Copy protection gone too far? - Linux

This is a discussion on Copy protection gone too far? - Linux ; http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7604405.stm ,---- | Hundreds of people have complained about the copyright protecting system | on the long-awaited game Spore. | | Scathing criticism of the Digital Rights Management (DRM) system have | been posted by reviewers on Amazon.com. | | ...

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Thread: Copy protection gone too far?

  1. Copy protection gone too far?


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7604405.stm

    ,----
    | Hundreds of people have complained about the copyright protecting system
    | on the long-awaited game Spore.
    |
    | Scathing criticism of the Digital Rights Management (DRM) system have
    | been posted by reviewers on Amazon.com.
    |
    | The DRM system used by Electronic Arts (EA) restricts the number of
    | times the game can be installed.
    `----


    --
    "I do believe I have stated that he should be given the benefit of the
    doubt, as is his right. If he did this crime, as it would seem, then he
    should be punished as the law requires."
    -- alt in alt.true-crime, comp.os.linux.advocacy

  2. Re: Copy protection gone too far?

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 19:08:22 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7604405.stm
    >
    > ,----
    >| Hundreds of people have complained about the copyright protecting system
    >| on the long-awaited game Spore.
    >|
    >| Scathing criticism of the Digital Rights Management (DRM) system have
    >| been posted by reviewers on Amazon.com.
    >|
    >| The DRM system used by Electronic Arts (EA) restricts the number of
    >| times the game can be installed.
    > `----


    Nothing new, unfortunately.
    High end DAW and video software has had copy protection schemes like that
    for years.
    A quick call to the company gets a code to reset the counter.

    And in fact it hasn't helped curb piracy at all for the most part.
    Many studios who are legal owners of said software actually run cracked
    copies because they don't want to pollute their drives with the copy
    protection code which can become unstable at the absolute worst time.
    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:

    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: Copy protection gone too far?

    In article ,
    Hadron wrote:

    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7604405.stm
    >
    > ,----
    > | Hundreds of people have complained about the copyright protecting system
    > | on the long-awaited game Spore.
    > |
    > | Scathing criticism of the Digital Rights Management (DRM) system have
    > | been posted by reviewers on Amazon.com.
    > |
    > | The DRM system used by Electronic Arts (EA) restricts the number of
    > | times the game can be installed.
    > `----


    There's some question as to how many of those are real. There have been
    organized campaigns to bias feedback on Amazon before. For example,
    there's been large scale tagging of ebooks with anti-DRM tags and
    slogans.

    Another example would be the reviews of Ron Paul's book. Shortly before
    that was published, there was an article on a popular Ron Paul site
    calling for people to go give the book 5 stars, and shortly thereafter,
    it in fact had several hundred 5 star reviews. (And then after leaving
    their five star reviews, it seems many of these people went around
    rating the other 5 star reviews as helpful). Checking the history of a
    random sample of these reviewers, it seems a large number never reviewed
    anything on Amazon until they came to leave their 5 star review of
    Paul's book, and they never reviewed anything else later, either.

    I look at the history of several of the Spore reviewers on Amazon, and
    there did seem to be a large number that were from new people. Even
    stranger, there were quite a few from people who had a single review
    from many years ago, then nothing until 2007 when they posted a poor
    Kindle review, and then nothing until their Spore review.

    --
    --Tim Smith

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