Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft - Linux

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  1. Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft


    Microsoft has made some progress developing a set of documents
    required as part of its antitrust consent decree, but the work could
    be accomplished much more quickly if the company took on a less
    grudging attitude, state and federal antitrust regulators said on
    Thursday....

    However, the complicated process of finalising the templates is taking
    longer than anyone expected. As stated in a status report released
    last week, the technical committee had to submit its own template
    design to Microsoft to work with because it was concerned the software
    company's template was not well-designed....

    "What we have today is the [technical committee] and its staff spoon-
    feeding the world's biggest PC company," he [Jay Himes, the antitrust
    bureau chief for the New York attorney general's office] said.
    "Something about that just isn't right."...

    Still, [Judge Colleen] Kollar-Kotelly questioned Microsoft's
    commitment. "I do appreciate that these things are complex, but I
    think it's interesting the [technical committee] is able to do what's
    necessary and bring Microsoft along, and not the other way around,"
    she said....

    "Something's missing here, and I'll leave it up to you to figure out
    what it is," she said.


    http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1...9494146,00.htm

  2. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft

    After takin' a swig o' grog, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu belched out
    this bit o' wisdom:

    >
    > Microsoft has made some progress developing a set of documents
    > required as part of its antitrust consent decree, but the work could
    > be accomplished much more quickly if the company took on a less
    > grudging attitude, state and federal antitrust regulators said on
    > Thursday....
    >

    >
    > http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1...9494146,00.htm


    More ass-dragging by a "grudging" Microsoft.

    What a surprise.

    --
    "... And remember: if you don't like the news, go out and make some of
    your own."
    -- "Scoop" Nisker, KFOG radio reporter Preposterous Words

  3. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft


    >
    > --
    > "... And remember: if you don't like the news, go out and make some of
    > your own."
    > * * * * * * * * -- "Scoop" Nisker, KFOG radio reporter Preposterous Words


    I used to hear this from Dave McQueen, on KSAN in the 1970's. Best
    radio station I ever heard, while it lasted.


  4. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft


    wrote in message
    news:cfa3028b-a5b6-4773-baaa-d4eedeeb6e84@b30g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > Microsoft has made some progress developing a set of documents
    > required as part of its antitrust consent decree, but the work could
    > be accomplished much more quickly if the company took on a less
    > grudging attitude, state and federal antitrust regulators said on
    > Thursday....
    >
    > However, the complicated process of finalising the templates is taking
    > longer than anyone expected. As stated in a status report released
    > last week, the technical committee had to submit its own template
    > design to Microsoft to work with because it was concerned the software
    > company's template was not well-designed....
    >
    > "What we have today is the [technical committee] and its staff spoon-
    > feeding the world's biggest PC company," he [Jay Himes, the antitrust
    > bureau chief for the New York attorney general's office] said.
    > "Something about that just isn't right."...
    >
    > Still, [Judge Colleen] Kollar-Kotelly questioned Microsoft's
    > commitment. "I do appreciate that these things are complex, but I
    > think it's interesting the [technical committee] is able to do what's
    > necessary and bring Microsoft along, and not the other way around,"
    > she said....
    >
    > "Something's missing here, and I'll leave it up to you to figure out
    > what it is," she said.
    >

    >
    > http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1...9494146,00.htm


    Numerous companies, including my own, do not seem to have any problem with
    interoperability with Microsoft servers and access to their APIs. It seems
    to me that it is unlikely that the failure of some of Microsoft's
    competitors to do this very same thing is either due to a lack of enthusiasm
    on the part of the competitor's technical staff or a lack of competence in
    general. How is it that others can achieve what these whiners cannot? We
    all have the same information.


  5. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft

    amicus_curious wrote:

    >
    > wrote in message
    > news:cfa3028b-a5b6-4773-baaa-d4eedeeb6e84@b30g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >> Microsoft has made some progress developing a set of documents
    >> required as part of its antitrust consent decree, but the work could
    >> be accomplished much more quickly if the company took on a less
    >> grudging attitude, state and federal antitrust regulators said on
    >> Thursday....
    >>
    >> However, the complicated process of finalising the templates is taking
    >> longer than anyone expected. As stated in a status report released
    >> last week, the technical committee had to submit its own template
    >> design to Microsoft to work with because it was concerned the software
    >> company's template was not well-designed....
    >>
    >> "What we have today is the [technical committee] and its staff spoon-
    >> feeding the world's biggest PC company," he [Jay Himes, the antitrust
    >> bureau chief for the New York attorney general's office] said.
    >> "Something about that just isn't right."...
    >>
    >> Still, [Judge Colleen] Kollar-Kotelly questioned Microsoft's
    >> commitment. "I do appreciate that these things are complex, but I
    >> think it's interesting the [technical committee] is able to do what's
    >> necessary and bring Microsoft along, and not the other way around,"
    >> she said....
    >>
    >> "Something's missing here, and I'll leave it up to you to figure out
    >> what it is," she said.
    >>

    >>
    >> http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1...9494146,00.htm

    >
    > Numerous companies, including my own, do not seem to have any problem with
    > interoperability with Microsoft servers and access to their APIs. It
    > seems to me that it is unlikely that the failure of some of Microsoft's
    > competitors to do this very same thing is either due to a lack of
    > enthusiasm on the part of the competitor's technical staff or a lack of
    > competence in
    > general. How is it that others can achieve what these whiners cannot? We
    > all have the same information.


    "What we have today is the [technical committee] and its staff spoon-feeding
    the world's biggest PC company," he said. "Something about that just isn't
    right."

    It's the usual foot-dragging from MS, aided and abetted by the lack of
    regulation from US federal government to bring them into line. Unlike their
    treatment by the EU, which has no axe to grind on their behalf - and whom
    they cannot bribe, but which defends the interests of consumers.

    --
    Facts are sacred ... but comment is free

  6. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft

    On Sep 27, 8:56*am, Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, ness...@wigner.berkeley.edu belched out
    > * this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    > >
    > > Microsoft has made some progress developing a set of documents
    > > required as part of its antitrust consent decree, but the work could
    > > be accomplished much more quickly if the company took on a less
    > > grudging attitude, state and federal antitrust regulators said on
    > > Thursday....
    > >


    Microsoft has been using the technical documents as a diversionary
    tactic. By openly resisting the requirement, and letting the DOJ
    raise this as an issue, the Judge can't claim that the DOJ is ignoring
    complaints, but at the same time, the DOJ can ignore the other
    measures that more directly impact Microsoft's protection and
    extension of their monopoly power.

    > >http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1...9494146,00.htm


    > More ass-dragging by a "grudging" Microsoft.


    It's a good strategy.

    > What a surprise.


    What is a surprise is that the judge hasn't more aggressively
    chastised the DOJ for ignoring the complaints raised by the states.



  7. Re: Antitrust regulators want a less 'grudging' Microsoft


    "Robin T Cox" wrote in message
    news:0kuDk.63582$E41.38705@text.news.virginmedia.c om...
    >
    > "What we have today is the [technical committee] and its staff
    > spoon-feeding
    > the world's biggest PC company," he said. "Something about that just isn't
    > right."
    >
    > It's the usual foot-dragging from MS, aided and abetted by the lack of
    > regulation from US federal government to bring them into line. Unlike
    > their
    > treatment by the EU, which has no axe to grind on their behalf - and whom
    > they cannot bribe, but which defends the interests of consumers.
    >

    "He" is just the leader of the whiner pack, trying to excuse his own
    inability to understand what he even asked for. So many companies partnered
    with Microsoft have no difficulty with understanding how these interfaces
    work and have incorporated them in their own products for over a decade.
    Why can't these others manage to do so without so much trouble?


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