This is what my customers want - Linux

This is a discussion on This is what my customers want - Linux ; As Hewlett-Packard steps up efforts to make Microsoft's operating system easier to use, some want to devise a rival version with Linux The carefully crafted ecosystem of tech companies built around Microsoft's Windows operating system is showing signs of strain. ...

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Thread: This is what my customers want

  1. This is what my customers want


    As Hewlett-Packard steps up efforts to make Microsoft's operating
    system easier to use, some want to devise a rival version with Linux

    The carefully crafted ecosystem of tech companies built around
    Microsoft's Windows operating system is showing signs of strain.
    Hewlett-Packard (HPQ), a longtime Microsoft ally, has quietly
    assembled a group of engineers to develop software that would make
    Windows Vista easier to use, or bypass some of its more onerous
    features. A Skunk Works of engineers at the company is even angling to
    replace Windows with an HP-assembled operating system, sources say....

    Others in HP's PC division are exploring the possibility of building
    an HP operating system for mainstream desktop and notebook computers
    based on the open-source Linux system, which competes with Windows,
    say people familiar with the company's plans....[worries at HP about
    Apple, tepid reaction to Vista huring...]

    Meanwhile, Apple has been gaining share in the U.S., where it
    accounted for 7.8% of PCs shipped in the second quarter, according to
    market researcher Interactive Data (IDC). Mac shipments grew nearly
    32% from a year earlier. Apple also enjoys fatter profit margins and
    more loyal customers than makers of Windows PCs, thanks to its
    delivery of both hardware and the Macintosh operating system....
    [worries that Apple will move into the sub-$1000 notebook range...]

    How Far to Take Linux?

    The division is also looking for ways to expand application of the
    company's QuickPlay technology, which lets users quickly boot up their
    machines with Linux, without waiting for Vista to start. [Also want
    to go beyond Vista limitations in multimedia...]

    HP could package Linux with the tools needed to work with HP's
    printers, digital cameras, and other add-on hardware, backed by the
    company's marketing and technical support. Yet further embracing Linux
    could also leave the company's innovations open to copying, due to
    Linux's open-source licensing terms. [Dell and Intel too...]

    Longtime Microsoft allies are making wider use of Linux in their
    products as well. Dell's new ultraportable Inspiron Mini 9 notebook,
    announced Sept. 4, gives customers the option of running Linux, and
    Dell may use the operating system in future digital music players,
    according to a person with knowledge of Dell's plans. Later this year,
    Dell plans to start selling business laptops equipped with a special
    low-power chip and an embedded version of Linux that let users bypass
    Vista to quickly read e-mail, view their calendars, and browse the Web
    when they flip open their screens. "This is what my customers want,"
    says Dell senior vice-president Jeff Clarke.

    Even Intel (INTC), the world's largest chip vendor and a staunch
    Microsoft ally for decades, is promoting Linux for a new class of
    ultraportable machines such as the Dell Mini, which uses its Atom
    processor, just when Microsoft is trying to spread Windows' influence
    to more portable devices. In August, Intel acquired London Linux
    developer OpenedHand to work on software for Atom devices. Too many
    defections could hurt Microsoft economically, since the company
    collects about $70 for each copy of Windows that PC makers preinstall
    on their machines.

    "It's an end run around Windows," says Rob Enderle, president of
    consultancy Enderle Group, about the efforts. "For both Dell and HP,
    there was a realization that Windows became an impediment, especially
    compared to Apple," he says. "The vendors are taking back some of the
    user experience."

    Add that to the growing list of repairs on Microsoft's Windows
    checklist.


    http://www.businessweek.com/technolo...095_077474.htm

  2. Re: This is what my customers want

    * nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >
    > "It's an end run around Windows," says Rob Enderle, president of
    > consultancy Enderle Group, about the efforts. "For both Dell and HP,
    > there was a realization that Windows became an impediment, especially
    > compared to Apple," he says. "The vendors are taking back some of the
    > user experience."
    >

    >
    > http://www.businessweek.com/technolo...095_077474.htm


    Wow, Enderle said that?

    --
    Too Late
    A large number of turkies [sic] went to San Francisco yesterday by
    the two o'clock boats. If their object in going down was to participate in
    the Thanksgiving festivities of that city, they would arrive "the day after
    the affair," and of course be sadly disappointed thereby.
    -- Sacramento Daily Union, November 29, 1861

  3. Re: This is what my customers want

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    Hash: SHA1

    ____/ Linonut on Monday 08 September 2008 11:32 : \____

    > * nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >>
    >> "It's an end run around Windows," says Rob Enderle, president of

    ^^^^^^^^^

    *LOL*

    So now he's a _PRESIDENT_ of a one-man group. He seems to have promoted
    himself. [Sheesh. Voices in the head /]


    >> consultancy Enderle Group, about the efforts. "For both Dell and HP,
    >> there was a realization that Windows became an impediment, especially
    >> compared to Apple," he says. "The vendors are taking back some of the
    >> user experience."
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.businessweek.com/technolo...095_077474.htm

    >
    > Wow, Enderle said that?


    Some things are so broken that you just can't lie about them. A friend told me
    about a strategy Microsoft has used for many years: it tries hard to convince
    people that 'other' things suck_ equally_ (there's a good name for this
    strategy, which I can't recall*), so they essentially try to convince people
    never to explore alternatives. This means that using SCO, vapourware and
    Munchkins works better for them than actually improved development.


    ___
    *There was an article about this from pseudonym 'Paul Murphy', but I don't know
    which one.


    - --
    "There's a lot of Linux out there -- much more than Microsoft generally signals
    publicly -- and their customers are using it..." --Paul DeGroot, a Directions
    On Microsoft analyst.
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  4. Re: This is what my customers want


    >
    > Some things are so broken that you just can't lie about them. A friend told me
    > about a strategy Microsoft has used for many years: it tries hard to convince
    > people that 'other' things suck_ equally_ (there's a good name for this
    > strategy, which I can't recall*), so they essentially try to convince people
    > never to explore alternatives.


    This strategy has been quite apparent in the propaganda war against
    Apple. It appears with statements like "Mac has problems, too", in
    the context of security, as if to say, Mac's security is as bad as
    Windows, or the type of (lack of) security on Windows is just inherent
    in the use of computers.


  5. Re: This is what my customers want

    On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 14:39:35 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:


    >>> "It's an end run around Windows," says Rob Enderle, president of

    > ^^^^^^^^^
    >
    > *LOL*
    >
    > So now he's a _PRESIDENT_ of a one-man group. He seems to have promoted
    > himself. [Sheesh. Voices in the head /]



    That sounds more like *YOU* Roy Schestowitz.
    Others seem to agree BTW.


    http://www.linux.com/feature/122470

    Here are a few:

    "The discussion was interesting except for the Roy Schestowitz person who
    seemed more interested in promoting his for-profit boycott sites then
    actually discussing issues. It's unfortunate that extremists and zealots
    like Schestowitz continually hijack the development of linux in order to
    promote their own financial agenda."

    "If Roy Schestowitz were a genuine contributor and had anything worthwhile
    to offer then it would be different. But he is clearly under informed and
    has yet to make any contribution to GNU/Linux. His only purpose is to
    bolster hits to his own (for profit) websites... websites which
    unfortunately are an embarrassment to the llinux community"


    "Please make Roy back up his statements with verifiable fact rather than
    the "it looks like", "smells like", "sounds like", "I think", "I assume"
    rubbish that he posts on his boycott novell site. It's not fair to make
    Jeff defend positions which are demonstrable conjecture and FUD-raking on
    the GNOME project. "

    "Jeff isn't defending the indefensible, he's being asked to defend the
    risible straw man. Jeff rebutts it specifically point-by-point, but he's
    essentially shadow boxing because Roy never accepts the answer, he shifts
    onto some other piece of equally unsupportable nonsense. If Roy even did
    *basic* research, he'd know the "Novell OOo" he's so worried about is
    carried by, oh, every single Linux distribution bar SuSE."


    "If Boycott Novell did a. basic research, b. issued *real* corrections (not
    "correction , see comments below"), c. stopped re-gurgitating material
    proven wrong, and d. stuck to the facts, I would bet few people would have
    a problem with it. It would get fewer readers and generate less advertising
    revenue though, so I don't see that happening...."


    "Well, linux.com is now off my list of places to go for reliable Linux
    information. It's hard enough fighting Linux disinformation without having
    a site like linux.com promoting a FUD spewing troll site like
    boycottnovell.com. It's also disingenuous to call Schestowitz a "regular
    contributor" there--it makes it sound like he is merely a submitter to
    someone else's site, implying that his material is vetted before being
    published. In fact, he is an editor there, and his submissions are not
    quality or fact checked--and so are rife with errors. Worse, when an error
    is pointed out, he does not correct it, and repeats the original post in
    many other forums."


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:

    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  6. Re: This is what my customers want

    * Roy Schestowitz peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > ____/ Linonut on Monday 08 September 2008 11:32 : \____
    >
    >> * nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "It's an end run around Windows," says Rob Enderle, president of

    >
    > *LOL*
    >
    > So now he's a _PRESIDENT_ of a one-man group. He seems to have promoted
    > himself. [Sheesh. Voices in the head /]
    >
    >> Wow, Enderle said that?

    >
    > Some things are so broken that you just can't lie about them. A friend told me
    > about a strategy Microsoft has used for many years: it tries hard to convince
    > people that 'other' things suck_ equally_ (there's a good name for this
    > strategy, which I can't recall*), so they essentially try to convince people
    > never to explore alternatives. This means that using SCO, vapourware and
    > Munchkins works better for them than actually improved development.


    This one's funny:

    http://www.roughlydrafted.com/2008/0...0-million-ads/

    Not sure if the link will work for you, looks like some jerk put UTF-8
    in the URL!

    Anyway:

    Thurrott was commenting on an email from Microsoft's senior
    vice president Bill Veghte to the company's employees,
    introducing its new $300 million ad campaign to "reintroduce
    Microsoft to viewers."



    "I'm glad Microsoft is finally telling its own story,"
    Thurrott wrote. "The bad guys have owned this conversation for
    too long."



    Was Thurrott addressing the US Department of Justice, who convinced
    the US District Court to convict Microsoft as a monopolist
    obstructing competition? Was he defending Microsoft from "bad
    guy" complaints raised by a number of US states which
    successfully presented a case that the company was cheating
    customers? Were the "bad guys" European Union regulators who
    insisted Microsoft not use Windows as a way to force PC makers to
    bundle Windows Media Player? Or how about Iowa, which sued Microsoft
    for falsely advertising that PCs that could not really not run Vista
    were "Vista capable"?

    No, the "bad guys" were Apple and its users, which Thurrott
    also referred to as the "iCabal."



    Here's one that's a page right out of the COLA-Troll's mouths:

    Thurrott is attacking Apple and Mac users ("They're bad
    people," he wrote, "They're people who lie and lie
    and lie, and the fanatics just suck it up.")

    . . .

    The real secret behind-the-scenes maneuvering in the tech world comes
    from Microsoft, which has ghost written a blizzard of white papers
    and surveys that attempt to point out that users are simply wrong and
    that Vista's problems are the fault of those pointing them out, and
    that free software costs more than expensive software, and that Vista
    PCs with a reduced security crisis are less vulnerable than Macs with
    no security crisis.




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