School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils. - Linux

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  1. School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    Hi all.

    For the past week, I have been reading and watching news about the
    Portuguese governments plan to put a laptop in each school children's
    hands.

    It is a hot topic right now in Portugal. The government has been under fire
    about some of their policies so this project, that has been in the works
    since 2006, comes at a great time for government.

    It is going to be the biggest change in the teaching system since the
    printing press was popularized. If it's for better or worse time will tell.
    Are school books on their way to the History web sites?

    Each child when entering school in September will get one. It will cost 50€
    for most children but will be free for children of low income families
    (about 15%). It will have Internet access in the schools.

    For the older students there is already help from the government where you
    get a "normal" laptop (various models and brands available) for 150€ plus
    3G (7 Mbps) Internet access for around 30€ per month.

    Intel got the deal because the laptops are going to be produced in part in
    Portugal. OLPC can't compete with that even if OLPC's offer is technically
    better and a bit cheaper. Any way, it is due to OLPC that the Magalhaes
    (the laptop's name, Magellan in english) and many of those small cheap
    laptops exist. They opened the door, the others rushed in not to loose the
    oportunity. That in it self makes the OLPC project an accomplishment and a
    success.

    Magalhaes users will have a choice of Windows XP or Linux. Windows XP and
    Linux are the OSs currently used in the basic education system so there is
    already tech support present. Presently, MacOS X, *BSD, Vista and all
    others are almost non existent, making these OSs very problematic to get
    support for.

    A bunch of software (e.g. Firefox, OpenOffice, GIMP and lots of educational
    software), most of it FOSS, is also included and is the same for both OSs,
    making the application support a non issue in the OS of choice.

    At first I thought that Windows XP would dominate but I'm hearing that most
    schools will recommend Linux to their students to increase security and
    reduce maintenance and administrative work.

    Any way, both OSs are trivial to install and come already fully configured.
    Don't know if they always come with both OSs or Windows XP only comes if
    requested/paid. Half a million Windows XP licenses have a cost that is not
    irrelevant.

    It will be very interesting to see the results of this policy.

    I have searched for similar "one laptop per school children" deployments
    projects but found none. There are larger deployments of computers (e.g.
    Brasil) but those are not for a exclusive computer per child and that
    exclusivity makes a big difference.

    Do you have any examples of similar deployments? I would like to hear about
    it, especially if you have personal experience. How was the learning
    process and children's problem solving changed? How have the teachers
    adapted?

    Regards

  2. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.

    On Jul 30, 6:24*pm, LusoTec wrote:
    > Hi all.
    >
    > For the past week, I have been reading and watching news about the
    > Portuguese governments plan to put a laptop in each school children's
    > hands.
    >
    > It is a hot topic right now in Portugal. The government has been under fire
    > about some of their policies so this project, that has been in the works
    > since 2006, comes at a great time for government.
    >
    > It is going to be the biggest change in the teaching system since the
    > printing press was popularized. If it's for better or worse time will tell.
    > Are school books on their way to the History web sites?
    >
    > Each child when entering school in September will get one. It will cost 50
    > for most children but will be free for children of low income families
    > (about 15%). It will have Internet access in the schools.
    >
    > For the older students there is already help from the government where you
    > get a "normal" laptop (various models and brands available) for 150 plus
    > 3G (7 Mbps) Internet access for around 30 per month.
    >
    > Intel got the deal because the laptops are going to be produced in part in
    > Portugal. OLPC can't compete with that even if OLPC's offer is technically
    > better and a bit cheaper. Any way, it is due to OLPC that the Magalhaes
    > (the laptop's name, Magellan in english) and many of those small cheap
    > laptops exist. They opened the door, the others rushed in not to loose the
    > oportunity. That in it self makes the OLPC project an accomplishment and a
    > success.
    >
    > Magalhaes users will have a choice of Windows XP or Linux. Windows XP and
    > Linux are the OSs currently used in the basic education system so there is
    > already tech support present. Presently, MacOS X, *BSD, Vista and all
    > others are almost non existent, making these OSs very problematic to get
    > support for.
    >
    > A bunch of software (e.g. Firefox, OpenOffice, GIMP and lots of educational
    > software), most of it FOSS, is also included and is the same for both OSs,
    > making the application support a non issue in the OS of choice.
    >
    > At first I thought that Windows XP would dominate but I'm hearing that most
    > schools will recommend Linux to their students to increase security and
    > reduce maintenance and administrative work.
    >
    > Any way, both OSs are trivial to install and come already fully configured.
    > Don't know if they always come with both OSs or Windows XP only comes if
    > requested/paid. Half a million Windows XP licenses have a cost that is not
    > irrelevant.
    >
    > It will be very interesting to see the results of this policy.
    >
    > I have searched for similar "one laptop per school children" deployments
    > projects but found none. There are larger deployments of computers (e.g.
    > Brasil) but those are not for a exclusive computer per child and that
    > exclusivity makes a big difference.
    >
    > Do you have any examples of similar deployments? I would like to hear about
    > it, especially if you have personal experience. How was the learning
    > process and children's problem solving changed? How have the teachers
    > adapted?
    >
    > Regards


    From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop.
    Not any linux distro. And SUGAR is slow on the laptop.
    Windows seems much faster.


  3. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    Hi Psyc.

    Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop.
    > Not any linux distro. And SUGAR is slow on the laptop.
    > Windows seems much faster.


    The Magalhaes laptop has a Intel Atom 1.6 GHz CPU, 1GB of RAM and a 30GB
    hard drive. It is more than enough for Linux even with a heavy duty WM (or
    Windows XP) with OpenOffice, Firefox, GIMP and several more programs all
    running at once.

    Note that I never used a Magalhaes laptop so I'm using an educated guess
    from my use of both OSs since I have worked on both OSs in hardware with
    much less power.

    Most computers in Portuguese basic education schools aren't much better and
    probably are worse any way. Until now, IT in these schools was far from
    being a priority.

    The only difference (from the user's perpective) I see between the two OSs
    (apart from the price) is that a security in windows xp requires a much
    greater care from the user.

    Lets remember that we are talking about children from 6 to 10 years of age.
    Telling children of these ages to keep their curiosity under control
    ("uh!!! what does this program/button do?!" ) is a lost battle from the
    start.

    Regards.

    p.s. These laptops have 6 hours of battery charge. Not bad.

  4. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, LusoTec

    wrote
    on Thu, 31 Jul 2008 00:18:35 +0100
    :
    > Hi Psyc.
    >
    > Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >> From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop.
    >> Not any linux distro. And SUGAR is slow on the laptop.
    >> Windows seems much faster.

    >
    > The Magalhaes laptop has a Intel Atom 1.6 GHz CPU, 1GB of RAM and a 30GB
    > hard drive. It is more than enough for Linux even with a heavy duty WM (or
    > Windows XP) with OpenOffice, Firefox, GIMP and several more programs all
    > running at once.


    The CPU's a little slow, but does sound on par with my
    laptop, and that's enough heft for OO, certainly.

    >
    > Note that I never used a Magalhaes laptop so I'm using an educated guess
    > from my use of both OSs since I have worked on both OSs in hardware with
    > much less power.
    >
    > Most computers in Portuguese basic education schools aren't much better and
    > probably are worse any way. Until now, IT in these schools was far from
    > being a priority.
    >
    > The only difference (from the user's perpective) I see between the two OSs
    > (apart from the price) is that a security in windows xp requires a much
    > greater care from the user.


    And probably a fair amount of work from IT when something gets in.

    >
    > Lets remember that we are talking about children from 6 to 10 years of age.


    Not sure they'll do a lot with OO, though simple papers are presumably
    possible.

    > Telling children of these ages to keep their curiosity under control
    > ("uh!!! what does this program/button do?!" ) is a lost battle from the
    > start.


    Oh yeah. ;-)

    >
    > Regards.
    >
    > p.s. These laptops have 6 hours of battery charge. Not bad.


    OLPC might have better (8 to 11), but one takes what one can. ;-)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Insert random misquote here.
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    Hi.

    The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    > The CPU's a little slow, but does sound on par with my
    > laptop, and that's enough heft for OO, certainly.


    I don't know, OO spell checker is going to have a lot of work.

    >> The only difference (from the user's perpective) I see between the two
    >> OSs (apart from the price) is that a security in windows xp requires a
    >> much greater care from the user.

    >
    > And probably a fair amount of work from IT when something gets in.


    500000 laptops in the hands of kids!!

    Even if each laptop only requires 3 support requests per year (which is a
    very good scenario) that would be 1500000 calls per year (240 work days) or
    about 6250 support request per work day. If each support request takes on
    average 20 minutes to resolve and each support technician works 8 hours per
    work day then 260 technician will be required to keep the laptops running.

    Good security and locked down configuration are Linux strong points that
    help reduce support expenses. Windows XP wins in higher familiarity among
    the teachers that can resolve some of the support request and reduce those
    that actually reach the technicians.

    >> Lets remember that we are talking about children from 6 to 10 years of
    >> age.

    >
    > Not sure they'll do a lot with OO, though simple papers are presumably
    > possible.


    From my personal experience, a spell checker is a great tool when learning
    to write foreign languages (or in this case native), it gives immediate
    feed back and a more productive learning.

    >> Telling children of these ages to keep their curiosity under control
    >> ("uh!!! what does this program/button do?!" ) is a lost battle from
    >> the start.

    >
    > Oh yeah. ;-)


    And lets not even think on the "where did you put the laptop? ... (raise
    shoulders/start crying)".

    >> p.s. These laptops have 6 hours of battery charge. Not bad.

    >
    > OLPC might have better (8 to 11), but one takes what one can. ;-)


    "one takes what one can" ... so true.

    Regards.

  6. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.

    On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 15:35:49 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    > On Jul 30, 6:24*pm, LusoTec wrote:
    >> Hi all.
    >>
    >> For the past week, I have been reading and watching news about the
    >> Portuguese governments plan to put a laptop in each school children's
    >> hands.
    >>
    >> It is a hot topic right now in Portugal. The government has been under
    >> fire about some of their policies so this project, that has been in the
    >> works since 2006, comes at a great time for government.
    >>
    >> It is going to be the biggest change in the teaching system since the
    >> printing press was popularized. If it's for better or worse time will
    >> tell. Are school books on their way to the History web sites?
    >>
    >> Each child when entering school in September will get one. It will cost
    >> 50€ for most children but will be free for children of low income
    >> families (about 15%). It will have Internet access in the schools.
    >>
    >> For the older students there is already help from the government where
    >> you get a "normal" laptop (various models and brands available) for
    >> 150€ plus 3G (7 Mbps) Internet access for around 30€ per month.
    >>
    >> Intel got the deal because the laptops are going to be produced in part
    >> in Portugal. OLPC can't compete with that even if OLPC's offer is
    >> technically better and a bit cheaper. Any way, it is due to OLPC that
    >> the Magalhaes (the laptop's name, Magellan in english) and many of
    >> those small cheap laptops exist. They opened the door, the others
    >> rushed in not to loose the oportunity. That in it self makes the OLPC
    >> project an accomplishment and a success.
    >>
    >> Magalhaes users will have a choice of Windows XP or Linux. Windows XP
    >> and Linux are the OSs currently used in the basic education system so
    >> there is already tech support present. Presently, MacOS X, *BSD, Vista
    >> and all others are almost non existent, making these OSs very
    >> problematic to get support for.
    >>
    >> A bunch of software (e.g. Firefox, OpenOffice, GIMP and lots of
    >> educational software), most of it FOSS, is also included and is the
    >> same for both OSs, making the application support a non issue in the OS
    >> of choice.
    >>
    >> At first I thought that Windows XP would dominate but I'm hearing that
    >> most schools will recommend Linux to their students to increase
    >> security and reduce maintenance and administrative work.
    >>
    >> Any way, both OSs are trivial to install and come already fully
    >> configured. Don't know if they always come with both OSs or Windows XP
    >> only comes if requested/paid. Half a million Windows XP licenses have a
    >> cost that is not irrelevant.
    >>
    >> It will be very interesting to see the results of this policy.
    >>
    >> I have searched for similar "one laptop per school children"
    >> deployments projects but found none. There are larger deployments of
    >> computers (e.g. Brasil) but those are not for a exclusive computer per
    >> child and that exclusivity makes a big difference.
    >>
    >> Do you have any examples of similar deployments? I would like to hear
    >> about it, especially if you have personal experience. How was the
    >> learning process and children's problem solving changed? How have the
    >> teachers adapted?
    >>
    >> Regards

    >
    > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any linux
    > distro. And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much faster.



    And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No? I
    didn't think so.


    --
    Rick

  7. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 23:24:31 +0100, LusoTec wrote:

    > Hi all.
    >
    > For the past week, I have been reading and watching news about the
    > Portuguese governments plan to put a laptop in each school children's
    > hands.


    snip-------

    > Do you have any examples of similar deployments? I would like to hear about
    > it, especially if you have personal experience. How was the learning
    > process and children's problem solving changed? How have the teachers
    > adapted?
    >
    > Regards


    I think it's a great idea!

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  8. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    In article ,
    LusoTec wrote:
    > Magalhaes users will have a choice of Windows XP or Linux. Windows XP and
    > Linux are the OSs currently used in the basic education system so there is
    > already tech support present. Presently, MacOS X, *BSD, Vista and all

    ....
    > At first I thought that Windows XP would dominate but I'm hearing that most
    > schools will recommend Linux to their students to increase security and
    > reduce maintenance and administrative work.


    According to an article about this project on Arstechnica, one of the
    big reasons they went with a design based on the Classmate reference,
    rather than on OLPC, is that OLPC uses too much unfamiliar technology,
    for both hardware and software.

    The OLPC project has tried to address these concerns by making XP
    available for OLPC, but then a significant chunk of its backers among
    the free software crowd stopped caring about OLPC. The lesson there is
    that when you are trying to help kids with a community supported effort,
    you should really draw your support from a community that actually cares
    about kids. The free software OLPC supporters mostly just cared about
    the technology, and so when it ceased to be interesting, they lost
    interest.

    ....
    > I have searched for similar "one laptop per school children" deployments
    > projects but found none. There are larger deployments of computers (e.g.
    > Brasil) but those are not for a exclusive computer per child and that
    > exclusivity makes a big difference.


    The Portuguese Classmate project is just slightly smaller than the total
    size of *all* OLPC projects everywhere, so you aren't going to find
    anything really comparable.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  9. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    Tim Smith wrote:
    > According to an article about this project on Arstechnica, one of the
    > big reasons they went with a design based on the Classmate reference,
    > rather than on OLPC, is that OLPC uses too much unfamiliar technology,
    > for both hardware and software.
    >
    > The OLPC project has tried to address these concerns by making XP
    > available for OLPC, but then a significant chunk of its backers among
    > the free software crowd stopped caring about OLPC. The lesson there is
    > that when you are trying to help kids with a community supported effort,
    > you should really draw your support from a community that actually cares
    > about kids. The free software OLPC supporters mostly just cared about
    > the technology, and so when it ceased to be interesting, they lost
    > interest.


    Please provide a link to the article?

    I found this article [1] in Arstechnica about this subject but it does not
    refer explicitly the reason for the government's choice.
    [1]http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080730-portugals-500k-classmate-pc-order-a-nail-in-olpc-coffin.html

    What I heard was that the local production was the card that gave Intel the
    victory. Local production has obvious economic advantages since most of the
    production will be exported and maintenance is facilitated. Also the
    production is placed on a economically depressed village that will get a
    significant boost with this project.

    The XO hardware is more "cutting edge" than the Magalhaes but it has been
    tried and tested (more than the Magalhaes in fact) so I don't see it as a
    reason against, just the opposite. Has for the XO software, most of it is
    standard desktop software and the only unfamiliar software is the custom
    shell and that can easily be replaced with a more standard one.

    [speculation] One factor that may have contributed to Intel's classmate
    being the choice may have been Intel's size. It is easier to select a
    project that has a large company backing it. It gives a *sense* of
    security.

    >> I have searched for similar "one laptop per school children" deployments
    >> projects but found none. There are larger deployments of computers (e.g.
    >> Brasil) but those are not for a exclusive computer per child and that
    >> exclusivity makes a big difference.

    >
    > The Portuguese Classmate project is just slightly smaller than the total
    > size of *all* OLPC projects everywhere, so you aren't going to find
    > anything really comparable.


    And from what I have read, in most of the XO and classmate deployments, the
    kids don't have their *personal* laptop, instead the laptop are used as a
    teaching tool in class and they stay there. It is interesting in the
    education front but does not exactly make that social and educational
    change that a *personal* laptop in the hands of every children potentially
    can do.

    Brasil has done a great effort to provide access to computers in the
    schools. It is probably leading the computer per students world wide but
    that is not the same as each child having her own laptop, making (part of)
    their home work on it, communicating from home with their colleges and
    teachers, organizing their personal information on it, researching a world
    of information on it, making it second nature to use a computer.

    The education potential is enormous. Imagine math problems being corrected
    and explained to the children automatically and with infinite patience.
    Imagine a voice recognition, dictionary/encyclopedia with lots of images,
    videos and pronunciation program helping children to learn to read. Imagine
    a spell and grammar checker program helping children to write. Imagine
    learning history by watching videos of recent historical events, historical
    reconstitutions, large quantities of relevant images, 3D virtual
    reconstructions of ruins (like a 3D game). Imagine learning geography by
    looking at a virtual globe interactively showing, population densities,
    migration patterns, age distributions, economical information, etc, etc,
    etc. Imagine learning anatomy from 3D virtual models. Imagine learning
    chemistry by looking at 3D representation of molecules and how they
    interact/react. A great future in education is close at hand (I hope).

    Are there potential down sides?! Certainly. Computers have a world of
    information inside but they are not the world. It is important to not let
    human relations be mediated by a computer. It is important to not let the
    computer be the only source of information the children know how to use. It
    is important to teach children to solve problem independently of the
    computer. It is important to teach children to write with pen and paper. It
    is important to teach children to have critical thinking (especially on the
    Internet )...

    I'm watching this project with great interest!

    Regards.

  10. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.


    > > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any linux
    > > distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much faster.

    >
    > And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No? I
    > didn't think so.
    >
    > --
    > Rick


    Actually, it came from an OLPC article.
    You should try googling and reading once in a while.
    You should be good at it.
    You say you run linux.




  11. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.

    On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 06:37:17 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    >> > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any linux
    >> > distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much faster.

    >>
    >> And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No? I
    >> didn't think so.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    > Actually, it came from an OLPC article. You should try googling and
    > reading once in a while. You should be good at it.
    > You say you run linux.


    How about a link. I'd like to read it for myself.


    --
    Rick

  12. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 06:37:17 -0700 (PDT), Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    >>> From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any linux
    >>> distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much faster.

    >>
    >> And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No? I
    >> didn't think so.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    > Actually, it came from an OLPC article.
    > You should try googling and reading once in a while.
    > You should be good at it.
    > You say you run linux.


    Profile shows that *LusoTec* likes to post in rec.motorcycles......

    Hmmmm.... I wonder who that could be....

    http://groups.google.com/groups/prof...0y4Pue0pYgAOJQ
    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  13. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.

    On Jul 31, 9:48*am, Rick wrote:
    > On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 06:37:17 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    > >> > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any linux
    > >> > distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much faster.

    >
    > >> And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No? I
    > >> didn't think so.

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Rick

    >
    > > Actually, it came from an OLPC article. You should try googling and
    > > reading once in a while. You should be good at it.
    > > You say you run linux.

    >
    > How about a link. I'd like to read it for myself.
    >
    > --
    > Rick


    google ... like there are a million articles on this.
    do your own research, and fix your web site.

  14. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    In article ,
    LusoTec wrote:
    > Please provide a link to the article?
    >
    > I found this article [1] in Arstechnica about this subject but it does not
    > refer explicitly the reason for the government's choice.
    > [1]http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080730-portugals-500k-classmate-pc-o
    > rder-a-nail-in-olpc-coffin.html


    You are right. It just mentions that governments in general were swayed
    by the Classmate's more familiar technology. It doesn't say how much a
    factor that was in Portugal's decision.


    --
    --Tim Smith

  15. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books andpencils.

    On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 08:49:52 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    > On Jul 31, 9:48*am, Rick wrote:
    >> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 06:37:17 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >> >> > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any
    >> >> > linux distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much
    >> >> > faster.

    >>
    >> >> And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No?
    >> >> I didn't think so.

    >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Rick

    >>
    >> > Actually, it came from an OLPC article. You should try googling and
    >> > reading once in a while. You should be good at it. You say you run
    >> > linux.

    >>
    >> How about a link. I'd like to read it for myself.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    > google ... like there are a million articles on this. do your own
    > research, and fix your web site.



    I have to assume there is no link, and you are blowin' smoke.


    --
    Rick

  16. Re: School children get laptop "Magalhaes" along with books and pencils.

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Rick

    wrote
    on Thu, 31 Jul 2008 15:47:31 -0500
    :
    > On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 08:49:52 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >
    >> On Jul 31, 9:48*am, Rick wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 06:37:17 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >>> >> > From what I read, they have to run SUGAR on the laptop. Not any
    >>> >> > linux distro. *And SUGAR is slow on the laptop. Windows seems much
    >>> >> > faster.
    >>>
    >>> >> And you have come tho that conclusion by running your own tests? No?
    >>> >> I didn't think so.
    >>>
    >>> >> --
    >>> >> Rick
    >>>
    >>> > Actually, it came from an OLPC article. You should try googling and
    >>> > reading once in a while. You should be good at it. You say you run
    >>> > linux.
    >>>
    >>> How about a link. I'd like to read it for myself.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Rick

    >>
    >> google ... like there are a million articles on this. do your own
    >> research, and fix your web site.

    >
    >
    > I have to assume there is no link, and you are blowin' smoke.
    >


    Well, a little Googling on OLPC SUGAR did cough up this drop:

    http://www.osnews.com/story/16582/Th...ce:_Dont_Do_it

    This is a somewhat dated (2006) opinion piece from Thom
    Holwerda, which suggests that the kids would be better
    off learning Windows than the untested Sugar interface.

    No commentary on the actual speed of the interface, though.

    http://www.engadget.com/photos/olpc-...-tour-gallery/

    shows a tour of the interface, which to me looks way too
    simplistic, though to be fair, children aren't going to
    be that interested in subtleties.

    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000762.html

    shows the main screen in a classwork environment,
    presumably -- a slightly more realistic example -- as well
    as a more positive commentary on the actual interface; this
    is a significant (though in some respects not that radical)
    departure from the standard "window-text-icon-clicky"
    interface we're all more or less used to in a GUI.

    For those sufficiently adventurous, one might try

    http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Emulating_...ck_Start/Linux

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
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