Middle-Mouse button - Linux

This is a discussion on Middle-Mouse button - Linux ; On a sunny day (Mon, 1 Sep 2008 19:56:50 +0000 (UTC)) it happened DanS wrote in : >All this mention of a hot-key.....seems like it wouldn't be the most >optimum way for my app to be run. In my understanding, ...

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Thread: Middle-Mouse button

  1. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    On a sunny day (Mon, 1 Sep 2008 19:56:50 +0000 (UTC)) it happened DanS
    wrote in
    :

    >All this mention of a hot-key.....seems like it wouldn't be the most
    >optimum way for my app to be run. In my understanding, a hot-key setup
    >will run a program.


    Yes.


    >My program should be constantly running.


    You did mention that all your program does is present a menu with programs.
    So in that case the hotkey should launch a program that presents a menu.
    Once the user makes a selection from that menu, then that selection is executed,
    and the menu program killed.



    >All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    >can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this.


    It is simple.
    In its most simple way you could start an xterm with 'dialog', see man dialog, and
    http://www.cyberciti.biz/nixcraft/li...ch04sec10.html

    >Nor can I seem to
    >disable the middle-click paste either. It should be my choice right ?


    You can write your own OS and applications, but in Linux (as in MS windows),
    some standard ways for programs to eschange data, like cut and paste with middle mouse
    exist.
    If you do not respect middle mouse, you get into problems with many applications.
    the X server cut and paste happens to be that way.
    If you only run command line (X not started), then the same mouse functions are
    handled by 'gpm', you can kill gpm and lose cut and paste.

    You will find it is sometimes difficult to read all the man pages, in my view
    it is a learning curve, and it likely never ends :-)
    It is not for the weak, one needs to persists.


  2. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    DanS wrote:
    > Bernhard Agthe wrote in news:g90a40$q4r$1@daniel-
    > new.mch.sbs.de:
    > >> It started off as just a simple launcher program where the middle
    > >> click would just immediately show the menu to launch programs...

    > >
    > > Actually it sounds like you're trying to apply a Windows-problem to
    > > Linux. Don't bother - good launcher applications do exist and they
    > > usually are assigned to a hot-key.


    > I haven't found any good launcher programs. Of course, good in my opinion
    > is one that acts as mine does. The only motion required is to move a
    > finger 1/2" to the middle button and click. The one's I have seen require
    > you to click on the destop (which means possibly having to move/min/unmax
    > a window), or have a 'hot-spot' on the screen, or move to this edge or
    > that edge.


    a) (Mis)using the middle mouse button is like hooking into the
    Crtl-V key press event in Windows - you will get everybody mad
    at you since no application can do a 'copy' from the clipboard
    anymore. The middle mouse button has been used for this under
    Unix since long before Windows even appeared....

    b) You can, in principle, get the window manager to do something
    on basically any kind of event. It depends on the window manager
    you're using if it allows you to do that. But there are lots of
    different ones - some, in the name of "consistency of user expe-
    rience" give you less lee-way (ironically, it's the more fancy,
    Windows influenced window managers that don't seem to let you
    to) while the traditional ones (twm, fvwm etc.) let you more or
    less do whatever you want. The window manager is what can hook
    into all kinds of events, you have to learn how to ask it nicely.
    If yours won't let you you have to take it up with the whoever
    wrote that it, you may get a (hopefully) reasonable explanation
    of why it's considered a bad idea. And, of course, you can do a
    fork and change your private version to do whatever you want;-)

    > All this mention of a hot-key.....seems like it wouldn't be the most
    > optimum way for my app to be run. In my understanding, a hot-key setup
    > will run a program. My program should be constantly running. In order for
    > that to work, the hot key would need to be used to launch a second
    > instance of the app, which would then check for an existing instance, and
    > if it finds it, notify my previously running app to show itself.


    First question is why your program has to run all of the time, just
    using up memory? Unless you have to read in and later store lots of
    state information, starting a simple program isn't that much of a
    hassle. But even if you have good reasons for that, there are dif-
    ferent ways. You could e.g. have your program listen on a (local)
    socket or a FIFO etc. and just have the hot-key (or whatever you
    use) start a short program or script that sends a single data item
    (like the position of the mouse or whatever) or just a signal to
    your program to get it going. Only if this doesn't work you would
    have it start your obviously not yet running program. All that is
    hardly any work, so what's the big problem? What exactly are your
    criteria for the "most optimum way"? Optimal may be different be-
    tween Windows and Linux...

    > All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    > can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this. Nor can I seem to
    > disable the middle-click paste either. It should be my choice right ?


    Your choice as a user, yes, but not your choice as the programmer
    of a normal application.

    Windows comes from a single-tasking, single user tradition. That
    shaped a lot of the design decisions made. Since quite some time
    it's moving more and and more into a multi-tasking, nulti-direction
    that UNIX started with (and with each new Windows version people
    complain that they can't do things the way they were used to;-)
    One of the things you need in a real multi-tasking, multi-user en-
    vironment is to keep one process from influencing other processes
    unduly. Hooking into things like certain GUI events is something
    that a process shouldn't be able to do since there's simply no way
    it can find out what other processes may need this event for. (Ad-
    mittedly, there are a few exceptions like the ability of a program
    to "grab" the mouse or keyboard, but use of these features is usu-
    ally heavily frowned upon...)

    The "master controller" for your GUI, the window manager, which the
    user can configure to his/her likings, can do that, so it is the
    user that stays in control. But a "normal" program should never be
    able to negatively influence the behaviour of other programs (like
    taking away clicks on the middle mouse button). Only if the user
    (and not the programmer) wants your program to be able to do that
    (s)he can do that by telling the window manager to do something
    unusual on e.g. a middle mouse button click.

    Regards, Jens
    --
    \ Jens Thoms Toerring ___ jt@toerring.de
    \__________________________ http://toerring.de

  3. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Hi,

    actually I have no better answers than have already been presented.

    > I haven't found any good launcher programs. Of course, good in my opinion
    > is one that acts as mine does. The only motion required is to move a
    > finger 1/2" to the middle button and click. The one's I have seen require
    > you to click on the destop (which means possibly having to move/min/unmax
    > a window), or have a 'hot-spot' on the screen, or move to this edge or
    > that edge.


    Actually the "click the desktop" is what Jens Toerring mentioned with
    "interfering with system events" - applications grabbing events they
    shouldn't. This gets really annoying if you have to use rdesktop to
    access a different computer... In most cases you just press a hotkey and
    it launches a program.

    > All this mention of a hot-key.....seems like it wouldn't be the most
    > optimum way for my app to be run. In my understanding, a hot-key setup
    > will run a program. My program should be constantly running. In order for
    > that to work, the hot key would need to be used to launch a second
    > instance of the app, which would then check for an existing instance, and
    > if it finds it, notify my previously running app to show itself.


    But why do you want your program to run all the time, except for "it has
    always been this way"? Just imagine, your program would keep it's state
    in it's config file and recover the last state even after a reboot.
    Wouldn't that be even more convenient? So you still have one instance
    only (except you call your program multiple times on purpose). There are
    many interesting solutions for your problem. Just do not try to think
    "the Windows way" - that will get you to choose a suboptimal solution...

    By the way, the middle mouse button is handled in Windows, also, just
    not very consistent. In Unix (including Linux), the middle mouse button
    is handled very consistently and that is a very good thing. If you want
    your Launcher started by a mouse click, you could use buttons four and
    higher. You see, buttons 4 and 5 are the mouse wheel (=scrolling) which
    you wouldn't want to lose, would you? But your mouse might have some
    extra buttons which are yet unused?

    > Is this correct ?


    Depends on the solution you choose - this may be correct if you
    implement it this way, but may not if you implement it differently.

    > All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    > can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this. Nor can I seem to
    > disable the middle-click paste either. It should be my choice right ?


    Do you want to disable the "Windows-Key" in Windows OS? You wouldn't
    because some very essential functions are accessible through it (Windows
    Explorer: -, run program: - and so on). This is as much
    a feature of Windows as the copy-and-paste-via-mouse is a feature of
    Unix (including Linux). It is your choice to use it, but you should
    remember that some people share a computer with colleagues and they want
    a similar user interface on all machines they use, so a little
    consistency goes a long way.

    If you insist on using the middle mouse button, I know for a fact that
    you can re-assign mouse keys in fvwm window manager and you should be
    able to do so even at X-Server level, but I advise you not to change
    anything about the X-Server than (a) its configuration or (b) the
    Xmodmaps (key bindings). You could re-map the middle mouse button to the
    key code (provided you don't use that for your keyboards extra
    function keys). Then basically you assign that to launching your
    application (or a script which sends a signal to your app)...

    So probably you are asking the right questions, but not quite in the
    right way ;-)

    Have fun...


  4. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    On 2008-09-01, DanS wrote:

    > All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    > can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this. Nor can I seem to
    > disable the middle-click paste either. It should be my choice right ?


    if you really want to do that use twm for your window manager
    I'll let you map the middle button to a menu.

    unfortunately it looks worse than windows 95

    what you gain in configurable behavior you lose in looks.

    also many X apps are kind of hard to use wihout a middle button.
    (eg: xfig) but if your mouse has another useless button you could map
    that to your menu instead....

    Bye.
    Jasen

  5. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Hi,

    > >>All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    > >>can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this.

    > >
    > > It is simple.
    > > In its most simple way you could start an xterm with 'dialog', see man
    > > dialog, and


    If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    supposed to be compatible with dialog) but produce dialogues using X and
    gtk respectively.

    Cheers,
    John McCallum



  6. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    John McCallum writes:
    > If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    > zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    > supposed to be compatible with dialog)...


    Unfortunately, they aren't.
    --
    John Hasler
    john@dhh.gt.org
    Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, WI USA

  7. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    On a sunny day (Tue, 02 Sep 2008 07:04:57 -0500) it happened John Hasler
    wrote in <87wshubvo6.fsf@thumper.dhh.gt.org>:

    >John McCallum writes:
    >> If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    >> zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    >> supposed to be compatible with dialog)...

    >
    >Unfortunately, they aren't.


    I thought it was a cool idea, and immediately replaced 'dialog' with 'Xdialog'
    in one script.
    Worked fine in X:
    http://panteltje.com/panteltje/dvd/show
    Cannot speak for 'zenity', never used it.


  8. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    John McCallum writes:
    > If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    > zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    > supposed to be compatible with dialog)...


    I wrote:
    >Unfortunately, they aren't.


    Jan Panteltje writes:
    > I thought it was a cool idea, and immediately replaced 'dialog' with
    > 'Xdialog' in one script. Worked fine in X:...


    It partially works. I tried to support it with pppconfig but I had to give
    up.
    --
    John Hasler
    john@dhh.gt.org
    Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, WI USA

  9. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    John Hasler wrote:

    > John McCallum writes:
    >> If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    >> zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    >> supposed to be compatible with dialog)...

    >
    > Unfortunately, they aren't.


    Of course, compatibility isn't an issue for the OP as he would be writing
    from scratch. However they do not produce menus but rather dialogue boxes,
    which may be more of an issue to him.

    As an aside, zenity, the gnome project's version of Xdialog, is something I
    haven't used much yet. I am interested in using it for it's additional
    features like notification area icons. Is anyone aware of any gotcha's with
    it?

    Cheers,
    John McCallum


  10. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    On Sep 2, 10:50*am, John McCallum
    wrote:
    > John Hasler wrote:
    > > John McCallum writes:
    > >> If you want to do this in an X environment, I would recommend Xdialog or
    > >> zenity over dialog running in an xterm. They are very similar (they are
    > >> supposed to be compatible with dialog)...

    >
    > > Unfortunately, they aren't.

    >
    > Of course, compatibility isn't an issue for the OP as he would be writing
    > from scratch. However they do not produce menus but rather dialogue boxes,
    > which may be more of an issue to him.
    >
    > As an aside, zenity, the gnome project's version of Xdialog, is somethingI
    > haven't used much yet. I am interested in using it for it's additional
    > features like notification area icons. Is anyone aware of any gotcha's with
    > it?
    >
    > Cheers,
    > John McCallum


    It's lacking some widgets which dialog and Xdialog implement
    (password, time),
    as well as those that dialog implements that Xdialog doesn't (form,
    inputmenu).
    Compatibility with dialog is achieved via a shell script, which could
    behave
    differently with embedded quotes and escapes. On the positive side,
    its
    manpage does not assert that it's a drop-in replacement for dialog ;-)

    --
    Thomas E. Dickey
    http://invisible-island.net
    ftp://invisible-island.net

  11. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    >>>>> "Jan" == Jan Panteltje writes:

    Jan> What I use is fvwm, one of the oldest filemanagers I think,

    FVWM is not a file manager, but a _window_ manager.


    Jan> with 9 virtual screens, those virtual screens are in a pager
    Jan> to right. Does not MS call thos virtual desktops? I dunno.

    No. We X11 people called the virtual desktops FIRST, and have been
    using this feature for many years _before_ MS discovered this nice
    thing. Even so, MS has still failed to implement virtual desktops
    decently.


    Jan> It is much faster to type 'route' in an xterm. or 'ls -rtl
    Jan> /mnt/hdd4/video/*.ts' then to go to it with a file manager...
    Jan> And perhaps even safer.

    Not perhaps, but certainly.

    File manager? I use dir-ed inside Emacs.


    Jan> There are thousands of commands in Linux, over time you
    Jan> will learn some, you cannot possibly have them all in a menu
    Jan> structure.

    You could. But that'd be like finding your way through a dense
    forest.



    Jan> If you double click mouse left on a word in the xterm, then
    Jan> it gets selected. If you then click middle mouse, you can
    Jan> paste it anywhere in a text field. It is one of the most
    Jan> important features there is :-)

    I can't agree more. It's much more productive than cutting&pasting
    with Ctrl-C/V. Why did you forget to mention triple-clicking, which
    selects the whole line?



    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

  12. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    >>>>> "Mark" == Mark Hobley writes:

    Mark> I also would like to be able to use the keyboard to
    Mark> replicate all mouse movement, and to be able to record and
    Mark> script mouse events for the purpose of application
    Mark> automation.

    Use Emacs, then. It has got a web browser, file browser, news reader,
    any many other things that you can think of. The most important thing
    is that all these things running inside Emacs provides a unified,
    keyboard-friendly (but not mouse-unfriendly) user interface, with
    _searchable_ menus/buttons that can be operated using keyboard OR
    mouse. If you install emacspeak, Emacs can even read out the
    menus/buttons as well as the screen contents for you!


    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

  13. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    >>>>> "Bernhard" == Bernhard Agthe writes:

    Bernhard> Do you want to disable the "Windows-Key" in Windows OS?
    Bernhard> You wouldn't because some very essential functions are
    Bernhard> accessible through it (Windows Explorer: -, run
    Bernhard> program: - and so on).

    Indeed, many Windows users don't know these hot-keys. When I use them
    in front of them on their computers, they are surprised (sigh...!)
    that I can launch Explorer, cmd.exe and lock the screen without
    clicking any menus/buttons.


    So, maybe, most Windows users won't mind or even notice it if the
    key on their keyboards are unwired!



    Bernhard> So probably you are asking the right questions, but not
    Bernhard> quite in the right way ;-)

    Tell people what you intend to do, instead of how you want it done.




    --
    Lee Sau Dan u ~{@nJX6X~}

    E-mail: danlee@informatik.uni-freiburg.de
    Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

  14. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    LEE Sau Dan wrote:
    >>>>>> "Jan" == Jan Panteltje writes:

    >
    > Jan> What I use is fvwm, one of the oldest filemanagers I think,
    >
    > FVWM is not a file manager, but a _window_ manager.
    >
    >
    > Jan> with 9 virtual screens, those virtual screens are in a pager
    > Jan> to right. Does not MS call thos virtual desktops? I dunno.
    >
    > No. We X11 people called the virtual desktops FIRST, and have been
    > using this feature for many years _before_ MS discovered this nice
    > thing. Even so, MS has still failed to implement virtual desktops
    > decently.


    MS supposedly has an add-on for XP for multiple desktops; downloaded &
    insalled it on my XP system, but it doesn't work, typical for MS, I guess.
    >
    >
    > Jan> It is much faster to type 'route' in an xterm. or 'ls -rtl
    > Jan> /mnt/hdd4/video/*.ts' then to go to it with a file manager...
    > Jan> And perhaps even safer.
    >
    > Not perhaps, but certainly.
    >
    > File manager? I use dir-ed inside Emacs.
    >
    >
    > Jan> There are thousands of commands in Linux, over time you
    > Jan> will learn some, you cannot possibly have them all in a menu
    > Jan> structure.
    >
    > You could. But that'd be like finding your way through a dense
    > forest.


    Or through the abysmal mess of a menu structure in MS word looking for
    some feature you last used 6 months ago.
    Give me a simple man page that I can do searches in.

    >
    >
    >
    > Jan> If you double click mouse left on a word in the xterm, then
    > Jan> it gets selected. If you then click middle mouse, you can
    > Jan> paste it anywhere in a text field. It is one of the most
    > Jan> important features there is :-)
    >
    > I can't agree more. It's much more productive than cutting&pasting
    > with Ctrl-C/V. Why did you forget to mention triple-clicking, which
    > selects the whole line?
    >
    >
    >


  15. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Bernhard Agthe wrote in
    news:g9iruv$ifr$1@daniel-new.mch.sbs.de:




    > But why do you want your program to run all the time, except for "it
    > has always been this way"?


    The reason I want it to run all the time is because, ultimately, I want
    to use it as the shell....just as I do in Windows. It was originally
    written as a launcher only 5 or 6 years ago....middle-click...boom, menu
    popups up at the mouse location.

    Then, I expanded it to be the entire shell for Windows....taskswapper,
    system tray, clock, some quick Window controls for the current window,
    and another menu for some common windows ops, like shutdown, control
    panel, search, run....and a few menu items for options in my program
    itself.

    Here, this is the window that pops up when you middle click...

    http://users.adelphia.net/~thisnthat/shell.png

    I have been using this as a shell for a long time (continuous
    development). To navigate, it requires very little mouse movement. It
    does not have a 'desktop', although I did write a module for it that does
    present a desktop, but I don't use it. One thing that bugs me to no end
    is when I sit down at someone elses computer, and the desktop is covered
    top to bottom, left to right, with icons. My desktop has no icons, just
    the wallpaper. Clean.

    Using the desktop module though completely defeats my entire purpose for
    writing it in the first place.....to use a more convenient (to me) shell
    that is substantially more lightweight. More lightweight means it doesn't
    eat up 20 megs or more of RAM. I haven't rebooted in days, and it's only
    using 5.5 megs of RAM (which seems odd, because it's usually at about 7.5
    megs....wait, I did just clean up a bunch of code and actually dumped a
    feature I was working on.)



    >> All this talk of Linux and how it's so flexible and can do things you
    >> can't do in Windows, it seems as if I can't do this. Nor can I seem
    >> to disable the middle-click paste either. It should be my choice
    >> right ?

    >
    > Do you want to disable the "Windows-Key" in Windows OS? You wouldn't
    > because some very essential functions are accessible through it
    > (Windows Explorer: -, run program: - and so on). This
    > is as much a feature of Windows as the copy-and-paste-via-mouse is a
    > feature of Unix (including Linux). It is your choice to use it,


    And I don't...use the Win key that is. (Although I did code a few of
    those into my shell, I don't use them, it was an attempt at mimicking how
    explorer works if I ever did want to distribute.)

    (On a side-note, the WinKey shortcuts implemented using a keyboard hook.
    Is this, a keyboard hook, also a difficult thing in X ?)

    > but
    > you should remember that some people share a computer with colleagues
    > and they want a similar user interface on all machines they use, so a
    > little consistency goes a long way.


    As I said, this is an un-distributed app.

    > If you insist on using the middle mouse button, I know for a fact that
    > you can re-assign mouse keys in fvwm window manager and you should be
    > able to do so even at X-Server level,


    And what consequences does using fvwm have, versus using whatever I am
    using in Ubuntu right now ? Does it still support themes, is compiz still
    supported, etc ?

    Thanks.

  16. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Jan Panteltje wrote in
    news:g9hp85$kpr$1@aioe.org:

    > You did mention that all your program does is present a menu with
    > programs.


    Well, at the absolute very least that is what I need to do, but ultimately
    I would like to develop it into a complete shell replacement as I did for
    Windows.




  17. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    On 2008-09-04, DanS wrote:
    > Jan Panteltje wrote in
    > news:g9hp85$kpr$1@aioe.org:
    >
    >> You did mention that all your program does is present a menu with
    >> programs.

    >
    > Well, at the absolute very least that is what I need to do, but ultimately
    > I would like to develop it into a complete shell replacement as I did for
    > Windows.


    The source for twm is small enough to be understood by one man with out
    too much work.

    Bye.
    Jasen

  18. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Hi,

    > The reason I want it to run all the time is because, ultimately, I want
    > to use it as the shell....just as I do in Windows. It was originally
    > written as a launcher only 5 or 6 years ago....middle-click...boom, menu
    > popups up at the mouse location.


    OK, have your program keep its status in a file and start up whenever
    you request it with the "last" state. No need to run in the background ;-)

    > Then, I expanded it to be the entire shell for Windows....taskswapper, [...]


    Still the same, save you CPU some load and shutdown all the time ;-)

    Well, if you're looking for that, assign some hot key to launch a shell
    terminal in Linux. Everything you can think of is available in the Linux
    shell, you can even do movie-cutting, image manipulation or sound
    recording with a few keypresses on a Unix shell. You can watch a
    Star-Wars-Movie in the shell!

    > Here, this is the window that pops up when you middle click...

    Neat.

    > I have been using this as a shell for a long time (continuous

    [...]
    > the wallpaper. Clean.


    Well, that does actually bother me, too... but it is out of the current
    discussion.

    > And I don't...use the Win key that is. (Although I did code a few of
    > those into my shell, I don't use them, it was an attempt at mimicking how
    > explorer works if I ever did want to distribute.)


    So if you don't use the Win-Key, assign it to run your app instead of
    the windows-menu or . It will save you time because the fastest
    way for computer input is the keyboard. Assign hot-keys to all items in
    your launcher and you will notice you don't use the mouse anymore.

    > (On a side-note, the WinKey shortcuts implemented using a keyboard hook.
    > Is this, a keyboard hook, also a difficult thing in X ?)


    Well, in X it may be, but that is what you use your window manager for,
    it's a simple configuration item, just assign any program to any
    key-shortcut. Actually, do not try to assign the number or letter keys,
    you might want to enter a text containing that special number or letter ;-)

    > As I said, this is an un-distributed app.


    So? Whenever I get to a different computer, I want to use it without
    re-configuring everything, so consistency matters.

    > And what consequences does using fvwm have, versus using whatever I am
    > using in Ubuntu right now ? Does it still support themes, is compiz still
    > supported, etc ?


    Well, as mentioned before, fvwm is different. Give it a try, but do not
    expect "Windows-Vista" nor "Windows-3.1" look and feel. It is different
    and there surely is much less eye-candy. Themes? Yes, it did at a time
    when Windows 3.1 was still "state-of-the-art" - just change the config
    file. There's nothing special.

    Actually as someone else stated, if you want the "fancy" stuff, you have
    much more restrictions. And let me tell you, this is good - Ubuntu
    wouldn't be as successful if you had to change the "Registry" and reboot
    your computer whenever you want to change the desktop background.

    Another thought, if you write your app to keep it's state and to run
    from memory-stick, you can take it with you where ever you go and access
    it even at your colleague's or your friend's PC, wouldn't that be nice?

    Have fun and keep going ;-)


  19. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    Someone who Bernhard Agthe neglected to credit writes:
    > The reason I want it to run all the time is because, ultimately, I want
    > to use it as the shell....just as I do in Windows.


    Then what you really want to do is write your own window manager.

    Bernhard Agthe writes:
    > Well, if you're looking for that, assign some hot key to launch a shell
    > terminal in Linux.


    I don't think "shell" means the same thing to him as it does to us.
    --
    John Hasler
    john@dhh.gt.org
    Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, WI USA

  20. Re: Middle-Mouse button

    John Hasler wrote in
    news:878wu85c6z.fsf@thumper.dhh.gt.org:

    > Someone who Bernhard Agthe neglected to credit writes:
    >> The reason I want it to run all the time is because, ultimately, I want
    >> to use it as the shell....just as I do in Windows.

    >
    > Then what you really want to do is write your own window manager.
    >
    > Bernhard Agthe writes:
    >> Well, if you're looking for that, assign some hot key to launch a shell
    >> terminal in Linux.

    >
    > I don't think "shell" means the same thing to him as it does to us.


    Maybe not. Should I instead call it a 'Desktop' ?

    A Gnome/KDE/Xfce replacement ?


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