Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back - Linux ; On Jul 20, 1:06*am, raylopez99 wrote: > I, a faithful WIndows user, will try DSL Linux and report back my > opinion. *The target machine: *an old Pentium "One" (P54CS), with 48 > MB RAM, two HDs of about 1 ...

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Thread: Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back

  1. Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back

    On Jul 20, 1:06*am, raylopez99 wrote:
    > I, a faithful WIndows user, will try DSL Linux and report back my
    > opinion. *The target machine: *an old Pentium "One" (P54CS), with 48
    > MB RAM, two HDs of about 1 to 2 GB each, a cheap video card (which
    > apparently is the culprit for difficult LInux installations I've read;
    > if so, I'll swap it with a more expensive video card I have lying
    > around), and dial up modem, $5 keyboard with a few broken and stuck
    > keys, and USB mouse.
    >

    .
    >
    > So consider me a Third World test case, or basket case, as the case
    > may be...
    >


    Just tried it. My initial reaction: "wow!, great!" until I found it
    was only running off the CD...

    Version: dsl 4.2.5 "syslinux", kernel 2.4.31, which the Damn Small
    Linux page said is the most stable for old hardware like I'm running
    it on.

    As an amateur programmer, I was very impressed by the GUI (don't know
    what it was, probably not KDE/Gnome but some stripped down version).
    That said, the GUI looked like hobbyware, but it's only because the
    Linux developers don't have the .NET Forms/MFC API that gives
    incredible uniformity simply using the 'drag-and-drop' invented by
    Alan Cooper of Microsoft, originally for Visual Basic. But, like I
    say, it's hard to get the interface 'right' without a professional API
    such as MFC/Forms by the Visual Studio of Microsoft. So count me
    impressed, as in 'nice college try' (but still, objectively speaking,
    an amateurish failure).

    Disappointments: it was not loaded on the HD, but the CD. I created
    a directory using the "emelFM" file manager; I created a file using
    the DSL text editor, and saved it (in RAM, not the HD, which I never
    could figure out how to access; I guess you need to set up a Linux
    partition, so it can be read by DSL on bootup, right? Or install to
    the HD first), I used "Bash" to test Unix commands like 'ls' and
    'move' to rename, view and create directories and files; I formatted a
    floppy disc in the floppy drive, successfully, playing around with
    "mount" but I could not, using any file manager, read the floppy or
    view it, even trying typing in the default name for the floppy, which
    apparently was "/dev/fd0"; I noticed there is a internet configuration
    utility, with a very poor GUI pasted onto a text interface, for
    connecting with a dialup modem (which is what I plan to use with this
    machine), but you have to know stuff like PAP (http://modemhelp.net/
    faqs/auth.shtml), as well as the standard PPP configuration stuff,
    which I guess I can figure out. But at least there's a way of
    connecting to the internet. Mozilla Firefox is a memory hog for a 38M
    RAM machine, so, assuming I can get Linux to work, I will switch to a
    lighter web browser.

    Commendations: I liked the GUI, with the above caveats; I liked the
    fact the floppy could be seen by the machine (but not accessed); I
    liked the text editor (which can save in RTF), the Word Reader (can
    read a .doc file it says, but I could not test it), the fact the sound
    card and video card were recognized (I don't plan to use the sound
    card, nor does this machine have a USB port, so no plans for a
    printer).

    WHat I need:

    I need somebody to point me to a _short_ book on Linux DSL or Linux in
    general. 100 to 200 pages, not more. A pocket guide. Apparently
    every Linux distro is different, which makes it bad because you can't
    ask a forum like this, you have to find a specialist forum that's
    likely closed, needs registration and gets one or two posts a day, so
    you have to wait a week to get a decent answer, but so be it.

    I need to actually install Linux to the HD--right now, running off the
    CD, it reminds me of a vapourware 'simulation' that looks good in
    theory, but it's just a bunch of splash screens.

    All in all, I give DSL a "C+", which surprised me since I was
    expecting a D or F grade product.

    Any advice appreciated, especially on short books on Linux. I got
    enough hobbies going and my real job is heating up, so I can't spend
    years learning the ins-and-outs of Linux, so, please, no doorstopper
    "Linux Bibles", as much as you might like these reference books.

    RL


  2. Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 07:26:33 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    > On Jul 20, 1:06*am, raylopez99 wrote:
    >> I, a faithful WIndows user, will try DSL Linux and report back my
    >> opinion. *The target machine: *an old Pentium "One" (P54CS), with 48 MB
    >> RAM, two HDs of about 1 to 2 GB each, a cheap video card (which
    >> apparently is the culprit for difficult LInux installations I've read;
    >> if so, I'll swap it with a more expensive video card I have lying
    >> around), and dial up modem, $5 keyboard with a few broken and stuck
    >> keys, and USB mouse.
    >>

    > .
    >>
    >> So consider me a Third World test case, or basket case, as the case may
    >> be...
    >>
    >>

    > Just tried it. My initial reaction: "wow!, great!" until I found it was
    > only running off the CD...


    If it was great running off the CD, it should be greater when running
    from the HD. And why would you expect it to be running fromt he HD if you
    didn't install it there?

    >
    > Version: dsl 4.2.5 "syslinux", kernel 2.4.31, which the Damn Small
    > Linux page said is the most stable for old hardware like I'm running it
    > on.
    >
    > As an amateur programmer, I was very impressed by the GUI (don't know
    > what it was, probably not KDE/Gnome but some stripped down version).


    Fluxbox, probably.

    > That said, the GUI looked like hobbyware, but it's only because the
    > Linux developers don't have the .NET Forms/MFC API that gives incredible
    > uniformity simply using the 'drag-and-drop' invented by Alan Cooper of
    > Microsoft, originally for Visual Basic. But, like I say, it's hard to
    > get the interface 'right' without a professional API such as MFC/Forms
    > by the Visual Studio of Microsoft. So count me impressed, as in 'nice
    > college try' (but still, objectively speaking, an amateurish failure).



    Learn to use your tools.

    >
    > Disappointments: it was not loaded on the HD, but the CD. I created a


    You didn't install it to CD.

    > directory using the "emelFM" file manager; I created a file using the
    > DSL text editor, and saved it (in RAM, not the HD, which I never could
    > figure out how to access; I guess you need to set up a Linux partition,
    > so it can be read by DSL on bootup, right? Or install to the HD first),



    Learn to use your tools.

    > I used "Bash" to test Unix commands like 'ls' and 'move' to rename, view
    > and create directories and files; I formatted a floppy disc in the
    > floppy drive, successfully, playing around with "mount" but I could not,
    > using any file manager, read the floppy or view it, even trying typing
    > in the default name for the floppy, which apparently was "/dev/fd0"; I


    Did you check to see if the floppy was mounted properly?

    > noticed there is a internet configuration utility, with a very poor GUI
    > pasted onto a text interface, for connecting with a dialup modem (which
    > is what I plan to use with this machine), but you have to know stuff
    > like PAP (http://modemhelp.net/ faqs/auth.shtml), as well as the
    > standard PPP configuration stuff, which I guess I can figure out. But
    > at least there's a way of connecting to the internet. Mozilla Firefox
    > is a memory hog for a 38M RAM machine, so, assuming I can get Linux to
    > work, I will switch to a lighter web browser.


    If you are accessing files, DSL (DSL, not Linux) is working.

    >
    > Commendations: I liked the GUI, with the above caveats; I liked the
    > fact the floppy could be seen by the machine (but not accessed); I liked
    > the text editor (which can save in RTF), the Word Reader (can read a
    > .doc file it says, but I could not test it), the fact the sound card and
    > video card were recognized (I don't plan to use the sound card, nor does
    > this machine have a USB port, so no plans for a printer).
    >
    > WHat I need:
    >
    > I need somebody to point me to a _short_ book on Linux DSL or Linux in
    > general. 100 to 200 pages, not more. A pocket guide.


    What is wrong with the DSL community support?




    Learn to use your resources.


    > Apparently every
    > Linux distro is different, which makes it bad because you can't ask a
    > forum like this, you have to find a specialist forum that's likely
    > closed, needs registration and gets one or two posts a day, so you have
    > to wait a week to get a decent answer, but so be it.


    Or you can read the pages that are already there...

    >
    > I need to actually install Linux to the HD--right now, running off the
    > CD, it reminds me of a vapourware 'simulation' that looks good in
    > theory, but it's just a bunch of splash screens.
    >
    > All in all, I give DSL a "C+", which surprised me since I was expecting
    > a D or F grade product.
    >
    > Any advice appreciated, especially on short books on Linux. I got
    > enough hobbies going and my real job is heating up, so I can't spend
    > years learning the ins-and-outs of Linux, so, please, no doorstopper
    > "Linux Bibles", as much as you might like these reference books.
    >
    > RL






    --
    Rick

  3. Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back

    On Jul 20, 10:54*am, Rick wrote:

    > > As an amateur programmer, I was very impressed by the GUI (don't know
    > > what it was, probably not KDE/Gnome but some stripped down version).

    >
    > Fluxbox, probably.


    Yep. Older versions of DSL used only Fluxbox. Newer versions use
    Fluxbox and JWM.



  4. Re: OK I will try DSL Linux and report back

    On Jul 20, 7:54*am, Rick wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 07:26:33 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:


    > > Any advice appreciated, especially on short books on Linux. *I got
    > > enough hobbies going and my real job is heating up, so I can't spend
    > > years learning the ins-and-outs of Linux, so, please, no doorstopper
    > > "Linux Bibles", as much as you might like these reference books.

    >


    Thanks for the input Rick and Darth Chaos. I have bookmarked the DSL
    page. If you have a hardcopy book to reference Linux, even something
    more than just a pocket guide, please recommend. I don't like using
    the web for this Linux machine because I keep having to switch back
    and forth using the AB switch (only one monitor) to get information,
    and like I say the old Linux machine has only a dialup modem. I'll
    check the Amazon.com pages but sometimes they have too much
    information.

    Also if you have recommendations about what's wrong with DSL or any
    other better version of DSL for an old machine let me know. ALso I
    think VM Ware "virtual" OS option, where you can run Linux from inside
    Windows (Win 2k in my case) is out of the question for such an old
    machine, a Pentium I 100MHz, agreed? I think that goes without
    saying, but if anybody disagrees let me know. So I'll try a direct
    install of DSL onto the HD this week.

    See, you never thought I would call you by your first name, Rick? I'm
    such a nice guy.

    RL

    <--....

  5. Re: OK I will try DSL {why no recent books on Linux?}

    "Rick" stated in post
    NtKdnXJmu6HaCR7VnZ2dnUVZ_jmdnZ2d@supernews.com on 7/20/08 12:38 PM:

    > Windows != Damn Small Linux != OS X.


    At least you understand this much.

    Sad that you feel the need to brag about figuring that out.


    --
    What do you call people who are afraid of Santa Claus? Claustrophobic.


  6. Re: OK I will try DSL {why no recent books on Linux?}

    On Jul 20, 12:38*pm, Rick wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 09:46:36 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:


    > > Linux Bible, 2008 Edition: Boot up to Ubuntu, Fedora, KNOPPIX, Debian,
    > > openSUSE, and 11 Other Distributions [including DSL]


    I'll probably order this book anyway, since it's good to read to jog
    the memory.


    > SOME of your skills and knowledge is transferable. Some is not. There is
    > a lot of information in the DSL pages.


    Well I hope it works out. My expectations are low, just something to
    surf the net, compose a .RTF text file to email to somebody, and copy
    onto a floppy to print at the local library, and that's about it. No
    sound, no fancy graphics, no USB, no games (I did notice a DSL Linux
    minesweeper game however, LOL), no video. The bar is low, but the
    hardware is old, so we'll see what gives way first when I install DSL
    to the HD this week.

    If Linux looks as good as the CD 'live' demo, then it has a future for
    the third world IMO and I might have to eat some of my more
    inflammatory words posted here.

    RL

  7. Re: OK I will try DSL {why no recent books on Linux?}

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 14:21:59 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    > On Jul 20, 12:38*pm, Rick wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 09:46:36 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    >
    >> > Linux Bible, 2008 Edition: Boot up to Ubuntu, Fedora, KNOPPIX,
    >> > Debian, openSUSE, and 11 Other Distributions [including DSL]

    >
    > I'll probably order this book anyway, since it's good to read to jog the
    > memory.
    >
    >
    >> SOME of your skills and knowledge is transferable. Some is not. There
    >> is a lot of information in the DSL pages.

    >
    > Well I hope it works out. My expectations are low, just something to
    > surf the net, compose a .RTF text file to email to somebody, and copy
    > onto a floppy to print at the local library, and that's about it. No
    > sound, no fancy graphics, no USB, no games (I did notice a DSL Linux
    > minesweeper game however, LOL), no video. The bar is low, but the
    > hardware is old, so we'll see what gives way first when I install DSL to
    > the HD this week.
    >
    > If Linux looks as good as the CD 'live' demo, then it has a future for
    > the third world IMO and I might have to eat some of my more inflammatory
    > words posted here.
    >
    > RL



    It is Damn Small Linux, not "Linux" and you can install it to the HD
    quite easily. You can also convert it to a Debian install.


    --
    Rick

  8. Re: OK I will try DSL {why no recent books on Linux?}

    On Jul 20, 6:33*pm, Rick wrote:

    > > If Linux looks as good as the CD 'live' demo, then it has a future for
    > > the third world IMO and I might have to eat some of my more inflammatory
    > > words posted here.

    >
    > > RL

    >
    > It is Damn Small Linux, not "Linux" and you can install it to the HD
    > quite easily. You can also convert it to a Debian install.
    >



    You are conceding that Linux can be bifurcated into various distros,
    and each distro exists seperately from the others? Interesting, if
    so. This is traditionally the argument made by Linux haters (that
    there are too many mutually incompatible distros).

    Cheers

    RL

  9. Re: OK I will try DSL {why no recent books on Linux?}

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 04:14:27 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    > On Jul 20, 6:33*pm, Rick wrote:
    >
    >> > If Linux looks as good as the CD 'live' demo, then it has a future
    >> > for the third world IMO and I might have to eat some of my more
    >> > inflammatory words posted here.

    >>
    >> > RL

    >>
    >> It is Damn Small Linux, not "Linux" and you can install it to the HD
    >> quite easily. You can also convert it to a Debian install.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You are conceding that Linux can be bifurcated into various distros, and


    No, I am not. Linux kernels are used by several distributions. There is a
    difference between that, and what you stated.

    > each distro exists seperately from the others? Interesting, if so.
    > This is traditionally the argument made by Linux haters (that there are
    > too many mutually incompatible distros).


    "Incompatible" is problematic. In many instances, I can take a tarball
    from one disto, compile it and install it on other distros. (./configure.
    make, make install or check install, is extremely easy). Installing
    binaries from one distro can cause problems when installed on other
    distros.

    .... not unlike running many "XP apps" under Vista.


    --
    Rick

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