Who said that? - Linux

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  1. Who said that?

    In regards to Linux:

    One of the big things that's difficult is consistency, and
    that's Window's biggest strength.

    Who said that?

    --
    One who makes no mistakes, never makes anything.


  2. Re: Who said that?

    On Aug 27, 5:09*pm, Snit wrote:
    > In regards to Linux:
    >
    > * * One of the big things that's difficult is consistency, and
    > * * that's Window's biggest strength.
    >
    > Who said that?


    Unfortunately, those added software libraries differ among Linux
    distributors, making it hard to know if an application like a word
    processor will function on a particular Linux computer.

    "One of the big things that's difficult is consistency, and that's
    Window's biggest strength," said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the
    Free Standards Group. (MSNBC.com is a Microsoft - NBC joint venture.)

    This is one of the reasons why there has been so much effort to
    standardize around LSB-3. That stands for Linux Standard Binary
    version 3.

    The quote was a preface to the new standard LSB-3.1

    The FSG, which counts among its members IBM Corp., Sun Microsystems
    Inc., Dell Inc. and Red Hat Inc., has previously certified server
    versions, or distributions, as conforming to its Linux Standard Base.
    The latest version of the LSB, 3.1, will be the first one to include a
    standard for desktop distributions.



    There are two popular, competing graphical user interfaces for Linux,
    KDE and GNOME. The LSB doesn't choose between them, but mandates
    compatibility at a lower level of the system. That makes it possible
    to develop applications that should run on a system regardless of
    which user interface is installed, the FSG said.


    Quotes are from
    http://tinyurl.com/5u575q

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12424790/
    or
    http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Linux_di...sktop_software

    This was from April 21, 2006.

    For the most part, LSB-3.1 has been a big help in creating a "standard
    Linux desktoop" while still allowing users the freedom to choose
    between LSB-3.1 compatible desktop systems.

    Here is an old status sheet of LSB 3.1 compatible systems
    http://www.linuxfoundation.org/en/LS...ibution_Status

    This is a bit more up to date

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/lsb-...ir.php?by_date


    > --
    > One who makes no mistakes, never makes anything.



  3. Re: Who said that?

    "Rex Ballard" stated in post
    5a6a7de0-ae12-4f0f-97d5-f4b32013e6e1...oglegroups.com on 8/27/08
    5:35 PM:

    > On Aug 27, 5:09*pm, Snit wrote:
    >> In regards to Linux:
    >>
    >> * * One of the big things that's difficult is consistency, and
    >> * * that's Window's biggest strength.
    >>
    >> Who said that?

    >
    > Unfortunately, those added software libraries differ among Linux
    > distributors, making it hard to know if an application like a word
    > processor will function on a particular Linux computer.
    >
    > "One of the big things that's difficult is consistency, and that's
    > Window's biggest strength," said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the
    > Free Standards Group. (MSNBC.com is a Microsoft - NBC joint venture.)
    >
    > This is one of the reasons why there has been so much effort to
    > standardize around LSB-3. That stands for Linux Standard Binary
    > version 3.
    >
    > The quote was a preface to the new standard LSB-3.1
    >
    > The FSG, which counts among its members IBM Corp., Sun Microsystems
    > Inc., Dell Inc. and Red Hat Inc., has previously certified server
    > versions, or distributions, as conforming to its Linux Standard Base.
    > The latest version of the LSB, 3.1, will be the first one to include a
    > standard for desktop distributions.
    >

    >
    >
    > There are two popular, competing graphical user interfaces for Linux,
    > KDE and GNOME. The LSB doesn't choose between them, but mandates
    > compatibility at a lower level of the system. That makes it possible
    > to develop applications that should run on a system regardless of
    > which user interface is installed, the FSG said.
    >

    >
    > Quotes are from
    > http://tinyurl.com/5u575q
    >
    > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12424790/
    > or
    > http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Linux_di..._for_desktop_s
    > oftware
    >
    > This was from April 21, 2006.
    >
    > For the most part, LSB-3.1 has been a big help in creating a "standard
    > Linux desktoop" while still allowing users the freedom to choose
    > between LSB-3.1 compatible desktop systems.
    >
    > Here is an old status sheet of LSB 3.1 compatible systems
    > http://www.linuxfoundation.org/en/LS...ibution_Status
    >
    > This is a bit more up to date
    >
    > https://www.linuxfoundation.org/lsb-...ir.php?by_date


    Excellent... and while not quite the same as my comments and my views, it is
    *very* consistent with and complimentary to my comments.


    --
    I know how a jam jar feels...
    .... full of jam!


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