[News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software - Linux ; -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Open source patents: Four companies offer green tech to public domain ,----[ Quote ] | So it turns out that the Eco-Patent Commons, which I wrote about back in | January, isn’t just another ...

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Thread: [News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software

  1. [News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software

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    Open source patents: Four companies offer green tech to public domain

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | So it turns out that the Eco-Patent Commons, which I wrote about back in
    | January, isn’t just another empty-handed cooperative industry effort.
    |
    | Three new companies, Bosch, DuPont and Xerox, have joined the effort and
    | another, Sony, has contributed an additional patent to the community.
    `----

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/green/?p=1341


    Recent:

    Intellectual Property Regime Stifles Science and Innovation, Nobel Laureates
    Say

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Patent monopolies are believed to drive innovation but they actually impede
    | the pace of science and innovation, Stiglitz said. The current “patent
    | thicket,” in which anyone who writes a successful software programme is sued
    | for alleged patent infringement, highlights the current IP system’s failure
    | to encourage innovation, he said.
    |
    | Another problem is that the social returns from innovation do not accord with
    | the private returns associated with the patent system, Stiglitz said. The
    | marginal benefit from innovation is that an idea may become available sooner
    | than it might have. But the person who secures the patent on it wins a
    | long-term monopoly, creating a gap between private and social returns.
    `----

    http://www.ip-watch.org/weblog/index.php?p=1129
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  2. Re: [News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software

    Verily I say unto thee, that Roy Schestowitz spake thusly:

    > Open source patents: Four companies offer green tech to public domain
    >
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    > | So it turns out that the Eco-Patent Commons, which I wrote about
    > | back in January, isn’t just another empty-handed cooperative
    > | industry effort.
    > |
    > | Three new companies, Bosch, DuPont and Xerox, have joined the
    > | effort and another, Sony, has contributed an additional patent to
    > | the community.
    > `----
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/green/?p=1341


    Yes, very altruistic I'm sure. However, rather than making restitution
    after the fact, wouldn't it be better for such companies to simply not
    abuse Intellectual Monopolies in the first place? Why exactly did they
    create these monopolies, if they didn't intend to abuse the "exclusive
    rights" to their academic findings? Must every creation be patented to
    "protect" it? Surely the mere existence of original work is sufficient
    evidence of prior art to "protect" it from further monopoly abuse. Can
    patents be voluntarily revoked by the "inventor"? Then why not do that
    instead of creating these patent "charities"? Perhaps it's because the
    companies involved would miss out on such good "PR opportunities", and
    undermine the false premise that Intellectual Monopoly is necessary to
    begin with. Yes, this is indeed "altruism" at its finest.

    Also, I'm not quite sure what any of this has to do with Free Software
    or even software of any kind. AFAICT these patents are about recycling
    and environmental sustainability, and seem to have been prompted by an
    obligation to meet legally enforced targets on emissions and waste. If
    these companies really wanted to give away their "exclusive rights" to
    their precious technology, then they could have chosen something a bit
    less obvious than something they were legally coerced into developing.
    Subsequently tossing the results into the beggars cap, seems more like
    contempt for environmental policy, than an acceptance of the principle
    of altruism in academia.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | By bucking Microsoft for open source, says Gunderloy, "I'm no
    | longer contributing to the eventual death of programming."
    | ~ http://www.linux.com/feature/142083
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.25.11-60.fc8
    09:02:09 up 29 days, 6:15, 4 users, load average: 0.74, 0.80, 0.41

  3. Re: [News] Companies Donate Paper Monopolies to Free Software

    Homer wrote:


    > Yes, very altruistic I'm sure. However, rather than making
    > restitution after the fact, wouldn't it be better for such companies
    > to simply not abuse Intellectual Monopolies in the first place? Why
    > exactly did they create these monopolies, if they didn't intend to
    > abuse the "exclusive rights" to their academic findings? Must every
    > creation be patented to "protect" it? Surely the mere existence of
    > original work is sufficient evidence of prior art to "protect" it
    > from further monopoly abuse. Can patents be voluntarily revoked by
    > the "inventor"? Then why not do that instead of creating these
    > patent "charities"? Perhaps it's because the companies involved
    > would miss out on such good "PR opportunities", and undermine the
    > false premise that Intellectual Monopoly is necessary to begin with.
    > Yes, this is indeed "altruism" at its finest.
    >
    > Also, I'm not quite sure what any of this has to do with Free
    > Software or even software of any kind. AFAICT these patents are
    > about recycling and environmental sustainability, and seem to have
    > been prompted by an obligation to meet legally enforced targets on
    > emissions and waste. If these companies really wanted to give away
    > their "exclusive rights" to their precious technology, then they
    > could have chosen something a bit less obvious than something they
    > were legally coerced into developing. Subsequently tossing the
    > results into the beggars cap, seems more like contempt for
    > environmental policy, than an acceptance of the principle of
    > altruism in academia.


    Above you will read the rambling and mutterings of a completely loony
    Linux zealot.


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
    Please visit www.linsux.org

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