Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0 - Linux

This is a discussion on Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0 - Linux ; http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html Almost exactly four years after the release of its predecessor, OpenGL 2.0, OpenGL 3.0 is here and now has a vendor officially supporting it. Nvidia announced this week that they are the first vendor to do such, with a ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

  1. Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html


    Almost exactly four years after the release of its predecessor, OpenGL 2.0,
    OpenGL 3.0 is here and now has a vendor officially supporting it. Nvidia
    announced this week that they are the first vendor to do such, with a beta
    driver package available that supports OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30.

    The drivers support a variety of new features available in the OpenGL 3.0
    spec, such as upgraded shading language, enhanced compression, 32bit
    floating point textures and a lot more. They are available for download as
    beta for both Windows XP and Windows Vista, though they have not yet
    released a driver for Mac OS or Linux.


    I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  2. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html
    >
    >
    > Almost exactly four years after the release of its predecessor, OpenGL 2.0,
    > OpenGL 3.0 is here and now has a vendor officially supporting it. Nvidia
    > announced this week that they are the first vendor to do such, with a beta
    > driver package available that supports OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30.
    >
    > The drivers support a variety of new features available in the OpenGL 3.0
    > spec, such as upgraded shading language, enhanced compression, 32bit
    > floating point textures and a lot more. They are available for download as
    > beta for both Windows XP and Windows Vista, though they have not yet
    > released a driver for Mac OS or Linux.
    >

    >
    > I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.


    Of course. For all its warts, Nvidia does provide fairly good Linux
    support. They'll probably do their implementations in order of "market
    share" .

    --
    Wit, n.:
    The salt with which the American Humorist spoils his cookery
    ... by leaving it out.
    -- Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary"

  3. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:LiBpk.11130$IB6.1681@bignews8.bellsouth.net.. .
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html
    >>
    >>
    >> Almost exactly four years after the release of its predecessor, OpenGL
    >> 2.0,
    >> OpenGL 3.0 is here and now has a vendor officially supporting it. Nvidia
    >> announced this week that they are the first vendor to do such, with a
    >> beta
    >> driver package available that supports OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30.
    >>
    >> The drivers support a variety of new features available in the OpenGL
    >> 3.0
    >> spec, such as upgraded shading language, enhanced compression, 32bit
    >> floating point textures and a lot more. They are available for download
    >> as
    >> beta for both Windows XP and Windows Vista, though they have not yet
    >> released a driver for Mac OS or Linux.
    >>

    >>
    >> I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.

    >
    > Of course. For all its warts, Nvidia does provide fairly good Linux
    > support. They'll probably do their implementations in order of "market
    > share" .


    The problem/issue with "new" technology like OpenGL 3 is that it takes
    time... sometimes a long time, until applications start supporting it. So
    having the latest shiny new video card with OpenGL 3 support doesn't get
    you much if there's little to no software that uses OpenGL 3.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  4. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html
    >>>
    >>> I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.

    >>
    >> Of course. For all its warts, Nvidia does provide fairly good Linux
    >> support. They'll probably do their implementations in order of "market
    >> share" .

    >
    > The problem/issue with "new" technology like OpenGL 3 is that it takes
    > time... sometimes a long time, until applications start supporting it. So
    > having the latest shiny new video card with OpenGL 3 support doesn't get
    > you much if there's little to no software that uses OpenGL 3.


    I agree. That will probably be an issue in the Windows world, too,
    at first, though not as much.

    --
    Our sires' age was worse that our grandsires'.
    We their sons are more worthless than they:
    so in our turn we shall give the world a progeny yet more corrupt.
    -- Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace)

  5. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:HICpk.10841$rD2.4547@bignews4.bellsouth.net.. .
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.
    >>>
    >>> Of course. For all its warts, Nvidia does provide fairly good Linux
    >>> support. They'll probably do their implementations in order of "market
    >>> share" .

    >>
    >> The problem/issue with "new" technology like OpenGL 3 is that it takes
    >> time... sometimes a long time, until applications start supporting it.
    >> So
    >> having the latest shiny new video card with OpenGL 3 support doesn't get
    >> you much if there's little to no software that uses OpenGL 3.

    >
    > I agree. That will probably be an issue in the Windows world, too,
    > at first, though not as much.


    It's definitely a problem on any platform. On Windows I think it's less of
    a problem but probably not for the same reason as you. I don't see it as
    being a big issue on Windows because there's a lot of Windows software that
    uses Direct-X instead of OpenGL. There are some apps that use OpenGL but
    it's a minority compared to the amount of software that's DirectX based.




    > --
    > Our sires' age was worse that our grandsires'.
    > We their sons are more worthless than they:
    > so in our turn we shall give the world a progeny yet more corrupt.
    > -- Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace)



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>
    >> I agree. That will probably be an issue in the Windows world, too,
    >> at first, though not as much.

    >
    > It's definitely a problem on any platform. On Windows I think it's less of
    > a problem but probably not for the same reason as you. I don't see it as
    > being a big issue on Windows because there's a lot of Windows software that
    > uses Direct-X instead of OpenGL. There are some apps that use OpenGL but
    > it's a minority compared to the amount of software that's DirectX based.


    Imagine that! Microsoft's own subsystem dominant on Microsoft's
    operating system!

    Still, one wonders what how the new version will change the balance, if
    at all.

    --
    Test-tube babies shouldn't throw stones.

  7. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:w4Dpk.10852$rD2.8451@bignews4.bellsouth.net.. .
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>
    >>> I agree. That will probably be an issue in the Windows world, too,
    >>> at first, though not as much.

    >>
    >> It's definitely a problem on any platform. On Windows I think it's less
    >> of
    >> a problem but probably not for the same reason as you. I don't see it as
    >> being a big issue on Windows because there's a lot of Windows software
    >> that
    >> uses Direct-X instead of OpenGL. There are some apps that use OpenGL but
    >> it's a minority compared to the amount of software that's DirectX based.

    >
    > Imagine that! Microsoft's own subsystem dominant on Microsoft's
    > operating system!


    I realize there's some bad feelings amongst linux users towards Direct-X
    (or anything MS) but I like the idea behind Direct-X.

    Most people think of "Direct X" as being a display technology akin to
    OpenGL. It is that but it's also a lot more.

    The "X" in Direct X can be replaced with a variety of devices. There's
    DirectDraw and Direct3D for writing to the display but there's also
    DirectSound, DirectInput, etc.

    The part of this that I like is that 'Direct X' provides a device
    independent API/abstraction. Developers/applications simply write to the
    DirectX API and as long as the device conforms to the DirectX API it will
    work with the apps.

    Developers don't have to deal with multiple audio systems or a slew of
    different input devices. As a developer, I like the idea that there's a API
    that abstracts the specific details of some 3D mouse with 8 buttons or some
    brand new sound card from the actual applications. Developers target the
    DirectX API and not the individual hardware.



    > Still, one wonders what how the new version will change the balance, if
    > at all.
    >
    > --
    > Test-tube babies shouldn't throw stones.



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  8. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >> Imagine that! Microsoft's own subsystem dominant on Microsoft's
    >> operating system!

    >
    > I realize there's some bad feelings amongst linux users towards Direct-X
    > (or anything MS) but I like the idea behind Direct-X.
    >
    > Most people think of "Direct X" as being a display technology akin to
    > OpenGL. It is that but it's also a lot more.
    >
    > The "X" in Direct X can be replaced with a variety of devices. There's
    > DirectDraw and Direct3D for writing to the display but there's also
    > DirectSound, DirectInput, etc.
    >
    > The part of this that I like is that 'Direct X' provides a device
    > independent API/abstraction. Developers/applications simply write to the
    > DirectX API and as long as the device conforms to the DirectX API it will
    > work with the apps.
    >
    > Developers don't have to deal with multiple audio systems or a slew of
    > different input devices. As a developer, I like the idea that there's a API
    > that abstracts the specific details of some 3D mouse with 8 buttons or some
    > brand new sound card from the actual applications. Developers target the
    > DirectX API and not the individual hardware.


    Yeah, that's the way it is with ALSA and OpenGL (and other APIs). And
    some of those (e.g. OpenGL and now PulseAudio) cross over between
    Windows and the various UNIXen.

    Microsoft seems to have unified the various sensory modalities (sound,
    sight, touch, and perspective), though unfortunately (for us) they
    only support their own product.

    --
    Record additional transactions on back of previous stub.

  9. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:9RDpk.10874$rD2.6572@bignews4.bellsouth.net.. .
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >>> Imagine that! Microsoft's own subsystem dominant on Microsoft's
    >>> operating system!

    >>
    >> I realize there's some bad feelings amongst linux users towards Direct-X
    >> (or anything MS) but I like the idea behind Direct-X.
    >>
    >> Most people think of "Direct X" as being a display technology akin to
    >> OpenGL. It is that but it's also a lot more.
    >>
    >> The "X" in Direct X can be replaced with a variety of devices. There's
    >> DirectDraw and Direct3D for writing to the display but there's also
    >> DirectSound, DirectInput, etc.
    >>
    >> The part of this that I like is that 'Direct X' provides a device
    >> independent API/abstraction. Developers/applications simply write to the
    >> DirectX API and as long as the device conforms to the DirectX API it
    >> will
    >> work with the apps.
    >>
    >> Developers don't have to deal with multiple audio systems or a slew of
    >> different input devices. As a developer, I like the idea that there's a
    >> API
    >> that abstracts the specific details of some 3D mouse with 8 buttons or
    >> some
    >> brand new sound card from the actual applications. Developers target the
    >> DirectX API and not the individual hardware.

    >
    > Yeah, that's the way it is with ALSA and OpenGL (and other APIs). And
    > some of those (e.g. OpenGL and now PulseAudio) cross over between
    > Windows and the various UNIXen.
    >
    > Microsoft seems to have unified the various sensory modalities (sound,
    > sight, touch, and perspective), though unfortunately (for us) they
    > only support their own product.


    True. To some extend many/most APIs are that way. If you call fopen() in C
    code it's going to work the same way on any platform with a C/C++ compiler.
    The filename may not be portable ("c:\foo.txt" vs. "/tmp/foo") but the
    person calling fopen() doesn't have to worry if it's a IDE, SATA, SCSI, USB
    or whatever drive and they don't need to worry about NTFS, ext3, XFS or
    whatever the underlying filesystem might be. So whether it's fopen() in C
    or SetPixel() in BASIC it's an abstraction.

    DirectX and OpenGL aren't all that different in that regard except that
    they operate at a higher level. Historically there have been a lack of
    "universal" APIs on platforms to support advanced sound and input and
    things like that. (There may have been but I'm not aware of it.) Not that I
    write games, sound or video intensive apps (I work more in the DB end of
    the software spectrum) but if I would appreciate consistent APIs if I did.

    At the database end of software we face the same issues. Everyone has their
    own database APIs with Oracle and OCI but Teradata, DB2 and everyone else
    has yet a different way of loading and unloading tables. There is ODBC
    which is pretty much universally supported but for bulk operations the
    performance hit becomes noticable.



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  10. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > At the database end of software we face the same issues. Everyone has their
    > own database APIs with Oracle and OCI but Teradata, DB2 and everyone else
    > has yet a different way of loading and unloading tables. There is ODBC
    > which is pretty much universally supported but for bulk operations the
    > performance hit becomes noticable.


    And even that (and SQL) has annoying differences.

    One thing is for sure -- you never run out of problems to solve when
    you're any kind of computer-based developer!

    --
    RoboHak - okay, the patch isn't broken, but my brain
    apparently is
    that's nothing new (;
    wc - hush.
    =>

  11. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:4FEpk.10903$rD2.3237@bignews4.bellsouth.net.. .
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> At the database end of software we face the same issues. Everyone has
    >> their
    >> own database APIs with Oracle and OCI but Teradata, DB2 and everyone
    >> else
    >> has yet a different way of loading and unloading tables. There is ODBC
    >> which is pretty much universally supported but for bulk operations the
    >> performance hit becomes noticable.

    >
    > And even that (and SQL) has annoying differences.


    Oh yeah! If it were just differences in SQL then it would be annoying
    enough. At least SQL is "standardized" but even then it can be annoyingly
    different. Then there's the non-standardized stuff like stored-procedures,
    triggers, views, etc and it quickly becomes a developers delight!


    > One thing is for sure -- you never run out of problems to solve when
    > you're any kind of computer-based developer!


    As Bill Clinton would say - "I feel your pain!"



    > --
    > RoboHak - okay, the patch isn't broken, but my brain
    > apparently is
    > that's nothing new (;
    > wc - hush.
    > =>



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  12. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    Linonut wrote:
    > * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> http://www.techspot.com/news/31253-n...opengl-30.html
    >>
    >>
    >> Almost exactly four years after the release of its predecessor, OpenGL 2.0,
    >> OpenGL 3.0 is here and now has a vendor officially supporting it. Nvidia
    >> announced this week that they are the first vendor to do such, with a beta
    >> driver package available that supports OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30.
    >>
    >> The drivers support a variety of new features available in the OpenGL 3.0
    >> spec, such as upgraded shading language, enhanced compression, 32bit
    >> floating point textures and a lot more. They are available for download as
    >> beta for both Windows XP and Windows Vista, though they have not yet
    >> released a driver for Mac OS or Linux.
    >>

    >>
    >> I'm sure that linux users will eventually get support for this.

    >
    > Of course. For all its warts, Nvidia does provide fairly good Linux
    > support. They'll probably do their implementations in order of "market
    > share" .



    A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.

  13. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    > their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.


    How would you know, though? (Not expressing doubt, just wondering.)

    --
    The bland leadeth the bland and they both shall fall into the kitsch.

  14. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    Linonut wrote:
    > * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    >> their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.

    >
    > How would you know, though? (Not expressing doubt, just wondering.)



    Hmmm ... good question now that you mention it ...

    http://www.nvidia.com/page/pg_20011011487525.html

    I guess I surmised it from the companies and degrees in their backgrounds.

  15. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > Linonut wrote:
    >> * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    >>> their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.

    >>
    >> How would you know, though? (Not expressing doubt, just wondering.)

    >
    > Hmmm ... good question now that you mention it ...
    >
    > http://www.nvidia.com/page/pg_20011011487525.html
    >
    > I guess I surmised it from the companies and degrees in their backgrounds.


    Hmm. None of them look like the classic UNIX geek (portly, balding,
    bearded, spectacles, and a smug expression).

    --
    The light of a hundred stars does not equal the light of the moon.

  16. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    Linonut wrote:
    > * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> Linonut wrote:
    >>> * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>
    >>>> A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    >>>> their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.
    >>> How would you know, though? (Not expressing doubt, just wondering.)

    >> Hmmm ... good question now that you mention it ...
    >>
    >> http://www.nvidia.com/page/pg_20011011487525.html
    >>
    >> I guess I surmised it from the companies and degrees in their backgrounds.

    >
    > Hmm. None of them look like the classic UNIX geek (portly, balding,
    > bearded, spectacles, and a smug expression).



    I sense hostility.

  17. Re: Nvidia the first vendor to ship OpenGL 3.0

    * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > Linonut wrote:
    >> * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> Linonut wrote:
    >>>> * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>
    >>>>> A few years back, I looked on the Nvidia website at the biographies of
    >>>>> their top management and found that almost all of them were old Unix guys.
    >>>> How would you know, though? (Not expressing doubt, just wondering.)
    >>> Hmmm ... good question now that you mention it ...
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nvidia.com/page/pg_20011011487525.html
    >>>
    >>> I guess I surmised it from the companies and degrees in their backgrounds.

    >>
    >> Hmm. None of them look like the classic UNIX geek (portly, balding,
    >> bearded, spectacles, and a smug expression).

    >
    > I sense hostility.


    Non sense.

    --
    Merchandise can be shipped only upon receipt of payment.

+ Reply to Thread