Wine..Still Ready for Consumption.. - Linux

This is a discussion on Wine..Still Ready for Consumption.. - Linux ; 1. Under Ubuntu Hardy gnome with effects set to "Normal" switching desktop's causes the application to disappear from view. It is still running, you just can't bring the Window back. Setting the "visual effects" to none solves the problem. 2. ...

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Thread: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

  1. Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..


    1. Under Ubuntu Hardy gnome with effects set to "Normal" switching
    desktop's causes the application to disappear from view.
    It is still running, you just can't bring the Window back.

    Setting the "visual effects" to none solves the problem.

    2. Under KDE when composing a message like this one, with 40Tude Dialog the
    alt key keeps activating for some reason. IOW the menu bar highlights as if
    I pressed alt-a or something.
    The keyboard is fine.
    I have typed one letter at a time trying to figure out what key/keys may be
    aggravating it but can't find a pattern.
    Weird.

    3. Sometimes even with visual effects set to normal, switching desktops
    causes the application running in Wine to leave just a black line on the
    screen.

    These are simple applications, like 40Tude for example which installs in a
    single directory. IOW no DLL's all over the place.
    It doesn't get any more simple than that.

    Wine HAS gotten much better but IMHO it's still far too buggy even for
    simple tasks.


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:

    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  2. Re: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

    I could not get almost anything to run under WINE.

    I really do not miss the Windows world, so it is not a huge problem,
    but I gave up on WINE.

    i

    On 2008-09-08, Moshe Goldfarb. wrote:
    >
    > 1. Under Ubuntu Hardy gnome with effects set to "Normal" switching
    > desktop's causes the application to disappear from view.
    > It is still running, you just can't bring the Window back.
    >
    > Setting the "visual effects" to none solves the problem.
    >
    > 2. Under KDE when composing a message like this one, with 40Tude Dialog the
    > alt key keeps activating for some reason. IOW the menu bar highlights as if
    > I pressed alt-a or something.
    > The keyboard is fine.
    > I have typed one letter at a time trying to figure out what key/keys may be
    > aggravating it but can't find a pattern.
    > Weird.
    >
    > 3. Sometimes even with visual effects set to normal, switching desktops
    > causes the application running in Wine to leave just a black line on the
    > screen.
    >
    > These are simple applications, like 40Tude for example which installs in a
    > single directory. IOW no DLL's all over the place.
    > It doesn't get any more simple than that.
    >
    > Wine HAS gotten much better but IMHO it's still far too buggy even for
    > simple tasks.
    >
    >


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  3. Re: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

    On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 09:29:15 -0500, Ignoramus15569 wrote:

    > I could not get almost anything to run under WINE.
    >
    > I really do not miss the Windows world, so it is not a huge problem,
    > but I gave up on WINE.


    I've been fairly lucky depending.
    I find that 90 percent of the problems with Wine are related to screen
    repaint type problems.

    40Tude runs fine as long as I don't turn on the eye candy in gnome.

    I even got NewsLeecher to run, sort of, but it was too dodgy.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:

    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  4. Re: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

    In article ,
    "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote:
    > Wine HAS gotten much better but IMHO it's still far too buggy even for
    > simple tasks.


    Something you might not know and might find interesting: Wine-based
    technology is being used by major publishers to bring games to the Mac.

    TransGaming has a thing called "Cider", based on Cedega (which is a fork
    of Wine), which developers can integrate in with the games to get Mac
    support. EA has used it to make several of its recent titles dual
    PC/Mac, including the just-released Spore.

    I've got Spore, and it works very well. Until I poked around in the
    application bundle and found files with "cider" and "wine" in their
    names, I hadn't realized that they had not developed a completely native
    version of Spore.

    My guess is that the reason this works a little better than when some
    random user downloads Wine and tries to get a game to run under it,
    because in the case of Cider, the game developer has made a conscious
    decision to use it, and so presumably they are able to make sure their
    game does nothing that would give it problems.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  5. Re: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

    On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 11:07:29 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:

    > In article ,
    > "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote:
    >> Wine HAS gotten much better but IMHO it's still far too buggy even for
    >> simple tasks.

    >
    > Something you might not know and might find interesting: Wine-based
    > technology is being used by major publishers to bring games to the Mac.
    >
    > TransGaming has a thing called "Cider", based on Cedega (which is a fork
    > of Wine), which developers can integrate in with the games to get Mac
    > support. EA has used it to make several of its recent titles dual
    > PC/Mac, including the just-released Spore.
    >
    > I've got Spore, and it works very well. Until I poked around in the
    > application bundle and found files with "cider" and "wine" in their
    > names, I hadn't realized that they had not developed a completely native
    > version of Spore.
    >
    > My guess is that the reason this works a little better than when some
    > random user downloads Wine and tries to get a game to run under it,
    > because in the case of Cider, the game developer has made a conscious
    > decision to use it, and so presumably they are able to make sure their
    > game does nothing that would give it problems.


    When Wine is configured and packaged with the game/program and the
    developers have tweaked it to work, then it's a different can of worms.

    Wine in the wild is not the same thing though.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:

    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  6. Re: Wine..Still Ready for Consumption..

    "Moshe Goldfarb." writes:

    > On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 11:07:29 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    >> In article ,
    >> "Moshe Goldfarb." wrote:
    >>> Wine HAS gotten much better but IMHO it's still far too buggy even for
    >>> simple tasks.

    >>
    >> Something you might not know and might find interesting: Wine-based
    >> technology is being used by major publishers to bring games to the Mac.
    >>
    >> TransGaming has a thing called "Cider", based on Cedega (which is a fork
    >> of Wine), which developers can integrate in with the games to get Mac
    >> support. EA has used it to make several of its recent titles dual
    >> PC/Mac, including the just-released Spore.
    >>
    >> I've got Spore, and it works very well. Until I poked around in the
    >> application bundle and found files with "cider" and "wine" in their
    >> names, I hadn't realized that they had not developed a completely native
    >> version of Spore.
    >>
    >> My guess is that the reason this works a little better than when some
    >> random user downloads Wine and tries to get a game to run under it,
    >> because in the case of Cider, the game developer has made a conscious
    >> decision to use it, and so presumably they are able to make sure their
    >> game does nothing that would give it problems.

    >
    > When Wine is configured and packaged with the game/program and the
    > developers have tweaked it to work, then it's a different can of worms.
    >
    > Wine in the wild is not the same thing though.


    Yup. Half the time all CEDEGA do is prepackage a few redefines and
    default settings and *bing* it works. Try getting little Johnny at home
    to figure it out though. Not a hope.

    --
    "You're a condescending, arrogant asshole, Quack."
    -- Tattoo Vampire in alt.os.linux.ubuntu, comp.os.linux.advocacy

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