Who said it 2 - Linux

This is a discussion on Who said it 2 - Linux ; Who said it: Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency. The Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating system fragments. Any guesses? No fair looking it up! -- I know how a jam ...

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Thread: Who said it 2

  1. Who said it 2

    Who said it:

    Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency.
    The Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating
    system fragments.

    Any guesses? No fair looking it up!

    --
    I know how a jam jar feels...
    .... full of jam!


  2. Re: Who said it 2

    On Aug 27, 5:13*pm, Snit wrote:
    > Who said it:
    >
    > * * Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency.
    > * * The Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating
    > * * system fragments.


    Jim Zemlin - Executive Director of the Linux foundation.

    > Any guesses? *No fair looking it up!


    I cheated and looked it up.

    Here's the full quote

    Jim: I believe that as Linux grows and expands there will be several
    challenges. First will be one of continuing to allow more people to
    participate in the development process. Large parts of the world have
    not yet joined in the development process in China, India, Eastern
    Europe and other areas due to language barriers or low awareness of
    Linux. We hope to help that by providing forums where key developers
    can spread the word about Linux and open source in these regions.
    Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency. The
    Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating system
    fragments. Through our work at the Foundation with the Linux Standard
    Base we hope to provide a degree of consistency across the various
    versions of Linux so that developers can easily target the platform.
    Finally, I believe we will need to continue to respond to competitive
    FUD about legal risks around Linux or other ridiculous claims and I
    believe the Foundation is in a good role to make that response.

    One of the main reasons why Linux was as well supported as it was, was
    because it was a working kernel that had been published exclusively
    under the GPL (GPLv2). As a result, any enhancements or changes, any
    "forks" had to be submitted back to the development organization.
    Very often, the team had to make a choice between several excellent
    solutions, and a key element of this was assurances that the code
    being submitted was original code and not plagiarized.

    Many libraries and applications were released under the BSD license,
    but whenever possible, the code released under the GPL license is
    chosen over the BSD code. All of this is intended to provide the
    maximum possible compatibility and assurance of future compatibility.

    There are many Open Source libraries and toolkits, especially in the
    graphics and desktop domain, which compete, but remain compatible by
    following the guidelines of the ICCCM, a set of standards which
    assures that all ICCCM compliant Applications can run on all ICCCM
    desktops or window managers.

    Ironically, even UNIX is 99.9% compatible with other versions of UNIX
    as well as Linux, and when OSS compilers, libraries, and toolkits are
    used, that code will compile and run on Linux, nearly all versions of
    UNIX, and even Windows.

    In addition, Platform Independent Java is providing the ability to
    compile source into Java applications or plug-ins and run the code on
    most versions of UNIX and Linux.



  3. Re: Who said it 2

    "Rex Ballard" stated in post
    97fa80f9-7452-4461-a621-eef8bbdd27b0...oglegroups.com on 8/27/08
    5:19 PM:

    > On Aug 27, 5:13*pm, Snit wrote:
    >> Who said it:
    >>
    >> * * Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency.
    >> * * The Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating
    >> * * system fragments.

    >
    > Jim Zemlin - Executive Director of the Linux foundation.
    >
    >> Any guesses? *No fair looking it up!

    >
    > I cheated and looked it up.


    My goodness, man, have you no shame!

    > Here's the full quote
    >
    > Jim: I believe that as Linux grows and expands there will be several
    > challenges. First will be one of continuing to allow more people to
    > participate in the development process. Large parts of the world have
    > not yet joined in the development process in China, India, Eastern
    > Europe and other areas due to language barriers or low awareness of
    > Linux. We hope to help that by providing forums where key developers
    > can spread the word about Linux and open source in these regions.
    > Another challenge for Linux as a platform will be consistency. The
    > Unix wars are evidence of what can happen when an operating system
    > fragments. Through our work at the Foundation with the Linux Standard
    > Base we hope to provide a degree of consistency across the various
    > versions of Linux so that developers can easily target the platform.


    And the above is, again, not exactly what I say - I focus more on user
    issues and less on programmer issues - but very much of the same mind.
    Weird why there is so much resentment for those views in COLA.

    > Finally, I believe we will need to continue to respond to competitive
    > FUD about legal risks around Linux or other ridiculous claims and I
    > believe the Foundation is in a good role to make that response.
    >
    > One of the main reasons why Linux was as well supported as it was, was
    > because it was a working kernel that had been published exclusively
    > under the GPL (GPLv2). As a result, any enhancements or changes, any
    > "forks" had to be submitted back to the development organization.
    > Very often, the team had to make a choice between several excellent
    > solutions, and a key element of this was assurances that the code
    > being submitted was original code and not plagiarized.
    >
    > Many libraries and applications were released under the BSD license,
    > but whenever possible, the code released under the GPL license is
    > chosen over the BSD code. All of this is intended to provide the
    > maximum possible compatibility and assurance of future compatibility.
    >
    > There are many Open Source libraries and toolkits, especially in the
    > graphics and desktop domain, which compete, but remain compatible by
    > following the guidelines of the ICCCM, a set of standards which
    > assures that all ICCCM compliant Applications can run on all ICCCM
    > desktops or window managers.
    >
    > Ironically, even UNIX is 99.9% compatible with other versions of UNIX
    > as well as Linux, and when OSS compilers, libraries, and toolkits are
    > used, that code will compile and run on Linux, nearly all versions of
    > UNIX, and even Windows.
    >
    > In addition, Platform Independent Java is providing the ability to
    > compile source into Java applications or plug-ins and run the code on
    > most versions of UNIX and Linux.
    >
    >




    --
    God made me an atheist - who are you to question his authority?




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