocol. So Alfresco starting adding support for the SharePoint
    Protocol so soon any application that can use SharePoint can also use
    Alfresco.

    . . .

    SharePoint requires you not only to buy the server, but also SQL
    Server and Windows Server 2003 or 2008, CALs (Client Access
    Licenses), and a hodgepodge of other odds and ends of Microsoft
    server software. My back-of-envelope calculations give me a cost, for
    five ordinary user CALs, getting everything on the cheap, and no list
    prices here, for about five grand. Alfresco? Do it yourself and it
    won't cost you a dime.

    Matt Asay weighs in on it (as a stakeholder, though) in the comments:

    Thanks for the notice. SharePoint is actually good software, but
    somewhat limited. If all you want to do is Microsoft Office document
    collaboration (and you already have Microsoft SQL Server as your
    database, Windows as your server, IIS, ActiveDirectory, etc.
    etc.), then SharePoint is a good tool.

    But then, Alfresco does exactly the same Microsoft Office
    collaboration, and I'd argue that we actually do Office integration
    and collaboration better than Microsoft does. (You don't have to
    believe me - you can download the software and give it a spin.)
    We also do it with whatever OS you want, whatever database you want,
    whatever application server you want, etc.


    --
    The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.
    -- Emerson

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