Linux Unicode Passwords - Linux

This is a discussion on Linux Unicode Passwords - Linux ; Hi everyone, Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a Linux password? Thanks, Kenneth...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Linux Unicode Passwords

  1. Linux Unicode Passwords

    Hi everyone,

    Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    Linux password?

    Thanks,
    Kenneth

  2. Re: Linux Unicode Passwords

    On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 23:27:03 -0700 (PDT), Kenneth wrote:
    > Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    > Linux password?


    Yes, but.

    You'd generally be advised against it if you wish to be able to login
    from diverse systems where you might not be able to easily input it.
    Also you'd have to have a suitable keymap system in place already
    on the local *dm or getty login screen (I'm sure it's doable, don't
    know if it's common practice though).

    --
    Mikko Rauhala - mjr@iki.fi - http://www.iki.fi/mjr/ >
    Transhumanist - WTA member - http://transhumanism.org/ >
    Singularitarian - SIAI supporter - http://singinst.org/ >

  3. Re: Linux Unicode Passwords

    On Aug 22, 2:27*pm, Kenneth wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    > Linux password?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Kenneth


    how can you type Chinese before you login?

  4. Re: Linux Unicode Passwords

    Mikko Rauhala wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 23:27:03 -0700 (PDT), Kenneth wrote:
    >> Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    >> Linux password?

    [character mapping problems...]

    Apart from the previouly mentioned troubles, using Unicode for passwords
    doesn't improve the security, eight characters out of the ASCII alphabet
    (chars #32-127) is quite much ;-) Adding stuffing bits and bytes
    (unicode characters or encodings take up more bits) does not increase
    the mathematical randomness - so it is rather a convenience matter.

    In fact I do agree with your idea of "localized passwords", but I know
    what a lot of trouble only about 7 special characters are (in my country
    they use "" and similar (an "a" with two dots above). You might try to
    log onto a computer via serial terminal and wonder why your password
    doesn't work... Even typing a simple text (or email on my PDA) all those
    special characters are trouble, so I rather not type them in many cases
    and stick to the basic English (actually Roman) charset if I can... Ever
    tried to port some C sources from Windows to Linux with the Windows guy
    using special characters in his comments? So if your keyboard has
    special letters on it, use them to remember your password, but try to
    type the passwords in roman letters ;-)

    Hope you have fun ;-)


  5. Re: Linux Unicode Passwords

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 21:07:07 -0700 (PDT) kevinkarin@hotmail.com wrote:
    | On Aug 22, 2:27?pm, Kenneth wrote:
    |> Hi everyone,
    |>
    |> Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    |> Linux password?
    |>
    |> Thanks,
    |> Kenneth
    |
    | how can you type Chinese before you login?

    Presumably the same way you type Chinese after you login. Things have to be
    set up to handle these characters before the login prompts.

    --
    |WARNING: Due to extreme spam, googlegroups.com is blocked. Due to ignorance |
    | by the abuse department, bellsouth.net is blocked. If you post to |
    | Usenet from these places, find another Usenet provider ASAP. |
    | Phil Howard KA9WGN (email for humans: first name in lower case at ipal.net) |

  6. Re: Linux Unicode Passwords


    On Aug 26 2008 09:01 phil wrote:
    > On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 21:07:07 -0700 (PDT) kevinkarin wrote:
    > | On Aug 22, 2:27?pm, Kenneth wrote:
    > |>
    > |> Is it possible to use unicode characters (ie. Japanese, Chinese) as a
    > |> Linux password?
    > |
    > | how can you type Chinese before you login?
    >
    > Presumably the same way you type Chinese after you login. Things have to be
    > set up to handle these characters before the login prompts.


    The problem one will run into is that not everywhere is an IME loaded
    when you need it. Or you prepare a PAM module or something for your
    sshd that does translate romaji input into CJK before passing it
    on...

    Oh, never forget Alt+16458!

+ Reply to Thread