Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing - Linux

This is a discussion on Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing - Linux ; http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/...6etPF.s0YjtBAF Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with many users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company confirmed the outage in an unusual apology ...

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  1. Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/...6etPF.s0YjtBAF


    Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing
    41 minutes ago


    Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with many
    users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company confirmed
    the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled "We feel your
    pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem was caused by a
    "temporary outage in our contacts system that was preventing Gmail from
    loading properly."



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  2. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    * Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >
    > http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/...6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >
    > Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing
    > 41 minutes ago
    >
    > Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with many
    > users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company confirmed
    > the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled "We feel your
    > pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem was caused by a
    > "temporary outage in our contacts system that was preventing Gmail from
    > loading properly."
    >


    Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile due
    to a DNS misconfiguration?

    --
    "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access. I
    wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    (By Matt Welsh)

  3. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >>
    >> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/...6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>
    >> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing
    >> 41 minutes ago
    >>
    >> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with
    >> many
    >> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company confirmed
    >> the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled "We feel your
    >> pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem was caused by a
    >> "temporary outage in our contacts system that was preventing Gmail from
    >> loading properly."
    >>

    >
    > Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile due
    > to a DNS misconfiguration?


    Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm thinking of.

    This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it really
    is. Here's a quote from the article:


    The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the general
    proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according to blogger
    Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service proved to be a
    disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered substantial problems. "These
    growing pains, which are more evident each day that we rely more on
    service-based software efforts, indicate that you can't really trust the
    cloud at this juncture. It's too early and providers are learning as they
    go," Dignan wrote.

    While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality is that
    companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant systems. "Given
    that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk service, our operations
    came to a standstill this afternoon," blogger Om Malik wrote on his site.
    "We aren't a large company, but the losses are very real, especially in
    productivity."


    There are already massive security and confidentiality issues involved with
    cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible to host all of your
    internal documents, specs and communications with Google or Yahoo or
    whoever. I know where I work there's no way we would ever trust any 3rd
    party with our data.

    The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of outages
    that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this cloud needs to
    be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.


    > --
    > "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access. I
    > wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    > (By Matt Welsh)



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  4. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    > news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>
    >>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/

    tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>
    >>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>
    >>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with
    >>> many
    >>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled
    >>> "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem
    >>> was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system that was
    >>> preventing Gmail from loading properly."
    >>>

    >>
    >> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile
    >> due to a DNS misconfiguration?

    >
    > Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm thinking
    > of.


    >
    > This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    > really is.


    I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for local
    computing and it's viability.


    Here's a quote from the article:
    >
    >
    > The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    > general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according to
    > blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service proved
    > to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered substantial
    > problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident each day that we
    > rely more on service-based software efforts, indicate that you can't
    > really trust the cloud at this juncture. It's too early and providers
    > are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >
    > While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality is
    > that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant systems.
    > "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk service, our
    > operations came to a standstill this afternoon," blogger Om Malik wrote
    > on his site. "We aren't a large company, but the losses are very real,
    > especially in productivity."
    >

    >
    > There are already massive security and confidentiality issues involved
    > with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible to host all
    > of your internal documents, specs and communications with Google or
    > Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way we would ever trust
    > any 3rd party with our data.
    >
    > The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    > outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    > cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >
    >
    >> --
    >> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access. I
    >> wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >> (By Matt Welsh)

    >
    >
    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **






    --
    Rick

  5. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    "Rick" wrote in message
    news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/

    > tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>
    >>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>
    >>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon, with
    >>>> many
    >>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled
    >>>> "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem
    >>>> was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system that was
    >>>> preventing Gmail from loading properly."
    >>>>

    >>>
    >>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile
    >>> due to a DNS misconfiguration?

    >>
    >> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm thinking
    >> of.

    >
    >>
    >> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    >> really is.

    >
    > I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for local
    > computing and it's viability.


    So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to access the
    "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that works.

    Power outage = Single potential point of failure.
    Power outage + cloud outage = Multiple potential points of failure.

    Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they can keep
    running with a power failure. But if their data is local then a power
    failure shuts them down?

    Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a long term
    power failure but short term outages are avoided.



    > Here's a quote from the article:
    >>
    >>
    >> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    >> general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according to
    >> blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service proved
    >> to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered substantial
    >> problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident each day that we
    >> rely more on service-based software efforts, indicate that you can't
    >> really trust the cloud at this juncture. It's too early and providers
    >> are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>
    >> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality is
    >> that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant systems.
    >> "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk service, our
    >> operations came to a standstill this afternoon," blogger Om Malik wrote
    >> on his site. "We aren't a large company, but the losses are very real,
    >> especially in productivity."
    >>

    >>
    >> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues involved
    >> with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible to host all
    >> of your internal documents, specs and communications with Google or
    >> Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way we would ever trust
    >> any 3rd party with our data.
    >>
    >> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    >> outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    >> cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >>
    >>
    >>> --
    >>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access. I
    >>> wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >>> (By Matt Welsh)

    >>
    >>
    >> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Rick" wrote in message
    > news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/

    >> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>> with many
    >>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled
    >>>>> "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem
    >>>>> was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system that was
    >>>>> preventing Gmail from loading properly."

    >>>>
    >>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile
    >>>> due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>
    >>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm thinking
    >>> of.

    >>
    >>
    >>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    >>> really is.

    >>
    >> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for local
    >> computing and it's viability.

    >
    > So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to access
    > the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that works.


    So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >
    > Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage + cloud
    > outage = Multiple potential points of failure.


    So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >
    > Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they can
    > keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local then a
    > power failure shuts them down?


    No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That is
    your incorrect inference.

    >
    > Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a long
    > term power failure but short term outages are avoided.


    YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.

    >
    >
    >
    >> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    >>> general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according
    >>> to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service
    >>> proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered
    >>> substantial problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident
    >>> each day that we rely more on service-based software efforts, indicate
    >>> that you can't really trust the cloud at this juncture. It's too early
    >>> and providers are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>
    >>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality
    >>> is that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant
    >>> systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk
    >>> service, our operations came to a standstill this afternoon," blogger
    >>> Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large company, but the losses
    >>> are very real, especially in productivity."
    >>>

    >>>
    >>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues involved
    >>> with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible to host all
    >>> of your internal documents, specs and communications with Google or
    >>> Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way we would ever
    >>> trust any 3rd party with our data.
    >>>
    >>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    >>> outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    >>> cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access.
    >>>> I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >>>> (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    >
    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **






    --
    Rick

  7. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    "Rick" wrote in message
    news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >> "Rick" wrote in message
    >> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>>> with many
    >>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog. Titled
    >>>>>> "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the problem
    >>>>>> was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system that was
    >>>>>> preventing Gmail from loading properly."

    >>>>>
    >>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for awhile
    >>>>> due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm thinking
    >>>> of.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    >>>> really is.
    >>>
    >>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for local
    >>> computing and it's viability.

    >>
    >> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to access
    >> the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that works.

    >
    > So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?


    That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the net.
    As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents, contacts,
    phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm not 100%
    reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to send email
    or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work without web access.


    >>
    >> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage + cloud
    >> outage = Multiple potential points of failure.

    >
    > So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?


    That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the net.
    As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents, contacts,
    phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm not 100%
    reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to send email
    or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work without web access.

    >>
    >> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they can
    >> keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local then a
    >> power failure shuts them down?

    >
    > No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That is
    > your incorrect inference.


    And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the cloud
    goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and information stored
    locally an outage has less impact since lots of work can still be done
    locally.


    >>
    >> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a long
    >> term power failure but short term outages are avoided.

    >
    > YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.


    Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by accident.
    Yes, MINE. Mine and local. This way I can continue to function even if the
    "cloud" or internet access goes down. And this is a HUGE advantage over
    having to rely 100% on internet and some cloud in order to get work done.


    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    >>>> general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according
    >>>> to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service
    >>>> proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered
    >>>> substantial problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident
    >>>> each day that we rely more on service-based software efforts, indicate
    >>>> that you can't really trust the cloud at this juncture. It's too early
    >>>> and providers are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>>
    >>>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality
    >>>> is that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant
    >>>> systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk
    >>>> service, our operations came to a standstill this afternoon," blogger
    >>>> Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large company, but the losses
    >>>> are very real, especially in productivity."
    >>>>

    >>>>
    >>>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues involved
    >>>> with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible to host all
    >>>> of your internal documents, specs and communications with Google or
    >>>> Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way we would ever
    >>>> trust any 3rd party with our data.
    >>>>
    >>>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    >>>> outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    >>>> cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet access.
    >>>>> I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >>>>> (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Rick

    >>
    >>
    >> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  8. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:51:36 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Rick" wrote in message
    > news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>>>> with many
    >>>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog.
    >>>>>>> Titled "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the
    >>>>>>> problem was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system
    >>>>>>> that was preventing Gmail from loading properly."

    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for
    >>>>>> awhile due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm
    >>>>> thinking of.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    >>>>> really is.
    >>>>
    >>>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for
    >>>> local computing and it's viability.
    >>>
    >>> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to access
    >>> the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that works.

    >>
    >> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >
    > That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    > net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    > contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm
    > not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to
    > send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work
    > without web access.
    >
    >
    >
    >>> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage + cloud
    >>> outage = Multiple potential points of failure.

    >>
    >> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >
    > That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    > net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    > contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm
    > not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to
    > send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work
    > without web access.
    >
    >
    >>> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they
    >>> can keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local then
    >>> a power failure shuts them down?

    >>
    >> No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That
    >> is your incorrect inference.

    >
    > And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the
    > cloud goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and
    > information stored locally an outage has less impact since lots of work
    > can still be done locally.
    >
    >
    >
    >>> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a long
    >>> term power failure but short term outages are avoided.

    >>
    >> YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.

    >
    > Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by accident.


    Screw you.


    > Yes, MINE. Mine and local. This way I can continue to function even if
    > the "cloud" or internet access goes down. And this is a HUGE advantage
    > over having to rely 100% on internet and some cloud in order to get work
    > done.
    >


    You do understand that business has been "outsourcing" file storage for
    years, don't you? File storage has been outsourced for years. This is just
    the next logical step. "The network is the computer" is starting to
    happen. With all change there are the "Chicken Little" types. The sky is
    always falling for them.

    >
    >
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    >>>>> general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according
    >>>>> to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service
    >>>>> proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered
    >>>>> substantial problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident
    >>>>> each day that we rely more on service-based software efforts,
    >>>>> indicate that you can't really trust the cloud at this juncture.
    >>>>> It's too early and providers are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality
    >>>>> is that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant
    >>>>> systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk
    >>>>> service, our operations came to a standstill this afternoon,"
    >>>>> blogger Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large company, but
    >>>>> the losses are very real, especially in productivity."

    >>>>>
    >>>>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues
    >>>>> involved with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible
    >>>>> to host all of your internal documents, specs and communications
    >>>>> with Google or Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way
    >>>>> we would ever trust any 3rd party with our data.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    >>>>> outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    >>>>> cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet
    >>>>>> access. I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >>>>>> (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>> --
    >>>> Rick
    >>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >> --
    >> Rick

    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **






    --
    Rick

  9. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    "Rick" wrote in message
    news:ZKOdnVrf98wqvj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:51:36 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >> "Rick" wrote in message
    >> news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>>>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>>>>> with many
    >>>>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog.
    >>>>>>>> Titled "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said the
    >>>>>>>> problem was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts system
    >>>>>>>> that was preventing Gmail from loading properly."

    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for
    >>>>>>> awhile due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm
    >>>>>> thinking of.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable it
    >>>>>> really is.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for
    >>>>> local computing and it's viability.
    >>>>
    >>>> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to access
    >>>> the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that works.
    >>>
    >>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >>
    >> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm
    >> not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to
    >> send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work
    >> without web access.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage + cloud
    >>>> outage = Multiple potential points of failure.
    >>>
    >>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?

    >>
    >> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code. I'm
    >> not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be able to
    >> send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my work
    >> without web access.
    >>
    >>
    >>>> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they
    >>>> can keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local then
    >>>> a power failure shuts them down?
    >>>
    >>> No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That
    >>> is your incorrect inference.

    >>
    >> And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the
    >> cloud goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and
    >> information stored locally an outage has less impact since lots of work
    >> can still be done locally.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a long
    >>>> term power failure but short term outages are avoided.
    >>>
    >>> YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.

    >>
    >> Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by accident.

    >
    > Screw you.


    Ahhh yes. When confonted with facts that Rick can't refute he acts like a
    5th grade child, calls people names then runs away. Well done "advocate",
    well done.


    >> Yes, MINE. Mine and local. This way I can continue to function even if
    >> the "cloud" or internet access goes down. And this is a HUGE advantage
    >> over having to rely 100% on internet and some cloud in order to get work
    >> done.
    >>

    >
    > You do understand that business has been "outsourcing" file storage for
    > years, don't you? File storage has been outsourced for years. This is just
    > the next logical step. "The network is the computer" is starting to
    > happen. With all change there are the "Chicken Little" types. The sky is
    > always falling for them.


    Bull****. Name these businesses that outsource "file storage" because you
    are once again clueless. Why do they outsource file storage??? Is it because
    hard drives are so damn expensive?

    Let's see the list of companies that outsource storage or let's see a list
    of companies that make their living selling "file storage" to customers.



    >>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of the
    >>>>>> general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud, according
    >>>>>> to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's MobileMe service
    >>>>>> proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage gird suffered
    >>>>>> substantial problems. "These growing pains, which are more evident
    >>>>>> each day that we rely more on service-based software efforts,
    >>>>>> indicate that you can't really trust the cloud at this juncture.
    >>>>>> It's too early and providers are learning as they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the reality
    >>>>>> is that companies -- even very small companies -- need redundant
    >>>>>> systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's Gmail and GTalk
    >>>>>> service, our operations came to a standstill this afternoon,"
    >>>>>> blogger Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large company, but
    >>>>>> the losses are very real, especially in productivity."

    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues
    >>>>>> involved with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be feasible
    >>>>>> to host all of your internal documents, specs and communications
    >>>>>> with Google or Yahoo or whoever. I know where I work there's no way
    >>>>>> we would ever trust any 3rd party with our data.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix of
    >>>>>> outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and this
    >>>>>> cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet
    >>>>>>> access. I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?"
    >>>>>>> (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Rick
    >>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>> --
    >>> Rick

    >> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  10. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 14:18:41 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Rick" wrote in message
    > news:ZKOdnVrf98wqvj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:51:36 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>> news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>>> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>>>>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>>>>>> with many
    >>>>>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>>>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog.
    >>>>>>>>> Titled "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said
    >>>>>>>>> the problem was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts
    >>>>>>>>> system that was preventing Gmail from loading properly."
    >>>>>>>>>

    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for
    >>>>>>>> awhile due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm
    >>>>>>> thinking of.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable
    >>>>>>> it really is.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for
    >>>>>> local computing and it's viability.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to
    >>>>> access the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that
    >>>>> works.
    >>>>
    >>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>
    >>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >>> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >>> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code.
    >>> I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be
    >>> able to send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my
    >>> work without web access.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage +
    >>>>> cloud outage = Multiple potential points of failure.
    >>>>
    >>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>
    >>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >>> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >>> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code.
    >>> I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be
    >>> able to send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my
    >>> work without web access.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they
    >>>>> can keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local
    >>>>> then a power failure shuts them down?
    >>>>
    >>>> No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That
    >>>> is your incorrect inference.
    >>>
    >>> And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the
    >>> cloud goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and
    >>> information stored locally an outage has less impact since lots of
    >>> work can still be done locally.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a
    >>>>> long term power failure but short term outages are avoided.
    >>>>
    >>>> YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.
    >>>
    >>> Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by
    >>> accident.

    >>
    >> Screw you.

    >
    > Ahhh yes. When confonted with facts that Rick can't refute he acts like
    > a 5th grade child, calls people names then runs away. Well done
    > "advocate", well done.
    >


    So, you allowed to insult me with: "Glad to hear that you finally "get it"
    - even if it's by accident." without any response? You really should learn
    English. Saying "screw you" to you is not calling you a name. And the
    response had nothing to do with any kind of advocacy.

    >
    >>> Yes, MINE. Mine and local. This way I can continue to function even if
    >>> the "cloud" or internet access goes down. And this is a HUGE advantage
    >>> over having to rely 100% on internet and some cloud in order to get
    >>> work done.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> You do understand that business has been "outsourcing" file storage
    >> for years, don't you? File storage has been outsourced for years. This
    >> is just the next logical step. "The network is the computer" is
    >> starting to happen. With all change there are the "Chicken Little"
    >> types. The sky is always falling for them.

    >
    > Bull****. Name these businesses that outsource "file storage" because
    > you are once again clueless. Why do they outsource file storage??? Is it
    > because hard drives are so damn expensive?


    Your position is that business do not out source file storage?

    >
    > Let's see the list of companies that outsource storage or let's see a
    > list of companies that make their living selling "file storage" to
    > customers.


    Your position is that business do not out source file storage?

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of
    >>>>>>> the general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud,
    >>>>>>> according to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's
    >>>>>>> MobileMe service proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage
    >>>>>>> gird suffered substantial problems. "These growing pains, which
    >>>>>>> are more evident each day that we rely more on service-based
    >>>>>>> software efforts, indicate that you can't really trust the cloud
    >>>>>>> at this juncture. It's too early and providers are learning as
    >>>>>>> they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the
    >>>>>>> reality is that companies -- even very small companies -- need
    >>>>>>> redundant systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's
    >>>>>>> Gmail and GTalk service, our operations came to a standstill this
    >>>>>>> afternoon," blogger Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large
    >>>>>>> company, but the losses are very real, especially in
    >>>>>>> productivity."

    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues
    >>>>>>> involved with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be
    >>>>>>> feasible to host all of your internal documents, specs and
    >>>>>>> communications with Google or Yahoo or whoever. I know where I
    >>>>>>> work there's no way we would ever trust any 3rd party with our
    >>>>>>> data.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix
    >>>>>>> of outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and
    >>>>>>> this cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of
    >>>>>>> skepticism.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet
    >>>>>>>> access. I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?" (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Rick
    >>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>> --
    >>>> Rick
    >>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    >
    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **



    --
    Rick

  11. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing


    "Rick" wrote in message
    news:ZKOdnVff98ysuj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 14:18:41 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >> "Rick" wrote in message
    >> news:ZKOdnVrf98wqvj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:51:36 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>> news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>>>>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>>>>>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes ago
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday afternoon,
    >>>>>>>>>> with many
    >>>>>>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The company
    >>>>>>>>>> confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its Gmail blog.
    >>>>>>>>>> Titled "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the blog post said
    >>>>>>>>>> the problem was caused by a "temporary outage in our contacts
    >>>>>>>>>> system that was preventing Gmail from loading properly."
    >>>>>>>>>>

    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for
    >>>>>>>>> awhile due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm
    >>>>>>>> thinking of.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how viable
    >>>>>>>> it really is.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for
    >>>>>>> local computing and it's viability.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to
    >>>>>> access the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that
    >>>>>> works.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>>
    >>>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >>>> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >>>> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code.
    >>>> I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be
    >>>> able to send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my
    >>>> work without web access.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage +
    >>>>>> cloud outage = Multiple potential points of failure.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>>
    >>>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access the
    >>>> net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my documents,
    >>>> contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and compile code.
    >>>> I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work. I might not be
    >>>> able to send email or access the web but I can still do 80-90% of my
    >>>> work without web access.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then they
    >>>>>> can keep running with a power failure. But if their data is local
    >>>>>> then a power failure shuts them down?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage. That
    >>>>> is your incorrect inference.
    >>>>
    >>>> And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the
    >>>> cloud goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and
    >>>> information stored locally an outage has less impact since lots of
    >>>> work can still be done locally.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a
    >>>>>> long term power failure but short term outages are avoided.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.
    >>>>
    >>>> Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by
    >>>> accident.
    >>>
    >>> Screw you.

    >>
    >> Ahhh yes. When confonted with facts that Rick can't refute he acts like
    >> a 5th grade child, calls people names then runs away. Well done
    >> "advocate", well done.
    >>

    >
    > So, you allowed to insult me with: "Glad to hear that you finally "get it"
    > - even if it's by accident." without any response? You really should learn
    > English. Saying "screw you" to you is not calling you a name. And the
    > response had nothing to do with any kind of advocacy.


    Taking your whining elsewhere.


    >>
    >>>> Yes, MINE. Mine and local. This way I can continue to function even if
    >>>> the "cloud" or internet access goes down. And this is a HUGE advantage
    >>>> over having to rely 100% on internet and some cloud in order to get
    >>>> work done.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> You do understand that business has been "outsourcing" file storage
    >>> for years, don't you? File storage has been outsourced for years. This
    >>> is just the next logical step. "The network is the computer" is
    >>> starting to happen. With all change there are the "Chicken Little"
    >>> types. The sky is always falling for them.

    >>
    >> Bull****. Name these businesses that outsource "file storage" because
    >> you are once again clueless. Why do they outsource file storage??? Is it
    >> because hard drives are so damn expensive?

    >
    > Your position is that business do not out source file storage?


    It's a big world and saying that nobody does this would certainly be
    incorrect. A few, very few, companies outsource their primary storage.
    Companies prefer to keep their own data in-house. Typically what gets
    outsourced is storage for off-site backups. It's "backup data" that's stored
    off-site and even this is done for a small minority of companies. Your
    statement implies that it's routine for many companies to keep their primary
    data (documents, source code, product plans, etc) off-site on someone elses
    network which is not true.


    >>
    >> Let's see the list of companies that outsource storage or let's see a
    >> list of companies that make their living selling "file storage" to
    >> customers.

    >
    > Your position is that business do not out source file storage?


    I heard you the first time. Is there a reason why you usually repeat the
    same stupid question more than once?


    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Here's a quote from the article:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The outage is an indictment not just of Google's services but of
    >>>>>>>> the general proposition that businesses can rely on the cloud,
    >>>>>>>> according to blogger Larry Dignan. In recent weeks, Apple's
    >>>>>>>> MobileMe service proved to be a disaster and Amazon's S3 storage
    >>>>>>>> gird suffered substantial problems. "These growing pains, which
    >>>>>>>> are more evident each day that we rely more on service-based
    >>>>>>>> software efforts, indicate that you can't really trust the cloud
    >>>>>>>> at this juncture. It's too early and providers are learning as
    >>>>>>>> they go," Dignan wrote.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> While the idea of outsourcing IT to Google is appealing, the
    >>>>>>>> reality is that companies -- even very small companies -- need
    >>>>>>>> redundant systems. "Given that our company relies on Google's
    >>>>>>>> Gmail and GTalk service, our operations came to a standstill this
    >>>>>>>> afternoon," blogger Om Malik wrote on his site. "We aren't a large
    >>>>>>>> company, but the losses are very real, especially in
    >>>>>>>> productivity."

    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There are already massive security and confidentiality issues
    >>>>>>>> involved with cloud computing. Where you work, would it be
    >>>>>>>> feasible to host all of your internal documents, specs and
    >>>>>>>> communications with Google or Yahoo or whoever. I know where I
    >>>>>>>> work there's no way we would ever trust any 3rd party with our
    >>>>>>>> data.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The confidentiality/security issue is a major one. Throw in a mix
    >>>>>>>> of outages that will bring your entire organization to a halt and
    >>>>>>>> this cloud needs to be looked at with a healthy dose of
    >>>>>>>> skepticism.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>> "Even more amazing was the realization that God has Internet
    >>>>>>>>> access. I wonder if He has a full newsfeed?" (By Matt Welsh)
    >>>>>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>> Rick
    >>>>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Rick
    >>>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Rick

    >>
    >>
    >> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  12. Re: Major Gmail Outage Raises Big Doubts About Cloud Computing

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 14:36:23 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > "Rick" wrote in message
    > news:ZKOdnVff98ysuj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 14:18:41 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>> news:ZKOdnVrf98wqvj7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:51:36 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>>> news:ZKOdnVvf98x-gT7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:35:34 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Rick" wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:ZKOdnVnf98yjhD7VnZ2dnUVZ_g-dnZ2d@supernews.com...
    >>>>>>>> On Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:09:47 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>> news:qPjok.8646$XT1.5379@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>>>>>>>>>* Ezekiel peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> http://news.yahoo.com/s/nf/20080812/
    >>>>>>>> tc_nf/61274;_ylt=AuVXO2ThSGtcOf6etPF.s0YjtBAF
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> Gmail Outage Raises Doubts About Cloud Computing 41 minutes
    >>>>>>>>>>> ago
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> Google's Gmail service suffered a major outage Monday
    >>>>>>>>>>> afternoon, with many
    >>>>>>>>>>> users locked out of their e-mail for several hours. The
    >>>>>>>>>>> company confirmed the outage in an unusual apology on its
    >>>>>>>>>>> Gmail blog. Titled "We feel your pain and we're sorry," the
    >>>>>>>>>>> blog post said the problem was caused by a "temporary outage
    >>>>>>>>>>> in our contacts system that was preventing Gmail from loading
    >>>>>>>>>>> properly."

    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Some time ago, didn't Google also disappear from the 'net for
    >>>>>>>>>> awhile due to a DNS misconfiguration?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Yes it did... about a year ago if it's the incident that I'm
    >>>>>>>>> thinking of.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> This further raises doubts about 'cloud computing' and how
    >>>>>>>>> viable it really is.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I suppose you electricity utility never has outages? So much for
    >>>>>>>> local computing and it's viability.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> So if the power goes out then they'll still somehow be able to
    >>>>>>> access the "cloud" and get their remote data? Do explain how that
    >>>>>>> works.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access
    >>>>> the net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my
    >>>>> documents, contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and
    >>>>> compile code. I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work.
    >>>>> I might not be able to send email or access the web but I can still
    >>>>> do 80-90% of my work without web access.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Power outage = Single potential point of failure. Power outage +
    >>>>>>> cloud outage = Multiple potential points of failure.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So, if power goes out, you can access the Net?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That's the point Rick... if power goes out I don't have to access
    >>>>> the net. As long as my computer has a UPS I can still access my
    >>>>> documents, contacts, phone-numbers and run local applications and
    >>>>> compile code. I'm not 100% reliant on the net to do all of my work.
    >>>>> I might not be able to send email or access the web but I can still
    >>>>> do 80-90% of my work without web access.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Somehow you think that because they use "cloud computing" then
    >>>>>>> they can keep running with a power failure. But if their data is
    >>>>>>> local then a power failure shuts them down?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> No, I don't think they can access the net during a power outage.
    >>>>>> That is your incorrect inference.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> And with "cloud computing" when either internet access, power or the
    >>>>> cloud goes down the entire company is crippled. With data and
    >>>>> information stored locally an outage has less impact since lots of
    >>>>> work can still be done locally.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Also - Critical systems typically have a UPS. Doesn't help for a
    >>>>>>> long term power failure but short term outages are avoided.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> YOUR computer. YOURS. Local.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Good. Glad to hear that you finally "get it" - even if it's by
    >>>>> accident.
    >>>>
    >>>> Screw you.
    >>>
    >>> Ahhh yes. When confonted with facts that Rick can't refute he acts
    >>> like a 5th grade child, calls people names then runs away. Well done
    >>> "advocate", well done.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> So, you allowed to insult me with: "Glad to hear that you finally "get
    >> it" - even if it's by accident." without any response? You really
    >> should learn English. Saying "screw you" to you is not calling you a
    >> name. And the response had nothing to do with any kind of advocacy.

    >
    > Taking your whining elsewhere.
    >


    Screw you.
    (snip)

    --
    Rick

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