Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past - Linux

This is a discussion on Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past - Linux ; Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen. So I googled. And i came across scrot. What is scrot? http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...-cli-with.html A command line screen capture tool. It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that right. I must be ...

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Thread: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

  1. Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen.
    So I googled. And i came across scrot.
    What is scrot?

    http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...-cli-with.html

    A command line screen capture tool.
    It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that
    right. I must be in the 60's still. You have to
    terminal and install and even run it.

    It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen
    for this tool? Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.

    The screen capture includes the terminal window.

    Can't I just just the mouse and select the area?
    Or do I need to keep google-ing to find another program.



  2. Re: clueless TAB.

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    > Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen. So I googled. And i came
    > across scrot. What is scrot?
    >
    > http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-

    cli-with.html
    >
    > A command line screen capture tool.
    > It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that right. I must be in the 60's
    > still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.
    >
    > It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen for this tool?
    > Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.


    Make a screen for this? Oh, I forgot. You are brain damaged. Scrot is a
    commandline tool. gnome-screenshot is the name of the GUI based tool,
    Take Screenshot is the menu item.

    >
    > The screen capture includes the terminal window.
    >
    > Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    > google-ing to find another program.



    Applications -> Accessories -> Take Screenshot ...

    Whole desktop or active window.

    -IF- you have KDE installed, there is ksnapshot.


    --
    Rick

  3. Re: clueless TAB.

    On Jul 29, 2:47*pm, Rick wrote:
    > On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    > > Yep, I had to capture a part *of a screen. So I googled. *And i came
    > > across scrot. What is scrot?

    >
    > >http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-

    > cli-with.html
    >
    > > A command line screen capture tool.
    > > It is all TERMINAL BASED. *You got that right. *I must be in the 60's
    > > still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.

    >
    > > It has a lot of options. *They can't make a screen for this tool?
    > > Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.

    >
    > Make a screen for this? Oh, I forgot. You are brain damaged. Scrot is a
    > commandline tool. gnome-screenshot is the name of the GUI based tool,
    > Take Screenshot is the menu item.
    >
    >
    >
    > > The screen capture includes the terminal window.

    >
    > > Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    > > google-ing to find another program.

    >
    > Applications -> Accessories -> Take Screenshot ...
    >
    > Whole desktop or active window.
    >
    > -IF- you have KDE installed, there is ksnapshot.
    >
    > --
    > Rick


    That works....

  4. Linux Screenshots

    On Jul 29, 3:08*pm, "Psyc Geek (TAB)" wrote:
    > On Jul 29, 2:47*pm, Rick wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    > > > Yep, I had to capture a part *of a screen. So I googled. *And i came
    > > > across scrot. What is scrot?

    >
    > > >http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-

    > > cli-with.html

    >
    > > > A command line screen capture tool.
    > > > It is all TERMINAL BASED. *You got that right. *I must be in the 60's
    > > > still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.

    >
    > > > It has a lot of options. *They can't make a screen for this tool?
    > > > Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.

    >
    > > Make a screen for this? Oh, I forgot. You are brain damaged. Scrot is a
    > > commandline tool. gnome-screenshot is the name of the GUI based tool,
    > > Take Screenshot is the menu item.

    >
    > > > The screen capture includes the terminal window.

    >
    > > > Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    > > > google-ing to find another program.

    >
    > > Applications -> Accessories -> Take Screenshot ...

    >
    > > Whole desktop or active window.

    >
    > > -IF- you have KDE installed, there is ksnapshot.

    >
    > > --
    > > Rick

    >
    > That works....


    Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    SCREENSHOT.
    That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.

    I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    Linux. No thought into design.

  5. Re: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700 (PDT), Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    > Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen.
    > So I googled. And i came across scrot.
    > What is scrot?
    >
    > http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...-cli-with.html
    >
    > A command line screen capture tool.
    > It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that
    > right. I must be in the 60's still. You have to
    > terminal and install and even run it.
    >
    > It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen
    > for this tool? Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.
    >
    > The screen capture includes the terminal window.
    >
    > Can't I just just the mouse and select the area?
    > Or do I need to keep google-ing to find another program.


    Scrot?

    You're kidding right?

    That's slang for "scrotum".....

    Coppers call homosexuals "Scrots" ....

    Yet another fantastic Linux name for a program....

    Not as good as LinPUS though... That one takes the cake..


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  6. Re: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    On 2008-07-29, Moshe Goldfarb. wrote:
    > On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700 (PDT), Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >
    >> Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen.
    >> So I googled. And i came across scrot.
    >> What is scrot?


    I am sorry that you did not come across Alt-PrintScreen.

    So you log on to your Ubuntu and press Alt-PrintScreen and you have
    your screen capture. It even prompts you for the file name to save it,
    how nice.

    This "scrot", I think is more for spying on your spouse with a cron
    job, to take screen picture every minute of some other special things
    like that.

    i

    >> http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...-cli-with.html
    >>
    >> A command line screen capture tool.
    >> It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that
    >> right. I must be in the 60's still. You have to
    >> terminal and install and even run it.
    >>
    >> It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen
    >> for this tool? Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.
    >>
    >> The screen capture includes the terminal window.
    >>
    >> Can't I just just the mouse and select the area?
    >> Or do I need to keep google-ing to find another program.

    >
    > Scrot?
    >
    > You're kidding right?
    >
    > That's slang for "scrotum".....
    >
    > Coppers call homosexuals "Scrots" ....
    >
    > Yet another fantastic Linux name for a program....
    >
    > Not as good as LinPUS though... That one takes the cake..
    >
    >


    --
    Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
    to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
    from Google Groups. If you want your postings to be seen by
    more readers you will need to find a different means of
    posting on Usenet.
    http://improve-usenet.org/

  7. Re: Linux Screenshots

    Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    > On Jul 29, 3:08 pm, "Psyc Geek (TAB)" wrote:
    >> On Jul 29, 2:47 pm, Rick wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >>>> Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen. So I googled. And i came
    >>>> across scrot. What is scrot?
    >>>> http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-
    >>> cli-with.html
    >>>> A command line screen capture tool.
    >>>> It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that right. I must be in the 60's
    >>>> still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.
    >>>> It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen for this tool?
    >>>> Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.
    >>> Make a screen for this? Oh, I forgot. You are brain damaged. Scrot is a
    >>> commandline tool. gnome-screenshot is the name of the GUI based tool,
    >>> Take Screenshot is the menu item.
    >>>> The screen capture includes the terminal window.
    >>>> Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    >>>> google-ing to find another program.
    >>> Applications -> Accessories -> Take Screenshot ...
    >>> Whole desktop or active window.
    >>> -IF- you have KDE installed, there is ksnapshot.
    >>> --
    >>> Rick

    >> That works....

    >
    > Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    > SCREENSHOT.
    > That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >
    > I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    > Linux. No thought into design.


    Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    print.

  8. Re: clueless TAB.

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 12:08:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:

    > On Jul 29, 2:47*pm, Rick wrote:
    >> On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700, Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >> > Yep, I had to capture a part *of a screen. So I googled. *And i came
    >> > across scrot. What is scrot?

    >>
    >> >http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-

    >> cli-with.html
    >>
    >> > A command line screen capture tool.
    >> > It is all TERMINAL BASED. *You got that right. *I must be in the 60's
    >> > still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.

    >>
    >> > It has a lot of options. *They can't make a screen for this tool?
    >> > Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.

    >>
    >> Make a screen for this? Oh, I forgot. You are brain damaged. Scrot is a
    >> commandline tool. gnome-screenshot is the name of the GUI based tool,
    >> Take Screenshot is the menu item.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > The screen capture includes the terminal window.

    >>
    >> > Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    >> > google-ing to find another program.

    >>
    >> Applications -> Accessories -> Take Screenshot ...
    >>
    >> Whole desktop or active window.
    >>
    >> -IF- you have KDE installed, there is ksnapshot.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick

    >
    > That works....


    No kidding.



    --
    Rick

  9. Re: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 15:24:36 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb. wrote:

    > On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0700 (PDT), Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >
    >> Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen. So I googled. And i came
    >> across scrot. What is scrot?
    >>
    >> http://onlyubuntu.blogspot.com/2008/...reenshots-via-

    cli-with.html
    >>
    >> A command line screen capture tool.
    >> It is all TERMINAL BASED. You got that right. I must be in the 60's
    >> still. You have to terminal and install and even run it.
    >>
    >> It has a lot of options. They can't make a screen for this tool?
    >> Right, the programmers are 60's geeks.
    >>
    >> The screen capture includes the terminal window.
    >>
    >> Can't I just just the mouse and select the area? Or do I need to keep
    >> google-ing to find another program.

    >
    > Scrot?
    >
    > You're kidding right?
    >
    > That's slang for "scrotum".....
    >
    > Coppers call homosexuals "Scrots" ....
    >
    > Yet another fantastic Linux name for a program....
    >
    > Not as good as LinPUS though... That one takes the cake..


    Why do you enjoy looking like such scum?



    --
    Rick

  10. Re: Linux Screenshots

    "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    7/29/08 12:33 PM:

    >> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >> SCREENSHOT.
    >> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>
    >> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >> Linux. No thought into design.

    >
    > Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    > all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    > they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    > print.


    Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    *Windows* way...


    --
    Computers are incredibly fast, accurate, and stupid: humans are incredibly
    slow, inaccurate and brilliant; together they are powerful beyond
    imagination. - attributed to Albert Einstein, likely apocryphal


  11. Re: Linux Screenshots

    Snit wrote:
    > "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    > 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >
    >>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>
    >>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>> Linux. No thought into design.

    >> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    >> all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    >> they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    >> print.

    >
    > Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    > cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    > key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    > *Windows* way...
    >
    >


    Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    the Windows way. =P

  12. Re: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    Rick wrote:
    > Why do you enjoy looking like such scum?


    Go easy on 'er.
    It's all she knows. No-one was ever nice to her as a kid so she thinks this
    is how all adults act.
    --
    | |What to do if you find yourself stuck in a crack|
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk |in the ground beneath a giant boulder, which you|
    | |can't move, with no hope of rescue. |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc |Consider how lucky you are that life has been |
    | in |good to you so far... |
    | Computer Science | -The BOOK, Hitch-hiker's guide to the galaxy.|

  13. Re: Linux Screenshots

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 21:08:48 +0100, Ben wrote:

    > Snit wrote:
    >> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net
    >> on 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>
    >>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>
    >>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not
    >>> like all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly
    >>> odd since they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was
    >>> already taken by print.

    >>
    >> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste
    >> and cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they
    >> used a key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has
    >> adopted the *Windows* way...
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    > the Windows way. =P


    Lisa way?



    --
    Rick

  14. Re: Linux Screenshots

    "Ben" stated in post g6ntcg$va1$1@news.mixmin.net on
    7/29/08 1:08 PM:

    > Snit wrote:
    >> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    >> 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>
    >>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>
    >>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    >>> all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    >>> they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    >>> print.

    >>
    >> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    >> cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    >> key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    >> *Windows* way...
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    > the Windows way. =P


    Well, Windows did it the "Mac" way but not as well... most Linux programs
    got it wrong in the same way Windows does... and if a few do not they would
    be inconsistent with the rest of the distro!


    --
    The fact that OS X is growing and Linux isn't, tells you that OS X is
    offering things that Linux is not.
    - Mark Shuttleworth (founded Canonical Ltd. / Ubuntu Linux)


  15. Re: Linux Screenshots

    "Rick" stated in post
    IuSdnV3Xyu3x5hLVnZ2dnUVZ_rvinZ2d@supernews.com on 7/29/08 1:19 PM:

    > On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 21:08:48 +0100, Ben wrote:
    >
    >> Snit wrote:
    >>> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net
    >>> on 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>>
    >>>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not
    >>>> like all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly
    >>>> odd since they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was
    >>>> already taken by print.
    >>>
    >>> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste
    >>> and cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they
    >>> used a key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has
    >>> adopted the *Windows* way...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    >> the Windows way. =P

    >
    > Lisa way?


    Apple IIe way... many of those short cuts were used by AppleWorks for the
    Apple IIe and other programs of that era.


    --
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
    nothing. - Unknown


  16. Re: Linux Screenshots

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:23:13 -0700
    :
    > "Ben" stated in post g6ntcg$va1$1@news.mixmin.net on
    > 7/29/08 1:08 PM:
    >
    >> Snit wrote:
    >>> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    >>> 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>>
    >>>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    >>>> all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    >>>> they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    >>>> print.
    >>>
    >>> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    >>> cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    >>> key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    >>> *Windows* way...
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    >> the Windows way. =P

    >
    > Well, Windows did it the "Mac" way but not as well...


    Depends on how one defines "well"; Microsoft has been far
    more profitable than Apple thus far, though I for one
    think Apple products are by and large better engineered,
    and AAPL in the market lately has been doing very well
    against MSFT and the S&P500, percentage-wise.

    Not that either profits or market share tells one much
    regarding keyboard shortcuts or technical superiority.

    > most Linux programs
    > got it wrong in the same way Windows does... and if a few
    > do not they would be inconsistent with the rest of the distro!
    >


    Windows is the de facto standard; that's why we get
    silliness in Linux Land such as Ctrl/C or Ctrl/X -> CtrlV.
    (Apple uses Option instead of Ctrl, AIUI, and has its own
    issues; the one-button mouse precludes the X/Unix solution
    of left press/drag/release to define selection region,
    and middle to paste. To be fair, the X/Unix solution has
    its own problems; misclicking on another windows' text might
    wipe out one's existing selection, forcing one to find that
    window again.)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. Now in nine exciting editions. Try them all!
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  17. Re: Screen/Area Capture in Ubuntu 8.x = back to the past

    Ignoramus31137 wrote:
    > Moshe Goldfarb. wrote:
    >> Psyc Geek (TAB) wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yep, I had to capture a part of a screen. So I googled. And
    >>> i came across scrot. What is scrot?

    >
    > I am sorry that you did not come across Alt-PrintScreen.
    >
    > So you log on to your Ubuntu and press Alt-PrintScreen and you
    > have your screen capture. It even prompts you for the file name
    > to save it, how nice.
    >
    > This "scrot", I think is more for spying on your spouse with a
    > cron job, to take screen picture every minute of some other
    > special things like that.


    Goldfarb is a known troll. He attempts to create trouble. Best
    to ignore him. If you do answer please ensure that you replace
    the heavy cross-posting with a follow-up to a single newsgroup.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



  18. Re: Linux Screenshots

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 12:44:01 -0700, Snit wrote:

    > Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    > cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    > key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    > *Windows* way...


    How do you know? I never read this.

  19. Re: Linux Screenshots

    "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    o4c4m5-8uk.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 7/29/08 1:45 PM:

    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >
    > wrote
    > on Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:23:13 -0700
    > :
    >> "Ben" stated in post g6ntcg$va1$1@news.mixmin.net on
    >> 7/29/08 1:08 PM:
    >>
    >>> Snit wrote:
    >>>> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    >>>> 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>>>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    >>>>> all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    >>>>> they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    >>>>> print.
    >>>>
    >>>> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    >>>> cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    >>>> key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    >>>> *Windows* way...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    >>> the Windows way. =P

    >>
    >> Well, Windows did it the "Mac" way but not as well...

    >
    > Depends on how one defines "well"; Microsoft has been far
    > more profitable than Apple thus far, though I for one
    > think Apple products are by and large better engineered,
    > and AAPL in the market lately has been doing very well
    > against MSFT and the S&P500, percentage-wise.
    >
    > Not that either profits or market share tells one much
    > regarding keyboard shortcuts or technical superiority.


    I am talking in terms of usability.

    >> most Linux programs
    >> got it wrong in the same way Windows does... and if a few
    >> do not they would be inconsistent with the rest of the distro!
    >>

    >
    > Windows is the de facto standard; that's why we get
    > silliness in Linux Land such as Ctrl/C or Ctrl/X -> CtrlV.
    > (Apple uses Option instead of Ctrl,


    Actually Apple uses the Apple key... or the Command key as it is now called
    (and has been for many years... sigh).

    > AIUI, and has its own
    > issues; the one-button mouse precludes the X/Unix solution
    > of left press/drag/release to define selection region,
    > and middle to paste. To be fair, the X/Unix solution has
    > its own problems; misclicking on another windows' text might
    > wipe out one's existing selection, forcing one to find that
    > window again.)




    --
    When I'm working on a problem, I never think about beauty. I think only how
    to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not
    beautiful, I know it is wrong. -- R. Buckminster Fuller


  20. Re: Linux Screenshots

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Tue, 29 Jul 2008 18:28:14 -0700
    :
    > "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    > o4c4m5-8uk.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 7/29/08 1:45 PM:
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:23:13 -0700
    >> :
    >>> "Ben" stated in post g6ntcg$va1$1@news.mixmin.net on
    >>> 7/29/08 1:08 PM:
    >>>
    >>>> Snit wrote:
    >>>>> "Ben" stated in post g6nrac$ts8$3@news.mixmin.net on
    >>>>> 7/29/08 12:33 PM:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Who would have thought it was alphabetized under T for TAKE
    >>>>>>> SCREENSHOT.
    >>>>>>> That is like putting Open Office under L for LOAD OPEN OFFICE.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I was looking under S for SCREEN CAPTURE and W for Window Capture.
    >>>>>>> Linux. No thought into design.
    >>>>>> Maybe because the other keys are bound to other functions? It's not like
    >>>>>> all operating systems use ctrl+v for paste, which is similarly odd since
    >>>>>> they could have always bound it to ctrl+p, but that was already taken by
    >>>>>> print.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Windows "borrowed" the key combos for print and save and copy and paste and
    >>>>> cut and others from Macs... but they did not do it as well... they used a
    >>>>> key that is not as convenient to use. Linux, largely, has adopted the
    >>>>> *Windows* way...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Really, when you consider where it all started, it's the Mac way, not
    >>>> the Windows way. =P
    >>>
    >>> Well, Windows did it the "Mac" way but not as well...

    >>
    >> Depends on how one defines "well"; Microsoft has been far
    >> more profitable than Apple thus far, though I for one
    >> think Apple products are by and large better engineered,
    >> and AAPL in the market lately has been doing very well
    >> against MSFT and the S&P500, percentage-wise.
    >>
    >> Not that either profits or market share tells one much
    >> regarding keyboard shortcuts or technical superiority.

    >
    > I am talking in terms of usability.


    Windows: botched.
    Mac: nice GUI, usable.
    Linux: satisfactory (to me) GUI, usable, but the GUI needs work.

    >
    >>> most Linux programs
    >>> got it wrong in the same way Windows does... and if a few
    >>> do not they would be inconsistent with the rest of the distro!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Windows is the de facto standard; that's why we get
    >> silliness in Linux Land such as Ctrl/C or Ctrl/X -> CtrlV.
    >> (Apple uses Option instead of Ctrl,

    >
    > Actually Apple uses the Apple key... or the Command key as it
    > is now called (and has been for many years... sigh).


    I suspect part of that is because many keyboards have a
    Windows key -- including the Dell USB keyboard I'm typing
    on at the moment, and my nx9010 builtin. In fact, this
    Dell keyboard has two, one on each side of the space bar
    (actually, the alt keys), plus a third key just to the
    right of the right one which presumably does a popup menu,
    were Gnome to care -- which I and it doesn't right now.

    So with Apple, it's an Apple key -- despite the proper name
    being the Command key.

    I doubt there's a keyboard with a Linux key, though one
    could probably retrofit an existing keyboard easily enough,
    assuming somebody sells molded keycaps with a little
    penguin on them, or a little decal (the Dell keyboard looks
    like one could scrape off the logo with a bit of work).

    >
    >> AIUI, and has its own
    >> issues; the one-button mouse precludes the X/Unix solution
    >> of left press/drag/release to define selection region,
    >> and middle to paste. To be fair, the X/Unix solution has
    >> its own problems; misclicking on another windows' text might
    >> wipe out one's existing selection, forcing one to find that
    >> window again.)

    >
    >
    >



    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Is it cheaper to learn Linux, or to hire someone
    to fix your Windows problems?
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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