[News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology) - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology) - Linux ; -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Piracy as a core business strategy ,----[ Quote ] | Piracy is a way to drive adoption. Obviously, piracy only works if someone | cares about your product in the first place (otherwise, why ...

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Thread: [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology)

  1. [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology)

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    Piracy as a core business strategy

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Piracy is a way to drive adoption. Obviously, piracy only works if someone
    | cares about your product in the first place (otherwise, why would they bother
    | stealing it?). But perhaps it's a compelling strategy for some? It certainly
    | seems to work for Microsoft in emerging markets like China....
    `----

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10028027-16.html

    UK Band Admits It's 'Utterly Dependent' On Piracy

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | At some point, it won't make sense to post these sorts of examples any more
    | because it will just be common sense that bands can and do benefit from
    | so-called "piracy," but every time we post one of these stories, we get
    | people complaining that this couldn't possibly work for others.
    `----

    http://techdirt.com/articles/20080826/2227062107.shtml

    McKinnon loses European appeal

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | IT LOOKS LIKE 'Nasa Hacker' Gary McKinnon will be extradited to the US to
    | face computer abuse and cyber-terrorism charges, after the European Court of
    | Human Rights denied his appeal this morning.
    `----

    http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquir...uropean-appeal


    Recent:

    Elsevier steals, then copyrights other people's free stuff

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Reed Elsevier caught copying my content without my permission:
    |
    | * * I was not asked for, and did not give, permission for my work to appear
    | * * on that page, much less in that format. Needless to say, I felt a little
    | * * slighted.
    |
    | * * The website in question appears to be a custom version of the LexisNexis
    | * * search engine. This particular version appears to be Elsevier's own
    | * * custom version, intended for internal use. I don't have conclusive proof
    | * * of that, but the title bar at the top of the page reads, "Elsevier
    | * * Corporate", and the person who accessed my blog from that page had an IP
    | * * address that's registered to MD Consult, which is an Elsevier subsidiary.
    | * * My guess is that Elsevier's keeping track of news articles and blog posts
    | * * that mention them, along with the context in which they're mentioned.
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | Reed Elsevier Is Stealing My Words:
    |
    | * * I received an email from ScienceBlogling Mike Dunford that Reed Elsevier
    | * * had excerpted one of my posts. No problem there--I like it when people
    | * * read my stuff....except for one thing:
    |
    | * * The ****ers copyrighted my words.
    |
    | Copyright violation?:
    |
    | * * Apparently, publishing companies don't always get permission for the
    | * * materials they use, either. Mike Dunford caught Reed Elsevier copying his
    | * * content without permission (from Stephen Downes).
    `----

    http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2008/0..._copyright.php


    Related:

    Look for the silver lining

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Clamping down too hard on pirates may also encourage people to switch to
    | free, open-source alternatives. “It’s easier for our software to compete with
    | Linux when there’s piracy than when there’s not,” Microsoft’s chairman, Bill
    | Gates, told Fortune magazine last year.
    `----

    http://www.economist.com/opinion/dis...ry_id=11750492


    Microsoft Happy with the Evolution of Windows Vista Piracy

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | But the truth is that Microsoft is happy with the way Windows Vista
    | piracy is evolving. Is there a catch to this? No. The fact of the
    | matter is that Windows Vista has delivered a heavy blow to
    | software counterfeiters. The reason for this is the new Windows
    | Genuine Advantage security mechanism integrated into the
    | operating system.
    |
    | You may not notice this on the surface. On the surface, the
    | Internet is crawling with Windows Vista cracks, hacks and
    | workarounds. On the surface, every Windows Vista edition has
    | been cracked and is available for download via peer-to-peer
    | networks. But this is not the true extent of Windows Vista piracy.
    `----

    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Micro...cy-50577.shtml


    Microsoft seals its Windows and opens the door to Linux

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Now comes the really interesting question. With Vista's activation
    | technology, Microsoft has the power to stamp out piracy everywhere. But
    | will it choose to do so everywhere? After all, if folks in China or
    | Thailand or Ethiopia have to pay for Vista, they won't be able to run
    | it because they won't be able to afford the licence fee. In which case
    | they may finally wake up to the attractions of free software such as
    | Linux - and it's easy to imagine what that will do to Microsoft's
    | plans for world domination.
    |
    | It's a delicious prospect: Microsoft impaling itself on the horns
    | of a dilemma it has created for itself. Roll on Thursday.
    `----

    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/busin...956941,00.html


    Governments Must Reject Gates' $3 Bid to Addict Next Billion PC Users

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "Microsoft's strategy of getting developing nations hooked on its
    | software was clearly outlined by Bill Gates almost a decade ago," said
    | Con Zymaris, CEO of long-standing open source firm Cybersource.
    |
    | Specifically, Bill Gates, citing China as an example, said:
    |
    | "Although about 3 million computers get sold every year in China, but
    | people don't pay for the software," he said. "Someday they will, though.
    | As long as they are going to steal it, we want them to steal ours.
    | They'll get sort of addicted, and then we'll somehow figure out how to
    | collect sometime in the next decade."[1]
    `----

    http://www.cybersource.com.au/press/...t_billion.html
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  2. Re: [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology)

    Roy Schestowitz wrote:

    > Piracy as a core business strategy
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    > | Piracy is a way to drive adoption. Obviously, piracy only works if
    > | someone cares about your product in the first place (otherwise, why
    > | would they bother stealing it?).


    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/27/xp_nagware/

    "Microsoft has previously claimed that XP is more pirated than any other
    operating system.

    Well, that's not really hard, now is it? OS X has too small a market share,
    and Linux can't be pirated at all.

    And this one gave me a chuckle:

    "It reckons that the counterfeit rate for Vista is less than half that of
    XP, it would be below us to suggest that even the pirates have a hard time
    selling Vista."

    Well, perhaps if the pirates started selling upgrade rights to XP with their
    Vista knock-offs, they'd be more succesful ;-)

    > | But perhaps it's a compelling strategy
    > | for some? It certainly seems to work for Microsoft in emerging markets
    > | like China....
    > `----
    >
    > http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10028027-16.html




    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

  3. Re: [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology)

    On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 10:14:14 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:

    > Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >> Piracy as a core business strategy
    >>
    >> ,----[ Quote ]
    >>| Piracy is a way to drive adoption. Obviously, piracy only works if
    >>| someone cares about your product in the first place (otherwise, why
    >>| would they bother stealing it?).

    >
    > http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/27/xp_nagware/
    >
    > "Microsoft has previously claimed that XP is more pirated than any other
    > operating system.
    >
    > Well, that's not really hard, now is it? OS X has too small a market share,
    > and Linux can't be pirated at all.
    >
    > And this one gave me a chuckle:
    >
    > "It reckons that the counterfeit rate for Vista is less than half that of
    > XP, it would be below us to suggest that even the pirates have a hard time
    > selling Vista."
    >
    > Well, perhaps if the pirates started selling upgrade rights to XP with their
    > Vista knock-offs, they'd be more succesful ;-)
    >
    >>| But perhaps it's a compelling strategy
    >>| for some? It certainly seems to work for Microsoft in emerging markets
    >>| like China....
    >> `----
    >>
    >> http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10028027-16.html

    >
    >
    >
    > Richard Rasker


    Yet Linux is free everyday of the year and still can't manage to get above
    1 percent or so on the desktop.

    That's pretty sad considering Linux has been around for 15+ years.....

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  4. Re: [News] Musicians, Software Companies Love 'the Criminals' (Dan Glickman Terminology)

    Moshe Goldfarb. wrote:

    > On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 10:14:14 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    >> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>
    >>> Piracy as a core business strategy
    >>>
    >>> ,----[ Quote ]
    >>>| Piracy is a way to drive adoption. Obviously, piracy only works if
    >>>| someone cares about your product in the first place (otherwise, why
    >>>| would they bother stealing it?).

    >>
    >> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/27/xp_nagware/
    >>
    >> "Microsoft has previously claimed that XP is more pirated than any other
    >> operating system.
    >>
    >> Well, that's not really hard, now is it? OS X has too small a market
    >> share, and Linux can't be pirated at all.
    >>
    >> And this one gave me a chuckle:
    >>
    >> "It reckons that the counterfeit rate for Vista is less than half that
    >> of
    >> XP, it would be below us to suggest that even the pirates have a hard
    >> time selling Vista."
    >>
    >> Well, perhaps if the pirates started selling upgrade rights to XP with
    >> their Vista knock-offs, they'd be more succesful ;-)
    >>
    >>>| But perhaps it's a compelling strategy
    >>>| for some? It certainly seems to work for Microsoft in emerging markets
    >>>| like China....
    >>> `----
    >>>
    >>> http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-10028027-16.html

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Richard Rasker

    >
    > Yet Linux is free everyday of the year and still can't manage to get above
    > 1 percent or so on the desktop.


    Actually, recent estimates are more in the region of 2 percent and
    increasing steadily.

    > That's pretty sad considering Linux has been around for 15+ years.....


    That's not too bad considering that well over 95% of desktop computers on
    offer have Windows preinstalled.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

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