[News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles - Linux ; -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 An Open Source Mashup for Amazon EC2 ,----[ Quote ] | Part one of this article, Cloud Computing and Open Source, presented an | overview of several cloud computing solutions available today that are ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: [News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles

  1. [News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    An Open Source Mashup for Amazon EC2

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Part one of this article, Cloud Computing and Open Source, presented an
    | overview of several cloud computing solutions available today that are
    | friendly to open source. In this article we'll focus on one of these
    | solutions, Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and walk through the
    | development of an open source mashup for EC2. Amazon EC2 is a top player in
    | the cloud computing space and gives organizations the ability to leverage
    | world-class compute resources on a pay-as-you-go basis. It also provides a
    | rich set of APIs based on open standards and the ability to mix and match
    | other Amazon services such as Simple Queue Service (SQS), Simple Storage
    | Service (S3), SimpleDB, and Elastic Block Store (EBS), to build innovative
    | applications for the cloud.
    `----

    http://ldn.linuxfoundation.org/artic...hup-amazon-ec2

    Converting a NSLU2 into an RTorrent appliance

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | The irony of this firmware replacement (as this will require) is that the
    | Linksys NSLU2 is a kind of instant NAS; plug in a drive or two via USB and
    | you have a NAS. I picked up the NSLU2 at a Linux embedded programming
    | tutorial and since I reburned the machine in the act of applying power for
    | the first time I have only seen this as OpenWRT.
    `----

    http://jbcobb.net/?p=43


    Recent:

    The New Linux Developer Network

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | We’ve hired a new guy to run the LDN, Brian Proffitt. *He’s been hard at work
    | since the moment he started, asking lots of questions and building a new
    | infrastructure in an amazing amount of time. *And now, you can see the
    | results of his initial work.
    `----

    http://www.linux-foundation.org/webl...loper-network/


    Welcoming Brian Proffitt (and looking forward to the LDN)

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | As he disclosed there, his new role will be to help launch the Linux
    | Foundation's new Linux Developer Network site and project, which Amanda has
    | been already been working on for some time. When it launches, Brian will be
    | its Community Manager and Editor. After almost 8 years at JupiterMedia,
    | there are few people that know every part of the Linux landscape, and those
    | that live, develop and write (both positively and negatively) in and around
    | that landscape as well as Brian. We're both lucky and delighted to have
    | Brian aboard.
    `----

    http://www.consortiuminfo.org/standa...80719085526692


    Linux Market to Triple by 2012

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Analyst firm Research and Markets has just put out a project on Linux-based
    | server and client hardware sales, and is projecting that the market will more
    | than triple between 2007 and 2012.
    |
    | A market for a platform is not the same as an ecosystem for it, which is much
    | larger in that it includes the cost of people and third-party software and
    | services for the code that runs atop the platform. So the R&M Linux market
    | numbers might seem a little small. In any event, the consultancy pegged the
    | Linux product and services market for Linux running on servers and clients
    | (but not embedded systems) at $2.4 billion in 2007.
    `----

    http://www.itjungle.com/tlb/tlb031108-story07.html
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)

    iEYEARECAAYFAkjAc/4ACgkQU4xAY3RXLo6PtwCgmsMcukA+vM96OI8Qxr646AbD
    hqsAnRooBQOSCY6jszLZGSL9VZGit9YW
    =tRXN
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  2. Re: [News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles

    On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 23:49:18 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > An Open Source Mashup for Amazon EC2


    Nobody cares.

    Mashup?
    Sounds gay to me.....


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: [News] Linux Developer Network Starts Publishing Technical Articles

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Moshe Goldfarb.

    wrote
    on Thu, 4 Sep 2008 20:23:08 -0400
    :
    > On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 23:49:18 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >> Hash: SHA1
    >>
    >> An Open Source Mashup for Amazon EC2

    >
    > Nobody cares.
    >
    > Mashup?
    > Sounds gay to me.....
    >


    Think what you will; the term is more along the lines of
    combining bits and pieces of various other works into a
    derivative work -- mashing them together, if one will.

    There are copyright issues involved if the derivative work
    is later rebroadcast (for personal use it probably makes no
    difference, though posting on YouTube is arguably the same
    as more traditional publication, especially if the work is
    indexed so that an arbitrary person may find it easily).
    The Verve in particular ran into trouble from the Rolling
    Stones when the former created Bittersweet Symphony,
    a derivative work that included a sample from the Stones.

    It's a very dangerous area now, especially since Stephanie
    Lenz stands accused of violating Universal's copyrights
    (the owner of the song Let's Go Grazy as performed by
    Prince, which just happened to be playing in the background
    as she was recording her son's antics).

    http://www.illegal-art.org/audio/historic.html

    http://www.dvdnextcopysupportforum.c...ead.php?t=4898

    The good news (for us, not for the music companies):
    the courts have initially found in her favor,
    apparently.

    The bad news: it's in appeals, and far from done. Nor is
    it all that obvious (at least to me, anyway, without
    reading the decision) what "fair use" is; in this particular
    case I'd say it was more accidental than intentional.

    I consider all of this terribly ... well ... gay, but
    both sides do have a point; we don't want willy-nilly
    copying of music without at least some recognition
    of the creator thereof, nor do we want music to be
    so tightly locked down that we can't do reasonable
    things with it, especially if it's no more than
    background noise in an unintentionally derivative work.
    (In Stephanie's case, however, it is *not* background
    noise; her son was responding to the music as she was
    recording him.)

    But where's the middle ground? Good question.

    Welcome to the New World Order.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux. Because it's not the desktop that's
    important, it's the ability to DO something
    with it.
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

+ Reply to Thread