Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework. - Linux

This is a discussion on Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework. - Linux ; As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly released Managed Extensibility Framework as its license prevents its use beyond the Windows platform. This will prevent your .NET software from running on Linux or MacOS in the future.... The ...

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Thread: Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework.

  1. Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework.


    As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly released Managed
    Extensibility Framework as its license prevents its use beyond the
    Windows platform. This will prevent your .NET software from running on
    Linux or MacOS in the future....

    The second point that is worth making is that picking licenses like
    the MS-LPL for .NET software is shooting the .NET community in the
    foot. The LPL license is obviously an effort to tie things into the
    Windows platform, putting company first, community and developers
    second.

    The MS-LPL is a poisonous license, do not use it (do not confuse with
    the MS-PL which is a decent license, the extra "L" makes a big
    difference). - Miguel de Icaza


    http://tirania.org/blog/archive/2008/Sep-07.html

    Amazing what a difference an extra "L" makes!

  2. Re: Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework.

    nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:

    >
    > As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly released Managed
    > Extensibility Framework as its license prevents its use beyond the
    > Windows platform. This will prevent your .NET software from running on
    > Linux or MacOS in the future....
    >
    > The second point that is worth making is that picking licenses like
    > the MS-LPL for .NET software is shooting the .NET community in the
    > foot. The LPL license is obviously an effort to tie things into the
    > Windows platform, putting company first, community and developers
    > second.
    >
    > The MS-LPL is a poisonous license, do not use it (do not confuse with
    > the MS-PL which is a decent license, the extra "L" makes a big
    > difference). - Miguel de Icaza
    >

    >
    > http://tirania.org/blog/archive/2008/Sep-07.html
    >
    > Amazing what a difference an extra "L" makes!



    Micoshaft products are a waste of developer time.
    They piss on you from high above because only they
    have the source code and you have to follow their APIs and
    license crapola. I'd rather just code, and if I need
    to fix something, then with Linux, just look at the GPL'd source code
    instead of badly written API documentation thats written
    on shifting sands.



  3. Re: Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework.

    nessuno wrote:

    > As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly
    > released Managed Extensibility Framework as its license
    > prevents its use beyond the Windows platform. This will
    > prevent your .NET software from running on Linux or MacOS in
    > the future....
    >
    > The second point that is worth making is that picking licenses
    > like the MS-LPL for .NET software is shooting the .NET
    > community in the foot. The LPL license is obviously an effort
    > to tie things into the Windows platform, putting company
    > first, community and developers second.
    >
    > The MS-LPL is a poisonous license, do not use it (do not
    > confuse with the MS-PL which is a decent license, the extra
    > "L" makes a big difference). - Miguel de Icaza

    >
    > http://tirania.org/blog/archive/2008/Sep-07.html
    >
    > Amazing what a difference an extra "L" makes!


    Interesting ....

    http://www.codeplex.com/MEF/license

    [quote]
    2. Grant of Rights
    (A) Copyright Grant- Subject to the terms of this license,
    including the license conditions and limitations in section 3,
    each contributor grants you a non-exclusive, worldwide,
    royalty-free copyright license to reproduce its contribution,
    prepare derivative works of its contribution, and distribute its
    contribution or any derivative works that you create.

    (B) Patent Grant- Subject to the terms of this license, including
    the license conditions and limitations in section 3, each
    contributor grants you a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free
    license under its licensed patents to make, have made, use, sell,
    offer for sale, import, and/or otherwise dispose of its
    contribution in the software or derivative works of the
    contribution in the software.

    3. Conditions and Limitations

    [....]

    (F) Platform Limitation- The licenses granted in sections 2(A) &
    2(B) extend only to the software or derivative works that you
    create that run on a Microsoft Windows operating system product.
    [quote]

    Good point to prevent single OS vendor (Microsoft) lock-in.

    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

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